Recurrent Atrial Fibrillation (recurrent + atrial_fibrillation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Mechanisms of Recurrent Atrial Fibrillation: Comparisons Between Segmental Ostial Versus Circumferential Pulmonary Vein Isolation

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 8 2007
LI-WEI LO M.D.
Background: Electrical isolation of pulmonary veins (PVs) is an effective therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). Both segmental ostial PV ablation and circumferential ablation with PV,left atrial (LA) block have been implicated to eliminate AF. However, the mechanism of the recurrent AF after undergoing either strategy remains unclear. Methods and Results: Of the 73 consecutive patients with symptomatic AF that underwent PV isolation and had recurrences of AF, Group 1 consisted of 46 patients (age 56 13 years old, 35 males) who underwent PV isolation by segmental ostial PV ablation and Group 2 consisted of 27 patients (age 51 11 years old, 24 males) who underwent circumferential ablation with PV,LA block. In Group 1, the earliest ectopic beat or ostial PV potentials were targeted. In Group 2, circumferential ablation with PV,LA block was performed by encircling the extraostial regions around the left and right PVs. During the first procedure, all patients had PV,AF. There was no difference in the non-PV ectopy between Group 1 and Group 2. During the second procedure, the incidence of an LA posterior wall ectopy initiating AF was significantly lower (20% vs. 0%, P = 0.01) in Group 2. There was no difference in the PV ectopy initiating AF during the second procedure. Conclusion: Circumferential ablation of AF with PV,LA block may eliminate the LA posterior wall ectopy and decrease the incidence of LA posterior wall ectopy initiating AF during the second procedure. [source]


The Dormant Epicardial Reconnection of Pulmonary Vein: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Atrial Fibrillation After Pulmonary Vein Isolation

PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 7 2008
SEIICHIRO MATSUO M.D.
The case of a 65-year-old man with recurrent atrial fibrillation after undergoing segmental pulmonary vein isolation caused by the reconnection of previously isolated pulmonary veins is herein reported. Interestingly, frequent ectopic firings in the left superior pulmonary vein conducted to the left atrium, not through its ostium but through the supposed epicardial pathway at the region of the Marshall ligament, which had been absent during the first treatment session. The reisolation of the left superior pulmonary vein by radiofrequency application in the left atrial appendage thus successfully eliminated the occurrence of atrial fibrillation. [source]


Individualized Selection of Pacing Algorithms for the Prevention of Recurrent Atrial Fibrillation: Results from the VIP Registry

PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 2 2006
THORSTEN LEWALTER
Objectives: The VIP registry investigated the efficacy of preventive pacing algorithm selection in reducing atrial fibrillation (AF) burden. Background: There are few data identifying which patients might benefit most from which preventive pacing algorithms. Methods: Patients, with at least one documented AF episode and a conventional antibradycardia indication for pacemaker therapy, were enrolled. They received pacemakers with AF diagnostics and four preventive algorithms (Selection and PreventAF series, Vitatron). A 3-month Diagnostic Phase with conventional pacing identified a Substrate Group (>70% of AF episodes with <2 premature atrial contractions [PACs] before AF onset) and a Trigger Group (,70% of AF episodes with <2 PACs before AF onset). This was followed by a 3-month Therapeutic Phase where in the Trigger Group algorithms were enabled aimed at avoiding or preventing a PAC and in the Substrate Group continuous atrial overdrive pacing was enabled. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients were evaluated. In the Trigger Group (n = 73), there was a statistically significant 28% improvement in AF burden (median AF burden: 2.06 hours/day, Diagnostic Phase vs 1.49 hours/day, Therapy Phase; P = 0.03304 signed-rank test), and reduced PAC activity. There was no significant improvement in AF burden in the Substrate Group (median AF burden: 1.82 hours/day, Diagnostic Phase vs 2.38 hours/day, Therapy Phase; P = 0.12095 signed-rank test), and little change in PAC activity. Conclusions: We identified a subgroup of patients for whom the selection of appropriate pacing algorithms, based on individual diagnostic data, translated into a reduced AF burden. Trigger AF patients were more likely responders to preventive pacing algorithms as a result of PAC suppression. [source]


Role of Residual Potentials Inside Circumferential Pulmonary Veins Ablation Lines in the Recurrence of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 9 2010
Ph.D., YONG-HYUN KIM M.D.
Residual Potentials After Pulmonary Vein Isolation. Background: Residual gaps due to incomplete ablation lines are known to be the most common cause of recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation. We hypothesized that any residual potentials at the junction of the left atrium and pulmonary vein (PV), inside the circumferential PV ablation (CPVA) lines, would contribute to the recurrence of AF or post-AF ablation atrial flutter (AFL); therefore, the elimination of these potentials increases AF-/AFL-free survival rates. Methods and Results: One hundred and two patients with paroxysmal AF (PAF) were enrolled and prospectively randomized to a group with ablation of residual potentials as add-on therapy to CPVA + PV electrical isolation (PVI) (group 1, n = 49), or a group without ablation of the residual potentials (group 2, n = 53). Post-CPVA residual potentials, inside the ablation lines, were identified by contact bipolar electrode mapping catheter and a detailed 3-dimensional voltage map. Twenty-three patients in group 1 and 18 patients in group 2 had post-CPVA residual potentials (46.9% vs 34.0%, P = 0.182). The AF-/AFL-free survival rate during follow-up of 23.3 7.9 months was not different in comparisons between the 2 groups (P = 0.818), and 79.6% and 81.1% of the patients in groups 1 and 2 maintained a sinus rhythm (P = 0.845), respectively. Conclusions: Residual potentials inside CPVA were commonly found in the patients with PAF after CPVA + PVI. Further ablation of residual potentials did not increase the efficacy of catheter ablation in patients with PAF. (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. 21, pp. 959-965, September 2010) [source]


Characterization of a New Pulmonary Vein Variant Using Magnetic Resonance Angiography:

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 5 2004
Imaging, Incidence, Interventional Implications of the "Right Top Pulmonary Vein"
Introduction: Catheter ablation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) for prevention of recurrent atrial fibrillation requires precise anatomic information. We describe the characteristics of a new anatomic variant of PV anatomy using magnetic resonance angiography. Methods and Results: A 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging system with a body coil or a torso phased-array coil was used before and after gadolinium injection. Magnetic resonance angiograms were acquired with a breath-hold three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient-echo imaging sequence in the coronal plane. Three-dimensional reconstruction with maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reformations was performed. A newly described variant PV ascending from the roof of the left atrium was found in 3 of 91 subjects. The mean ostial diameter of the roof PV was 7 2 mm, the mean distance from the ostium to the first branching point was 22 8.5 mm, and the mean distance to the right superior PV was 3.3 0.6 mm. Conclusion: We refer to the newly described variant of PV anatomy as the "right top pulmonary vein." It is important to be aware of this anatomic pattern to avoid inadvertent catheter intubation, which can result in misleading mapping results and PV stenosis. (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. 15, pp. 538-543, May 2004) [source]


The Dormant Epicardial Reconnection of Pulmonary Vein: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Atrial Fibrillation After Pulmonary Vein Isolation

PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 7 2008
SEIICHIRO MATSUO M.D.
The case of a 65-year-old man with recurrent atrial fibrillation after undergoing segmental pulmonary vein isolation caused by the reconnection of previously isolated pulmonary veins is herein reported. Interestingly, frequent ectopic firings in the left superior pulmonary vein conducted to the left atrium, not through its ostium but through the supposed epicardial pathway at the region of the Marshall ligament, which had been absent during the first treatment session. The reisolation of the left superior pulmonary vein by radiofrequency application in the left atrial appendage thus successfully eliminated the occurrence of atrial fibrillation. [source]