Service Architecture (service + architecture)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


High-performance hybrid information service architecture

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 15 2010
Mehmet S. Aktas
Abstract We introduce a distributed high-performance Information Service Architecture, which forms a metadata replica hosting system to manage both highly dynamic small-scale metadata and relatively large static metadata associated with Grid/Web Services. We present an empirical evaluation of the proposed architecture and investigate its practical usefulness. The results demonstrate that the proposed system achieves high performance and fault tolerance with negligible processing overheads. The results also indicate that efficient decentralized hybrid Information Service Architectures can be built by utilizing publish-subscribe-based messaging schemes. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The LEAD Portal: a TeraGrid gateway and application service architecture

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 6 2007
Marcus Christie
Abstract The Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) Portal is a science application portal designed to enable effective use of Grid resources in exploring mesoscale meteorological phenomena. The aim of the LEAD Portal is to provide a more productive interface for doing experimental work by the meteorological research community, as well as bringing weather research to a wider class of users, meaning pre-college students in grades 6,12 and undergraduate college students. In this paper, we give an overview of the LEAD project and the role that LEAD portal is playing in reaching its goals. We then describe the various technologies we are using to bring powerful and complex scientific tools to educational and research users. These technologies,a fine-grained capability based authorization framework, an application service factory toolkit, and a Web services-based workflow execution engine and supporting tools,enable our team to deploy these once inaccessible, stovepipe scientific codes onto a Grid where they can be collectively utilized. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


A peer-to-peer IPTV service architecture for the IP multimedia subsystem

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS, Issue 6-7 2010
A. Bikfalvi
Abstract During these last years the Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) service and the different peer-to-peer (P2P) technologies have generated an increasing interest for the developers and the research community that find in them the solution to deal with the scalability problem of media streaming and reducing costs at the same time. However, despite of the benefits obtained in Internet-based applications and the growing deployment of commercial IPTV systems, there has been a little effort in combining them both. With the advent of the next-generation-network platforms such as the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS), which advocates for an open and inter-operable service infrastructure, P2P emerges as a possible solution in situations where the traditional streaming mechanisms are not possible or not economically feasible. In this paper, we propose an IPTV service architecture for the IMS that combines a centralized control layer and a distributed, P2P-like, media layer that relies on the IMS devices or peers located in the customers' premises to act as streaming forwarding nodes. We extend the existing IMS IPTV standardization work that has already been done in 3GPP and ETSI TISPAN in order to require a minimum number of architectural changes. The objective is to obtain a system with a similar performance to the one in currently deployed systems and with the flexibility of P2P. One of the main challenges is to achieve comparable response times to user actions such as changing and tuning into channels, as well as providing a fast recovery mechanism when streaming nodes leave. To accomplish this we introduce the idea of foster peers as peers having inactive multimedia sessions and reserved resources. These peers are on stand-by until their functionality is required and at that moment, they are able to accept downstream peers at short notice for events requiring urgent treatment like channel changing and recovery. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Personal mobility support in future service architectures

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS, Issue 9 2001
P. P. Demestichas
Abstract Support for personal mobility will be among the key factors for success in the competitive communications market of the future. This paper proposes enhancements to the personal mobility support capabilities of service architectures. The TINA service architecture is used as a reference, even though our approach is applicable to other models as well. Our starting point is a business case that falls into the realm of personal mobility. The aim of the business case is to enable users that are found outside their home domain to access services by choosing the best visited retailer, i.e. the one offering adequate quality services in the most cost-efficient manner. In the sequel the following key issues are addressed. First, the introduction of the additional functionality that is required for supporting the business case, and the realisation through appropriate service components. Second, the integration of the new service components in the standard TINA service architecture. Third, the detailed description of a version of the logic of the new components. In this last respect, we formally state, mathematically formulate and solve problems related to the visited retailer selection. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Network and service architecture for emerging services based on home sensor networks

BELL LABS TECHNICAL JOURNAL, Issue 2 2009
Harish Viswanathan
Sensor networks in the home can enable a variety of applications such as home monitoring and control, home security, home energy management, and home health care. Current state-of-the-art solutions typically target a single sensor application and do not take advantage of the established infrastructure of the broadband service provider, such as a telco operator or cable provider. In this paper, we propose an alternative solution that provides a comprehensive and scalable service platform for multiple parallel home sensor applications, even from third party providers. We highlight the advantages that a broadband service provider holds for providing these emerging high margin services, and derive a suitable end-to-end network architecture. We describe the functions of each of the main components and some of their interfaces, and pay particular attention to one of the key technological challenges: the commissioning and management of the home sensor network. In particular, we describe a laboratory implementation that demonstrates the feasibility of automatic commissioning and remote management of the sensor network. 2009 Alcatel-Lucent. [source]


Using Web 2.0 for scientific applications and scientific communities

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 5 2009
Marlon E. Pierce
Abstract Web 2.0 approaches are revolutionizing the Internet, blurring lines between developers and users and enabling collaboration and social networks that scale into the millions of users. As discussed in our previous work, the core technologies of Web 2.0 effectively define a comprehensive distributed computing environment that parallels many of the more complicated service-oriented systems such as Web service and Grid service architectures. In this paper we build upon this previous work to discuss the applications of Web 2.0 approaches to four different scenarios: client-side JavaScript libraries for building and composing Grid services; integrating server-side portlets with ,rich client' AJAX tools and Web services for analyzing Global Positioning System data; building and analyzing folksonomies of scientific user communities through social bookmarking; and applying microformats and GeoRSS to problems in scientific metadata description and delivery. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Personal mobility support in future service architectures

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS, Issue 9 2001
P. P. Demestichas
Abstract Support for personal mobility will be among the key factors for success in the competitive communications market of the future. This paper proposes enhancements to the personal mobility support capabilities of service architectures. The TINA service architecture is used as a reference, even though our approach is applicable to other models as well. Our starting point is a business case that falls into the realm of personal mobility. The aim of the business case is to enable users that are found outside their home domain to access services by choosing the best visited retailer, i.e. the one offering adequate quality services in the most cost-efficient manner. In the sequel the following key issues are addressed. First, the introduction of the additional functionality that is required for supporting the business case, and the realisation through appropriate service components. Second, the integration of the new service components in the standard TINA service architecture. Third, the detailed description of a version of the logic of the new components. In this last respect, we formally state, mathematically formulate and solve problems related to the visited retailer selection. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]