Authoritarianism

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Authoritarianism

  • Right-W authoritarianism
  • right-wing authoritarianism


  • Selected Abstracts


    Right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation and the dimensions of generalized prejudice: A longitudinal test

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 4 2010
    Frank Asbrock
    Abstract A Dual Process Model (DPM) approach to prejudice proposes that there should be at least two dimensions of generalized prejudice relating to outgroup stratification and social perception, which should be differentially predicted by Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and Social Dominance Orientation (SDO). The current study assessed the causal effects of SDO and RWA on three dimensions of prejudice using a full cross-lagged longitudinal sample (N,=,127). As expected, RWA, but not SDO, predicted prejudice towards ,dangerous' groups, SDO, but not RWA, predicted prejudice towards ,derogated' groups, and both RWA and SDO predicted prejudice towards ,dissident' groups. Results support previously untested causal predictions derived from the DPM and indicate that different forms of prejudice result from different SDO- and RWA-based motivational processes. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Authoritarianism is good for you: Right-wing authoritarianism as a buffering factor for mental distress

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 1 2009
    Alain Van Hiel
    Abstract Although common knowledge seems to agree that authoritarianism is ,bad to the self', previous studies yielded inconclusive results with respect to the relationship between authoritarianism and mental distress. The present research explores whether the impact of facilitators of mental distress on actual mental distress depends on the level of authoritarianism. Study 1 includes a sample of 132 adults and demonstrated less negative consequences of D-type personality on depression for individuals with high rather than low levels of authoritarianism. Study 2 conducted in a sample of 109 elderly revealed that the effects of negative stressful life events on mental distress were curbed by higher levels of authoritarianism. It is concluded that while previous studies have amply shown that authoritarianism has adverse consequences for other people, these negative effects do not appear to be particularly present for the self. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Right wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation and the dimensions of generalized prejudice

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2007
    John Duckitt
    Abstract Prior research suggests that individuals' prejudiced attitudes form a single generalized dimension predicted by Right Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and Social Dominance Orientation (SDO). A dual process approach, however, expects different domains of generalized prejudice that relate differentially to RWA and SDO. To test this, 212 participants rated attitudes to 24 typically disliked groups. Factor analysis revealed three distinct generalized prejudice dimensions. Hierarchical Linear Modelling indicated that attitudes towards a ,dangerous' groups domain was significantly related only with RWA, attitudes toward a second ,derogated' groups domain was related only to SDO, and attitudes toward a third, ,dissident' groups, domain was significantly related to both, but powerfully with RWA and weakly with SDO. These findings have implications for explaining and reducing prejudice. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    The intervening role of social worldviews in the relationship between the five-factor model of personality and social attitudes

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2007
    A. Van Hiel
    Abstract The present research investigates in a student (N,=,183) and a voter sample (N,=,276) whether the relationships between the Five-Factor Model (FFM) personality dimensions and social attitudes (i.e. Right-Wing Authoritarianism [RWA] and Social Dominance Orientation [SDO]) are mediated by social worldviews (i.e. dangerous and jungle worldviews). Two important results were obtained. First, the perception of the world as inherently dangerous and chaotic partially mediated the relationships of the personality dimensions Openness and Neuroticism and the social attitude RWA. Second, the jungle worldview completely mediated the relationships between Agreeableness and SDO, but considerable item overlap between the jungle worldview and SDO was also noted. It was further revealed that acquiescence response set and item overlap had an impact on social worldviews and attitudes, but that their relationships were hardly affected by these biases. The discussion focuses on the status of social worldviews to explain social attitudes. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    A comparison of various authoritarianism scales in Belgian Flanders

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2007
    Alain Van Hiel
    Abstract The present study compared in a Flemish adult sample (N,=,480) four recently developed authoritarianism scales as well as the widely used Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) scale. Results revealed that all these measures were strongly related and that they showed relationships of comparable magnitude with various indicators of right-wing ideology such as conservatism and racism, as well as with political party preferences. Analyses confirmed the superior fit of a multidimensional model for the scales that are assumed to have an explicit underlying multidimensional structure, but it was also revealed that there was little consensus on what these dimensions exactly mean. Finally, the results indicated serious problems of overlap between cultural conservatism and authoritarianism for some of the scales. Having relied exclusively on an empirical method for comparing the utility of these scales, the use of other criteria for a final assessment of the authoritarianism scales is elaborated upon. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    What matters most to prejudice: Big Five personality, Social Dominance Orientation, or Right-Wing Authoritarianism?

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 6 2004
    Bo Ekehammar
    Whereas previous research has studied the relation of either (i) personality with prejudice, (ii) personality with social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA), or (iii) SDO and RWA with prejudice, the present research integrates all approaches within the same model. In our study (N,=,183), various causal models of the relationships among the Big Five, SDO, RWA, and Generalized Prejudice are proposed and tested. Generalized Prejudice scores were obtained from a factor analysis of the scores on various prejudice instruments (racism, sexism, prejudice toward homosexuals, and mentally disabled people), which yielded a one-factor solution. The best-fitting causal model, which was our suggested hypothetical model, showed that Big Five personality had no direct effect on Generalized Prejudice but an indirect effect transmitted through RWA and SDO, where RWA seems to capture personality aspects to a greater extent than SDO. Specifically, Generalized Prejudice was affected indirectly by Extraversion, Openness to Experience, and Conscientiousness through RWA, and by Agreeableness through SDO, whereas Neuroticism had no effect at all. The results are discussed against the background of previous research and the personality and social psychology approaches to the study of prejudice. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    The police officer's terrorist dilemma: trust resilience following fatal errors

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 6 2008
    Mathew P. White
    Suicide attacks have raised the stakes for officers deciding whether or not to shoot a suspect (,Police Officer's Terrorist Dilemma'). Despite high-profile errors we know little about how trust in the police is affected by their response to the terrorist threat. Building on a conceptualisation of lay observers as intuitive signal detection theorists, a general population sample (N,=,1153) were presented with scenarios manipulated in terms of suspect status (Armed/Unarmed), officer decision (Shoot/Not Shoot) and outcome severity (e.g. suspect armed with Bomb/Knife; police shoot suspect/suspect plus child bystander). Supporting predictions, people showed higher trust in officers who made correct decisions, reflecting good discrimination ability and who decided to shoot, reflecting an ,appropriate' response bias given the relative costs and benefits. This latter effect was moderated by (a) outcome severity, suggesting it did not simply reflect a preference for a particular type of action, and (b) preferences for a tough stance towards terrorism indexed by Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA). Despite loss of civilian life, failure to prevent minor terror attacks resulted in no loss of trust amongst people low in RWA, whereas among people high in RWA trust was positive when police erroneously shot an unarmed suspect. Relations to alternative definitions of trust and procedural justice research are discussed. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Authoritarianism and Islamic Movements in the Middle East: Research and Theory-building in the Twenty-first Century

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
    Oded Haklai
    In the previous decade, many scholars with expertise in the politics of the Middle East pointed to an intellectual gulf between Middle East studies and mainstream international and comparative political studies. Common perceptions that the Middle East experience was too exceptional to be theory-relevant and that area studies work was excessively a-theoretical were said to be responsible for the alleged chasm. If these concerns are taken at face value, a review of research published on authoritarianism and Islamic movements in the first years of the twenty-first century in top academic presses and scholarly journals indicates that a counter trend has emerged. Middle East area experts are increasingly making use of theoretical frameworks produced by non-Middle East specialists. There is, however, variation in how well disciplinary social science analytical tools are applied and in the significance of various works to theory-building. More emphasis on theory-testing and construction (rather than just theory application) as well as cross-regional and cross-cultural comparisons will increase the comparative value of works produced by Middle East area studies specialists and will add to their visibility in the discipline at large. [source]


    Protestantism and Authoritarianism: Weber's Secondary Problem

    JOURNAL FOR THE THEORY OF SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR, Issue 2 2010
    MILAN ZAFIROVSKI
    First page of article [source]


    Decentralization's Nondemocratic Roots: Authoritarianism and Subnational Reform in Latin America

    LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS AND SOCIETY, Issue 1 2006
    Kent Baton
    ABSTRACT This study challenges the common view of authoritarianism as an unambiguously centralizing experience by investigating the subnational reforms that military governments actually introduced in Latin America. It argues that the decision by military authorities to dismiss democratically elected mayors and governors opened a critical juncture for the subsequent development of subnational institutions. Once they centralized political authority, the generals could contemplate changes that expanded the institutional, administrative, and governing capacity of subnational governments. This article shows how cross-national variation in the content and consistency of the generals' economic goals led to quite distinct subnational changes; in each case, these reforms profoundly shaped the democracies that reemerged in the 1980s and 1990s. [source]


    A Tripartite Approach to Right-Wing Authoritarianism: The Authoritarianism-Conservatism-Traditionalism Model

    POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2010
    John Duckitt
    Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) has been conceptualized and measured as a unidimensional personality construct comprising the covariation of the three traits of authoritarian submission, authoritarian aggression, and conventionalism. However, new approaches have criticized this conceptualization and instead viewed these three "traits" as three distinct, though related, social attitude dimensions. Here we extend this approach providing clear definitions of these three dimensions as ideological attitude constructs of Authoritarianism, Conservatism, and Traditionalism. These dimensions are seen as attitudinal expressions of basic social values or motivational goals that represent different, though related, strategies for attaining collective security at the expense of individual autonomy. We report data from five samples and three different countries showing that these three dimensions could be reliably measured and were factorially distinct. The three dimensions also differentially predicted interpersonal behaviour, social policy support, and political party support. It is argued that conceptualizing and measuring RWA as a set of three related ideological attitude dimensions may better explain complex sociopolitical phenomena than the currently dominant unidimensional personality based model. [source]


    A Motivational Model of Authoritarianism: Integrating Personal and Situational Determinants

    POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2009
    Philipp Jugert
    We describe and test a collective security model of authoritarianism. This model sees Right Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) as directly caused by collective security motivation (CSM), which is in turn influenced jointly by personality (with its effects mediated through group identification and dangerous world beliefs) and social threat (with its effects mediated through dangerous world beliefs). Two studies tested this model using student samples,one was correlational (N = 218), while the other included an experimental manipulation of threat using future scenarios (N = 136). Structural equation analyses partially supported the model suggesting that CSM fully mediated the effects of threat and group identification on RWA, but only partially mediated the effect of personality, which also had important direct effects. [source]


    Fighting and Flying: Archival Analysis of Threat, Authoritarianism, and the North American Comic Book

    POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 6 2005
    Bill E. Peterson
    In this archival study, themes of authoritarianism (Adorno, Frenkel-Brunswik, Levinson, & Sanford, 1950) were content coded in American comic books. Comic books produced during years of relatively high social and economic threat (1978,82 and 1991,92) contained more aggressive imagery, more conventional themes, less intraception, and fewer spoken lines by women characters relative to comic books produced during years of relatively low threat (1983,90). Unexpectedly, speaking roles for characters of color did not differ due to the influence of threat. Discussion focused on the theoretical relationship between threat and manifestations of authoritarianism at the societal and individual levels. [source]


    National Threat and Political Culture: Authoritarianism, Antiauthoritarianism, and the September 11 Attacks

    POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
    Andrew J. Perrin
    This paper uses published letters to the editor of major U.S. newspapers to investigate the cultural effects of a major national threat: the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. It is based on a hand-coded, stratified random sample of 1,100 letters to the editor published in 17 major papers in the United States (544 pre-September 11, 556 post-September 11). The letters are drawn from a population of 8,101 published letters. Degrees of both authoritarianism and antiauthoritarianism, as well as the general salience of questions of authoritarianism, rose significantly in the post-attack period. The paper suggests that, instead of a simple threat-authoritarianism causal link, authoritarianism and antiauthoritarianism are paired elements of political culture that are invoked together in the face of a national threat. [source]


    The Dimensionality of Right-Wing Authoritarianism: Lessons from the Dilemma between Theory and Measurement

    POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
    Friedrich Funke
    The RWA Scale (Altemeyer, 1981, 1988, 1996) is commonly regarded as the best measure of right-wing authoritarianism. The one-dimensional instrument assesses the covariation of three attitudinal clusters: authoritarian submission, authoritarian aggression, and conventionalism. The incongruence between the implicit conceptual dimensionality on the one hand and methodological operationalization on the other makes room for discussion about whether it would be advantageous to measure the 3 facets of RWA separately. I rely on three arguments: (1) confirmatory factor analyses showing that three-dimensional scales fit the data better than the conventional one-dimensional practice; (2) the dimensions showing a considerable interdimension discrepancy in their capability to explain validation criteria; and (3) the dimensions showing an intradimensional discrepancy which is dependent upon the research question. The argumentation is illustrated by empirical evidence from several Web-based studies among German Internet users. [source]


    Threat, Authoritarianism, and Selective Exposure to Information

    POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
    Howard Lavine
    We examined the hypothesis that threat alters the cognitive strategies used by high authoritarians in seeking out new political information from the environment. In a laboratory experiment, threat was manipulated through a "mortality salience" manipulation used in research on terror management theory (Pyszczynski, Solomon & Greenberg, 2003). Subjects (N = 92) were then invited to read one of three editorial articles on the topic of capital punishment. We found that in the absence of threat, both low and high authoritarians were responsive to salient norms of evenhandedness in information selection, preferring exposure to a two-sided article that presents the merits of both sides of an issue to an article that selectively touts the benefits of the pro or con side of the issue. However, in the presence of threat, high but not low authoritarians became significantly more interested in exposure to an article containing uniformly pro-attitudinal arguments, and significantly less interested in a balanced, two-sided article. Finally, a path analysis indicated that selective exposure to attitude-congruent information led to more internally consistent policy attitudes and inhibited attitude change. Discussion focuses on the role of threat in conditioning the cognitive and attitudinal effects of authoritarianism. [source]


    The Collapse of Fujimorismo: Authoritarianism and its Limits

    BULLETIN OF LATIN AMERICAN RESEARCH, Issue 3 2001
    John Crabtree
    The resignation of Alberto Fujimori as president of Peru and the convening of fresh elections for 2001 invites a reassessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the Fujimorato. Fujimori's was a hybrid regime, an uneasy admixture of democratic and autocratic elements. While following prescribed election timetables and tolerating certain opposition, this was an authoritarian government. Grounded on a pact with the armed forces and involving a concentration of presidential power, its support was organised along populist lines that took advantage of the weakness of political parties. However, as the regime's demise suggests, the tension between democratic and autocratic elements could never be properly reconciled. [source]


    Childhood predictors of adult criminality: are all risk factors reflected in childhood aggressiveness?

    CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 3 2002
    L. Rowell Huesmann
    Background Early aggressive behaviour is one of the best predictors of adult criminality. Aim To assess the degree to which family background variables, parental beliefs and behaviour and child intelligence predict child aggression and adult criminality. Method Data were used from the Colombia County Longitudinal Study, a longitudinal study of 856 children in third grade in New York, in 1959,60. Adult measures of criminal behaviour, child measures taken at age eight, child peer-nominated aggression, child's peer-nominated popularity, child's IQ and parental measures at eight years were used. Results Aggressive children were less intelligent, less popular, rejected more by their parents, had parents who believed in punishment, were less identified with their parents' self-image and were less likely to express guilt. As adults, more aggressive children with parents who were less well educated, experienced more marital disharmony and who seldom attended church were most at risk for arrest. However, after the effect of early aggression was controlled, most effects disappeared and only parents having a strong belief in punishment added significantly to risk of arrest by age 30; the only fact that then reduced the risk of arrest was having parents who attended church often. Both parental authoritarianism and child IQ reduced the risk of conviction for arrested children. Discussion Level of aggression at age eight is the best predictor of criminal events over the next 22 years. A clear implication is that the risk for criminality is affected by much that happens to a boy before he is eight years old. Preventive interventions need to target risk factors that appear to influence the development of early aggression. Copyright 2002 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


    Transforming the Developmental Welfare State in East Asia

    DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE, Issue 3 2005
    Huck-ju Kwon
    This article attempts to explain changes and continuity in the developmental welfare states in Korea and Taiwan within the East Asian context. It first elaborates two strands of welfare developmentalism (selective vs. inclusive), and establishes that the welfare state in both countries fell into the selective category of developmental welfare states before the Asian economic crisis of 1997. The key principles of the selective strand of welfare developmentalism are productivism, selective social investment and authoritarianism; inclusive welfare development is based on productivism, universal social investment and democratic governance. The article then argues that the policy reform toward an inclusive welfare state in Korea and Taiwan was triggered by the need for structural reform in the economy. The need for economic reform, together with democratization, created institutional space in policy-making for advocacy coalitions, which made successful advances towards greater social rights. Finally, the article argues that the experiences of Korea and Taiwan counter the neo-liberal assertion that the role of social policy in economic development is minor, and emphasizes that the idea of an inclusive developmental welfare state should be explored in the wider context of economic and social development. [source]


    Right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation and the dimensions of generalized prejudice: A longitudinal test

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 4 2010
    Frank Asbrock
    Abstract A Dual Process Model (DPM) approach to prejudice proposes that there should be at least two dimensions of generalized prejudice relating to outgroup stratification and social perception, which should be differentially predicted by Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and Social Dominance Orientation (SDO). The current study assessed the causal effects of SDO and RWA on three dimensions of prejudice using a full cross-lagged longitudinal sample (N,=,127). As expected, RWA, but not SDO, predicted prejudice towards ,dangerous' groups, SDO, but not RWA, predicted prejudice towards ,derogated' groups, and both RWA and SDO predicted prejudice towards ,dissident' groups. Results support previously untested causal predictions derived from the DPM and indicate that different forms of prejudice result from different SDO- and RWA-based motivational processes. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Right-wing authoritarianism, Big Five and perceived threat to safety

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2010
    Francesca Dallago
    Abstract Using structural equations modelling, we performed a secondary analysis of the data collected by the Italian Observatory of the North West (Italian national sample, N,=,976) to investigate the direct, mediated and moderated relations connecting the Big Five personality factors and perceived personal and societal threat to safety with right-wing authoritarianism (RWA). Openness, Conscientiousness and perceived societal threat to safety exerted additive effects on RWA; the relation between Openness and RWA was partially mediated by societal threat to safety and that between societal threat to safety and RWA was moderated by Openness. Limitations and possible developments of this research are discussed. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Inter- and intrapersonal processes underlying authoritarianism: The role of social conformity and personal need for structure

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 7 2009
    Philipp Jugert
    Abstract Several personality constructs have been theorised to underlie right-wing authoritarianism (RWA). In samples from New Zealand and Germany (Ns,=,218, 259), we tested whether these constructs can account for specific variance in RWA. In both samples, social conformity and personal need for structure were independent predictors of RWA. In Sample 2, where also openness to experience was measured, social conformity and personal need for structure fully mediated the impact of the higher-order factor of openness on RWA. Our results contribute to the integration of current approaches to the personality basis of authoritarianism and suggest that two distinct personality processes contribute to RWA: An interpersonal process related to social conformity and an intrapersonal process related to rigid cognitive style. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Examining dispositional and situational effects on outgroup attitudes,

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 4 2009
    Joke Meeus
    Two research lines have dominated the quest for the antecedents of outgroup attitudes. Whereas the first has viewed outgroup attitudes as a result of individual differences, the second stressed the importance of the intergroup situation. In order to investigate the interplay of individual differences and situational characteristics, key predictors of the individual differences perspective (i.e. right-wing authoritarianism or RWA, and social dominance orientation or SDO) and the intergroup relations perspective (i.e. ingroup identification and ingroup threat) were simultaneously tested. Two studies revealed additive but no interaction effects of RWA and SDO, ingroup identification and threat. Additionally, Study 1 showed that threat effects remain limited to the outgroup that is portrayed as threatening and do not generalize to other outgroups. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Authoritarianism is good for you: Right-wing authoritarianism as a buffering factor for mental distress

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 1 2009
    Alain Van Hiel
    Abstract Although common knowledge seems to agree that authoritarianism is ,bad to the self', previous studies yielded inconclusive results with respect to the relationship between authoritarianism and mental distress. The present research explores whether the impact of facilitators of mental distress on actual mental distress depends on the level of authoritarianism. Study 1 includes a sample of 132 adults and demonstrated less negative consequences of D-type personality on depression for individuals with high rather than low levels of authoritarianism. Study 2 conducted in a sample of 109 elderly revealed that the effects of negative stressful life events on mental distress were curbed by higher levels of authoritarianism. It is concluded that while previous studies have amply shown that authoritarianism has adverse consequences for other people, these negative effects do not appear to be particularly present for the self. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Parental styles, gender and the development of hope and self-esteem

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 8 2008
    Patrick Heaven
    Abstract We examined the developmental trajectory of trait hope and self-esteem over 4 years and the impact of gender and perceived parental styles on these trajectories. Participants were 884 high school students. There was a general decline in hope and self-esteem over time, with females declining more rapidly than males. Girls had higher hope than boys in Grade 7, but lower hope by Grade 10. Perceived parental authoritativeness at Time 1 was related to high hope across the 4 years, whilst perceived parental authoritarianism was related to low self-esteem. We discuss the importance of perceived parental styles for adolescent well being, as well as possible explanations for changes in hope and self-esteem. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Right wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation and the dimensions of generalized prejudice

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2007
    John Duckitt
    Abstract Prior research suggests that individuals' prejudiced attitudes form a single generalized dimension predicted by Right Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and Social Dominance Orientation (SDO). A dual process approach, however, expects different domains of generalized prejudice that relate differentially to RWA and SDO. To test this, 212 participants rated attitudes to 24 typically disliked groups. Factor analysis revealed three distinct generalized prejudice dimensions. Hierarchical Linear Modelling indicated that attitudes towards a ,dangerous' groups domain was significantly related only with RWA, attitudes toward a second ,derogated' groups domain was related only to SDO, and attitudes toward a third, ,dissident' groups, domain was significantly related to both, but powerfully with RWA and weakly with SDO. These findings have implications for explaining and reducing prejudice. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    A comparison of various authoritarianism scales in Belgian Flanders

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2007
    Alain Van Hiel
    Abstract The present study compared in a Flemish adult sample (N,=,480) four recently developed authoritarianism scales as well as the widely used Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) scale. Results revealed that all these measures were strongly related and that they showed relationships of comparable magnitude with various indicators of right-wing ideology such as conservatism and racism, as well as with political party preferences. Analyses confirmed the superior fit of a multidimensional model for the scales that are assumed to have an explicit underlying multidimensional structure, but it was also revealed that there was little consensus on what these dimensions exactly mean. Finally, the results indicated serious problems of overlap between cultural conservatism and authoritarianism for some of the scales. Having relied exclusively on an empirical method for comparing the utility of these scales, the use of other criteria for a final assessment of the authoritarianism scales is elaborated upon. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Personality, identity styles and authoritarianism: an integrative study among late adolescents

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 5 2006
    Bart Duriez
    Abstract The relations between five personality factors, three identity styles, the prejudice dispositions of right-wing authoritarianism (RWA), social dominance orientation (SDO) and racial prejudice were investigated in a Flemish-Belgian late adolescent sample (N,=,328). Results show that Openness to Experience and Agreeableness relate to racial prejudice but that these relations were fully mediated by RWA and SDO. In addition, results show that whereas RWA relates to Conscientiousness and lack of Openness to Experience, SDO relates to lack of Agreeableness and lack of Openness to Experience. The relation between Conscientiousness and RWA and between Openness to Experience and SDO was fully mediated by the identity styles. However, Openness to Experience had a direct influence on RWA and Agreeableness had a direct influence on SDO. The implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    What matters most to prejudice: Big Five personality, Social Dominance Orientation, or Right-Wing Authoritarianism?

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 6 2004
    Bo Ekehammar
    Whereas previous research has studied the relation of either (i) personality with prejudice, (ii) personality with social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA), or (iii) SDO and RWA with prejudice, the present research integrates all approaches within the same model. In our study (N,=,183), various causal models of the relationships among the Big Five, SDO, RWA, and Generalized Prejudice are proposed and tested. Generalized Prejudice scores were obtained from a factor analysis of the scores on various prejudice instruments (racism, sexism, prejudice toward homosexuals, and mentally disabled people), which yielded a one-factor solution. The best-fitting causal model, which was our suggested hypothetical model, showed that Big Five personality had no direct effect on Generalized Prejudice but an indirect effect transmitted through RWA and SDO, where RWA seems to capture personality aspects to a greater extent than SDO. Specifically, Generalized Prejudice was affected indirectly by Extraversion, Openness to Experience, and Conscientiousness through RWA, and by Agreeableness through SDO, whereas Neuroticism had no effect at all. The results are discussed against the background of previous research and the personality and social psychology approaches to the study of prejudice. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Independent benefits of contact and friendship on attitudes toward homosexuals among authoritarians and highly identified heterosexuals

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
    Gordon Hodson
    Although intergroup contact is generally associated with positive intergroup attitudes, little is known about whether individual differences moderate these relations, or how contact might operate among prejudice-prone individuals. The present investigation explores Person,,Contact and Person,,Friendship interaction patterns among heterosexual university students. As expected, the positive relations of right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) and heterosexual identification with prejudice against homosexuals were weakened when participants reported increased contact, more positive contact, direct (personal) friendships, or indirect friendships (i.e., ingroup friends with outgroup friends) with homosexuals. These patterns held after controlling statistically for each person or situation variable. Contact and friendship exerted smaller or negligible effects among low authoritarians or low identifiers. Tests of indirect effects revealed that among high authoritarians or high identifiers, contact and friendship exerted influence on attitudes through group-level perceptions that homosexuals promote societal values and through increased self,other overlap with gay friends, each otherwise resisted by these individuals. Overall these results suggest that: (a) intergroup contact and intergroup friendship are related but distinct constructs; and (b) past findings underestimate contact effects by collapsing across levels of personal biases. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]