Residential Respite Care (residential + respite_care)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The impact of residential respite care on the behaviour of older people with dementia: literature review

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 1 2007
Christine C. Neville RN, FANZCMHN
Aim., The aim of this review was to examine the impact of residential respite care on the behaviour displayed by older people with dementia. Background., Relocation of older people with dementia to a different care setting could have a negative impact on their behaviour. If such a response is anticipated, a short-term admission to a residential aged care facility for respite care would appear to be futile for the older person and their home caregiver. Therefore, it is important to know what the outcomes of residential respite care are in relation to behaviour for older people with dementia. Methods., A literature search was undertaken and papers emerged from a range of disciplines. The search terms ,respite'; ,respite care'; ,residential respite care'; ,short-stay', ,short-term', ,overnight stays/admissions', ,behav*' and various combinations of these terms were used to find relevant publications in English from Ageline, CINAHL, Medline and, Psychinfo databases dating from 1966. Other key publications were located when searching through the reference lists of retrieved publications. A limited body of literature on residential respite care for older people with dementia was revealed. Results., Six studies were identified, which met the criteria of residential respite care as the intervention and behaviour as an outcome. Conclusions., The studies had a variety of methodological limitations and produced contradictory findings. The strength of the studies was the reporting of outcomes for respite recipients who are usually overlooked in the outcomes for respite research. Relevance to clinical practice., Residential respite care has great anecdotal support but more empirical and evaluative research is needed on outcomes for the respite recipients. [source]


Prevalence of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in community and residential respite care settings

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2007
Christine C. Neville
ABSTRACT:, The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in community and residential respite care settings. The specific objectives were to (i) obtain an estimate of the frequency of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in the community setting before residential respite care; (ii) characterize older people being admitted for residential respite care; and (iii) obtain an estimate of the frequency of disruptive behaviour displayed by older people in residential respite care. A quantitative approach using a cross-sectional survey was employed in the community and in the residential aged care facilities. The older people (n = 100) had a mean age of 81.8 years (range 66,96 years). The older people were being admitted from their homes for booked respite care at residential aged care facilities in a regional Australian city. Home caregivers and nurses rated disruptive behaviour using the Dementia Behaviour Disturbance Scale (DBDS). Reliability data for the DBDS are provided. As expected, in both community and residential respite settings, older people with dementia (29%) scored significantly higher on the DBDS than people without dementia. In addition, DBDS scores were unexpectedly higher in the community setting than in the respite setting. These findings should be taken into consideration by primary health-care professionals when offering treatment options to the home caregivers and by staff in the residential aged care facilities that offer respite. [source]


The impact of residential respite care on the behaviour of older people with dementia: literature review

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 1 2007
Christine C. Neville RN, FANZCMHN
Aim., The aim of this review was to examine the impact of residential respite care on the behaviour displayed by older people with dementia. Background., Relocation of older people with dementia to a different care setting could have a negative impact on their behaviour. If such a response is anticipated, a short-term admission to a residential aged care facility for respite care would appear to be futile for the older person and their home caregiver. Therefore, it is important to know what the outcomes of residential respite care are in relation to behaviour for older people with dementia. Methods., A literature search was undertaken and papers emerged from a range of disciplines. The search terms ,respite'; ,respite care'; ,residential respite care'; ,short-stay', ,short-term', ,overnight stays/admissions', ,behav*' and various combinations of these terms were used to find relevant publications in English from Ageline, CINAHL, Medline and, Psychinfo databases dating from 1966. Other key publications were located when searching through the reference lists of retrieved publications. A limited body of literature on residential respite care for older people with dementia was revealed. Results., Six studies were identified, which met the criteria of residential respite care as the intervention and behaviour as an outcome. Conclusions., The studies had a variety of methodological limitations and produced contradictory findings. The strength of the studies was the reporting of outcomes for respite recipients who are usually overlooked in the outcomes for respite research. Relevance to clinical practice., Residential respite care has great anecdotal support but more empirical and evaluative research is needed on outcomes for the respite recipients. [source]