Residential Care Homes (residential + care_home)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Quality of life of older people in residential care home: a literature review

JOURNAL OF NURSING AND HEALTHCARE OF CHRONIC ILLNE SS: AN INTERNATIONAL INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL, Issue 2 2009
Diana TF Lee MSc, PRD (HCE)
Aim., To integrate the research evidence on quality of life of older people living in a residential care home setting. Background. Residential care is provided for older people who are unable to live in their own home due to various health and social reasons. A number of studies have been published that have focused on diverse quality of life issues of residential care home elders. Consolidating the evidence from these studies may provide insights into enhancing quality of life of this particular group of older people. Design. A literature review of research evidence on quality of life issues among residential care home elders. Method. A systematic search of the literature published between 1994,January 2008 was undertaken to identify research evidence on quality of life of older people living in residential care home. Information about the study design, research objectives, study setting, sample characteristics, and key findings were extracted for comparison and integration. Three aspects about quality of life of the residential care home elders were identified: views of residential care home elders on quality of life, factors affecting quality of life of residential care home elders and methods to improve quality of life in residential care home elders. Results. Eighteen publications were identified. Older people perceived their ability to maintain independence, autonomy and individuality as the most important criteria for determining quality of life. Interventions designed to improve quality of life of older people living in residential facilities corresponded to these criteria. A range of interventions including a walking program, mental stimulation and environmental modification were proposed and evaluated to improve quality of life of residential care home elders. Among these interventions, environmental modification that targeted at improving the residential care homes and quality of services appears to be promising. Conclusion. Quality of life in residential care home elders is a complex issue that may be determined by the elders' independence, individuality and autonomy, and influenced by quality of residential care and facilities. Environmental modification appears to be a way to improve the quality of life of residential care home elders. Relevance to clinical practice. The knowledge of understanding quality of life of residential care home elders provides insights into the implementation of appropriate residential care services. Programs that aim to de-institutionalise the residential care home settings are important to the enhancement of residential care services. [source]


The needs of older people with dementia in residential care

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 1 2006
Geraldine A. Hancock
Abstract Background People with dementia often move into care homes as their needs become too complex or expensive for them to remain in their own homes. Little is known about how well their needs are met within care homes. Method The aim of this study was to identify the unmet needs of people with dementia in care and the characteristics associated with high levels of needs. Two hundred and thirty-eight people with dementia were recruited from residential care homes nationally. Needs were identified using the Camberwell Assessment of Needs for the Elderly (CANE). Results Residents with dementia had a mean of 4.4 (SD 2.6) unmet and 12.1 (SD 2.6) met needs. Environmental and physical health needs were usually met. However, sensory or physical disability (including mobility problems and incontinence) needs, mental health needs, and social needs, such as company and daytime activities, were often unmet. Unmet needs were associated with psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression, but not with severity of dementia or level of dependency. Conclusion Mental health services and residential home staff need to be aware that many needs remain unmet and much can be done to improve the quality of life of the residents with dementia. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Guest Editorial: Privacy and dignity in residential care homes: cross-cultural issues

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 1 2010
Diana T.F. Lee
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Care Standards in Homes for People with Intellectual Disabilities

JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, Issue 3 2008
Julie Beadle-Brown
Background, National minimum standards for residential care homes were introduced following the Care Standards Act 2000 in response to concern about the lack of consistency and poor quality services. These standards are intended to reflect outcomes for service users and to be comprehensive in scope. Method, This study compared ratings made by care standards inspectors with research measures for 52 homes for people with intellectual disabilities serving 299 people. The research measures focused on the lived experience of residential care, including engagement in meaningful activity, choice and participation in activities of daily living. They also included measures of related care practices and organizational arrangements. Results, The research measures were in general significantly correlated with each other. Most of the care standards ratings were also correlated with each other. However, only two of 108 correlations between care standards and research measures were significant. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Conclusions, This study confirms that the review of national minimum standards and modernization of inspection methods recently announced by the Department of Health and the Commission for Social Care Inspection are timely and appropriate. [source]


Quality of life of older people in residential care home: a literature review

JOURNAL OF NURSING AND HEALTHCARE OF CHRONIC ILLNE SS: AN INTERNATIONAL INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL, Issue 2 2009
Diana TF Lee MSc, PRD (HCE)
Aim., To integrate the research evidence on quality of life of older people living in a residential care home setting. Background. Residential care is provided for older people who are unable to live in their own home due to various health and social reasons. A number of studies have been published that have focused on diverse quality of life issues of residential care home elders. Consolidating the evidence from these studies may provide insights into enhancing quality of life of this particular group of older people. Design. A literature review of research evidence on quality of life issues among residential care home elders. Method. A systematic search of the literature published between 1994,January 2008 was undertaken to identify research evidence on quality of life of older people living in residential care home. Information about the study design, research objectives, study setting, sample characteristics, and key findings were extracted for comparison and integration. Three aspects about quality of life of the residential care home elders were identified: views of residential care home elders on quality of life, factors affecting quality of life of residential care home elders and methods to improve quality of life in residential care home elders. Results. Eighteen publications were identified. Older people perceived their ability to maintain independence, autonomy and individuality as the most important criteria for determining quality of life. Interventions designed to improve quality of life of older people living in residential facilities corresponded to these criteria. A range of interventions including a walking program, mental stimulation and environmental modification were proposed and evaluated to improve quality of life of residential care home elders. Among these interventions, environmental modification that targeted at improving the residential care homes and quality of services appears to be promising. Conclusion. Quality of life in residential care home elders is a complex issue that may be determined by the elders' independence, individuality and autonomy, and influenced by quality of residential care and facilities. Environmental modification appears to be a way to improve the quality of life of residential care home elders. Relevance to clinical practice. The knowledge of understanding quality of life of residential care home elders provides insights into the implementation of appropriate residential care services. Programs that aim to de-institutionalise the residential care home settings are important to the enhancement of residential care services. [source]