Reality

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Reality

  • clinical reality
  • complex reality
  • economic reality
  • historical reality
  • local reality
  • material reality
  • new reality
  • political reality
  • psychic reality
  • social reality
  • virtual reality

  • Terms modified by Reality

  • reality check
  • reality environment
  • reality monitoring
  • reality simulation
  • reality simulator
  • reality technology

  • Selected Abstracts


    FEAR, TV NEWS, AND THE REALITY OF CRIME,

    CRIMINOLOGY, Issue 3 2000
    TED CHIRICOS
    Data from a 1997 survey of 2, 250 Florida residents are used to assess whether and how the reality of crime influences the relationship between watching TV news and fear of crime. Local crime rates, victim experience, and perceived realism of crime news operationalize the reality of crime and are included in ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates of the TV news and fear of crime relationship. These measures of reality are also used as contexts for disaggregating the analysis. Local and national news are related to fear of crime independent of the effects of the reality of crime and other controls. Local news effects are stronger, especially for people who live in high crime places or have recent victim experience. This contextual pattern of findings is consistent with a conclusion that TV news is most influential when it resonates the experience or crime reality of respondents. [source]


    IS IT REALITY OR AN ILLUSION THAT LIQUID-BASED CYTOLOGY IS BETTER THAN CONVENTIONAL CERVICAL SMEARS?

    CYTOPATHOLOGY, Issue 2 2002
    Robin Moseley
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    IS IT REALITY OR AN ILLUSION THAT LIQUID-BASED CYTOLOGY IS BETTER THAN CONVENTIONAL CERVICAL SMEARS?

    CYTOPATHOLOGY, Issue 1 2002
    J. Linder
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    GLOBAL BIOETHICS: UTOPIA OR REALITY?

    DEVELOPING WORLD BIOETHICS, Issue 2 2008
    SIRKKU K. HELLSTEN
    ABSTRACT This article discusses what ,global bioethics' means today and what features make bioethical research ,global'. The article provides a historical view of the development of the field of ,bioethics', from medical ethics to the wider study of bioethics in a global context. It critically examines the particular problems that ,global bioethics' research faces across cultural and political borders and suggests some solutions on how to move towards a more balanced and culturally less biased dialogue in the issues of bioethics. The main thesis is that we need to bring global and local aspects closer together, when looking for international guidelines, by paying more attention to particular cultures and local economic and social circumstances in reaching a shared understanding of the main values and principles of bioethics, and in building ,biodemocracy'. [source]


    The Quest for REALITY

    DIALECTICA, Issue 1 2007
    Paul Horwich
    A widespread concern within philosophy has been, and continues to be, to determine which domains of discourse address real, robust, not-merely-deflationary facts, and which do not. But a threat to the legitimacy of this concern (together with the claims provoked by it) is the extreme lack of consensus amongst philosophers on the question of how to tell whether or not a given domain is oriented towards ,robust reality'. The present paper criticizes Kit Fine's attempt to settle that question. This discussion is followed by some considerations suggesting that there is no good answer to it, that (as the ,quietists' maintain) the notion of ,robust reality' is defective and ought to be abandoned. [source]


    NHS AS STATE FAILURE: LESSONS FROM THE REALITY OF NATIONALISED HEALTHCARE

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 4 2008
    Helen Evans
    The British National Health Service is often held up as a beacon of egalitarian healthcare, funded through general taxation and free at the point of use. Instituted by arguably the most socialist government in British history after World War II, it has manifested all the flaws that might be expected from a state monopoly: waste, inefficiency, under-investment, rationing and constant political interference. The result has been poor health outcomes for British citizens compared with other wealthy countries, and a failure by the NHS to live up to its founding principles of comprehensive, unlimited healthcare and egalitarianism. [source]


    EIFFEL TOWER KEY CHAINS AND OTHER PIECES OF REALITY: THE PHILOSOPHY OF SOUVENIRS1

    PHILOSOPHICAL FORUM, Issue 3 2007
    DANIELLE M. LASUSA
    First page of article [source]


    QUASI-NATURALISM AND MORAL REALITY

    RATIO, Issue 1 2006
    Brad Majors
    In his recent book Moral Reality, Paul Bloomfield has put forward an original set of arguments for moral realism. Central to his treatment is an argument for the reality of moral properties, one which models them on the property of being healthy. The paper is a critical examination of Bloomfield's central line of argument. It is contended that his proposed method of grounding moral realism fails, inasmuch as his Distinction Test criterion for property reality , essentially the claim that a property exists if its existence is required for distinctions that we make and must make , is inadequate. An alternative approach toward properties is suggested, which has the result, inter alia, that Bloomfield's quasi-naturalistic approach is unnecessary for the defense of moral realism.1 [source]


    INTEGRATION IN PSYCHOTHERAPY: AN EVOLVING REALITY IN PERSONALITY DISORDER

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 2 2000
    Anthony W Bateman
    ABSTRACT Psychotherapy continues to be bedevilled by ideological schisms with practitioners apparently ignoring alternative conceptualizations and potentially superior interventions. However, I argue here that there is evidence of a rapprochement, both in theory and in practice, between cognitive therapy and psychoanalytic therapy, especially within the domain of personality disorder, which may lead to the development of integrative psychotherapy. Cognitive therapy has begun to encompass an interpersonal approach within its theoretical base. Similarly, psychoanalytic therapy increasingly uses an interpersonal formulation of the process of therapy. The therapeutic alliance is emphasized equally and process research suggests that interventions, when given by experienced practitioners, are not as dissimilar as,brand-named' therapies imply. Continued refinement of process psychotherapy research could lead to true integration of efficacious therapeutic interventions. But translating research findings into practice will necessitate psychotherapists opening themselves up to each others' ideas. [source]


    The Spatially Splintered State: Myths and Realities in the Regulation of Marine Fisheries in Tamil Nadu, India

    DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE, Issue 4 2003
    Maarten Bavinck
    The spatial dimension of law is a neglected field of study. This article responds to suggestions that have been made to develop a ,geography of law', and investigates expressions of State-centred law regarding common pool natural resources. It asks how variations in law between lower-level territorial units are to be explained in situations where patterns of resource exploitation are similar and the overarching State proclaims an even approach. To explore these issues, the article focuses on a case study of Tamil Nadu marine fisheries. Comparing the reality of State regulation in different coastal districts, the author argues that the State occupies a relatively weak position vis--vis user groups, and strives to maximize its legitimacy by adapting to local political circumstances. The end result is a legal patchwork with strong spatial connotations. [source]


    Global Standards, Local Realities: Private Agrifood Governance and the Restructuring of the Kenyan Horticulture Industry

    ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY, Issue 2 2010
    Stefan Ouma
    abstract Over the past decade, private food safety and quality standards have become focal points in the supply chain management of large retailers, reshaping governance patterns in global agrifood chains. In this article, I analyze the relationship between private collective standards and the governance of agrifood markets, using the EUREPGAP/GLOBALGAP standard as a vantage point. I discuss the impact of this standard on the organization of supply chains of fresh vegetables in the Kenyan horticulture industry, focusing on the supply chain relationships and practices among exporters and smallholder farmers. In so doing, I seek to highlight the often-contested nature of the implementation of standards in social fields that are marked by different and distributed principles of evaluating quality, production processes, and legitimate actions in the marketplace. I also reconstruct the challenges and opportunities that exporters and farmers are facing with regard to the implementation of and compliance with standards. Finally, I elaborate on the scope for action that producers and policymakers have under these structures to retain sectoral competitiveness in a global economy of qualities. [source]


    Boredom, "Trouble," and the Realities of Postcolonial Reservation Life

    ETHOS, Issue 1 2003
    Assistant professor Lori L. Jervis
    Perhaps because of its reputation as an inconsequential emotion, the significance of boredom in human social life has often been minimized if not ignored. Boredom has been theoretically linked to modernity, affluence, and the growing problem of filling "leisure time. "It has also been attributed to the expansion of individualism with its heightened expectations of personal gratification. Whether a reaction to the sensation ofunderstimulation or "overload," boredom appears to be, ultimately, a problem of meaning. In this article, we consider the applicability of these notions to the contemporary American Indian reservation context, examining discourse about boredom as expressed in interviews with members of a northern plains tribe. Of special interest is how boredom figures into the phenomenon of "trouble" (e.g., alcohol and drug abuse, violence, and illegal activities). Although boredom is certainly familiar to various strata of contemporary U.S. society,and arguably part of what it means to be human,we propose that the realities of postcolonial reservation life provide an especially fertile and undertheorized breeding ground for this condition, and our examination of the relationship between boredom and trouble suggests that boredom's implications for both individual subjectivity and group sociality are far from trivial. [source]


    Multiple Realities: A Relational Narrative Approach in Therapy With Black,White Mixed-Race Clients

    FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 2 2003
    Kerry Ann Rockquemore
    Notions of a racial identity for persons with one Black and one White parent have assumed the existence of only a singular identity (first Black and later biracial). Emerging empirical research on racial identity formation among members of this group reveals that multiple identity options are possible. In terms of overall health, the level of social invalidation one encounters with respect to racial self-identification is more important than the specific racial identity selected. Here a relational narrative approach to therapy with Black,White mixed-race clients who experience systematic invalidation of their chosen racial identity is presented through a detailed case illustration. [source]


    Rationing: Constructed Realities and Professional Practices Developing Good Practice in Community Care

    HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, Issue 6 2002
    Jill Manthorpe MA
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Creativity: Delusions, Realities, Opportunities and Challenges

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2009
    John Steers
    This article considers the background and provisions of the New Secondary Curriculum in England. Attention is drawn to the extent of the policy changes by comparing the ten-year old demands of the Swift & Steers ,Manifesto for art in schools' (1999) with the new legislation and guidance. In particular, while there is strong support for overdue recognition of the importance of creativity in the curriculum it is argued that its inclusion remains problematic because the ,risky thinking' involved will be difficult in the many schools that have become risk averse in the face of ever increasing accountability. Nevertheless, there are very significant opportunities for art and design provided a number of key challenges are faced and acted upon. [source]


    Vagal Tone: Myths and Realities

    JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 8 2005
    PHYLLIS K. STEIN Ph.D.
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Institutionalization of the Family and Marriage: Questioning Their Cognitive and Relational Realities

    JOURNAL OF FAMILY THEORY & REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
    Jetse Sprey
    This paper argues that to explain the institutionalization processes named the family and marriage, it is necessary to recognize the ontological distinction between their cognitive and relational realities. Institutionalization is an ordering process analogous to instinct in animal societies. In that capacity the human family and marriage collectively order the care and social placement of offspring. Given the biology of Homo sapiens, the family preceded the onset of the human race by millions of years, whereas marriage, the contract that legitimates the social placement of offspring, represents a strictly cultural aspect of human social evolution. The current state and uncertain future of the cognitive and relational components of the institutions of the family and marriage are addressed. [source]


    Creole Materialities: Archaeological Explorations of Hybridized Realities on a North American Plantation

    JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
    STEPHEN A. MROZOWSKI
    This paper explores the hybridized realities of European, Native American and Afro-Caribbean/Afro-American residents of Sylvester Manor, New York and Constant Plantation, Barbados during the seventeenth century. It draws on archaeological and landscape evidence from two plantations that were owned and operated by different members of the same family during the seventeenth century. One of plantations, known as Sylvester Manor, encompassed all 8,000 acres of Shelter Island, New York. It was established in 1652 primarily to help in the provisioning of two large sugar plantations on Barbados, Constant and Carmichael plantations. Sylvester Manor was operated by Nathaniel Sylvester; an Englishman who spent the first twenty years of life living in Amsterdam where his father was a merchant. Constant and Carmichael plantations were operated by his brother Constant Sylvester. Both the Barbados and New York plantations relied upon a labor force of enslaved Afro-Caribbean's. Archaeological evidence from Sylvester Manor has also revealed that Native American laborers played a prominent role in the daily activities of this northern plantation. Material and landscape evidence reveal the construction of hybridized identities that in the case of Barbados, are still part of the fabric of a postcolonial reality. Evidence from Sylvester Manor provides detailed insights into the construction of hybridized identities under the exigencies of a plantation economy whose global connections are dramatically visible in the archaeological record. [source]


    Sexuality and Safer Sex: The Issues for Lesbians and Bisexual Women

    JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC, GYNECOLOGIC & NEONATAL NURSING, Issue 4 2001
    FAAN, Patricia E. Stevens RN
    Nursing interventions to help women reduce their risk of contracting HIV must be designed from an in-depth understanding of the complex sociocultural patterns of sexuality in particular communities and among specific subgroups. Objective: In this data collection phase of a community-based HIV prevention project, the objective was to understand HIV risk-taking and HIV risk-reduction activities of lesbians and bisexual women. Design: Qualitative field study. Setting: Data were collected in women's bars and dance clubs and at selected lesbian/bisexual community events in San Francisco. Participants: Interviews were conducted with 1,189 racially diverse, socially and sexually active lesbians and bisexual women. Results: Inductive content analysis produced two themes: realities of sexual behavior and sexual expressions and their meanings. Realities of sexual behavior included an assumption that women who have sex with other women cannot get HIV, a lack of familiarity with HIV prevention strategies, inconsistent practice of safer sex with men and/or women, and the negative effect of alcohol or drug use on safer sex efforts. Sexual expressions and their meaning included trust in monogamy, a sense that safer sex practices detracted from intimacy and eroticism, the difficulty of negotiating sexual behaviors with men or women, and dealing with partner resistance to safer sex practices. Conclusions: Specific recommendations for practice are the need for nurses to understand the range and diversity of women's sexual behaviors, to develop skills in conducting inclusive sexual histories, and to develop a comprehensive approach to sexual health. [source]


    Marketing Realities in Continuing Professional Education

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR ADULT & CONTINUING EDUCATION, Issue 86 2000
    Ruth F. Craven
    Effective marketing strategies can promote attendance, enhance the satisfaction of registrants, and help continuing professional education programs meet financial goals. [source]


    UnstructuringChinese Society: The Fictions of Colonial Practice and the Changing Realities of "Land" in the New Territories of Hong Kong

    AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 2 2001
    Eve Darian-Smith
    UnstructuringChinese Society: The Fictions of Colonial Practice and the Changing Realities of "Land" in the New Territories of Hong Kong. Allen Chun. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers, 2000. xi. 348 pp., tables, map, bibliography, appendix, index. [source]


    Review Article: Probiotics for allergic diseases: Realities and myths

    PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 6 2010
    Tsung-Chieh Yao
    Yao T-C, Chang C-J, Hsu Y-H, Huang J-L. Probiotics for allergic diseases: Realities and myths. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010: 21: 900,919. 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S The prevalence of allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis has increased sharply over the past two to three decades in many countries, and allergies are now the most common chronic disease among children throughout the world. In the past few years, probiotics have been advocated for the management of allergic diseases in many parts of the world. Physicians have a responsibility to ensure the efficacy and safety of any products they prescribe or recommend. This article provides a comprehensive overview and a critical interpretation of currently available evidence regarding the role of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases in humans and also discusses several major myths and potential risks associated with the use of probiotics. In the current era of evidence-based medicine, there is still insufficient evidence to recommend probiotics for the prevention of allergic diseases or as part of standard management for any allergic conditions in children. [source]


    An Experimental Study of Opinion on Climate Change: Labile Causalities and Stable Realities

    POLICY STUDIES JOURNAL, Issue 1 2010
    S. E. Bennett
    [source]


    Christian Realism and the New Realities.

    THE HEYTHROP JOURNAL, Issue 4 2010
    By Robin W. Lovin
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism: A Commentary on the Global Realities

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 5 2008
    D. A. Budiani-Saberi
    The extent of organ sales from commercial living donors (CLDs) or vendors has now become evident. At the Second Global Consultation on Human Transplantation of the World Health Organization's (WHO) in March 2007, it was estimated that organ trafficking accounts for 5,10% of the kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. Patients with sufficient resources in need of organs may travel from one country to another to purchase a kidney (or liver) mainly from a poor person. Transplant centers in ,destination' countries have been well known to encourage the sale of organs to ,tourist' recipients from the ,client' countries. [source]


    Structural Adjustment, Spatial Imaginaries, and "Piracy" in Guatemala's Apparel Industry

    ANTHROPOLOGY OF WORK REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
    Kedron Thomas
    Abstract This article examines how urban violence influences the everyday lives of Guatemalan Maya entrepreneurs who make nontraditional clothing to sell in highland markets and Guatemala City. How urban space is imagined and experienced among apparel producers reflects a process of class differentiation linked to Guatemala's entrance into international trade and legal agreements. Realities of uneven access and unequal resource distribution allow some producers to take advantage of formal markets and official networks in the capital city, while others avoid the city streets out of fear. Such inequalities are obscured when entrepreneurs who benefit from urban connections talk about relative success in terms of a moral division between those who engage in brand piracy and those who do not. In line with an official discourse that blames "pirates," gangs, and other marginalized groups for the country's social and economic ills, apparel producers who do not copy popular brands often view those who do as immoral and illegal. The case study presented here is fruitful ground for theorizing how cultural representations of urban space influence market strategies and moral logics amidst processes of economic and legal restructuring. [source]


    Conceptual Dichotomies and Cultural Realities: Gender, Work, and Religion in Highland Guatemala

    ANTHROPOLOGY OF WORK REVIEW, Issue 3 2001
    Christopher L. Chiappari
    First page of article [source]


    Laboring in Cyberspace: Internet Realities and the Future of Work

    ANTHROPOLOGY OF WORK REVIEW, Issue 1 2000
    Dr. Karen L. Michaelson
    First page of article [source]


    An Experimental Study of Opinion on Climate Change: Labile Causalities and Stable Realities

    ASIAN POLITICS AND POLICY, Issue 1 2010
    S. E. Bennett
    [source]


    The Abortion Debate in Mexico: Realities and Stalled Policy Reform

    BULLETIN OF LATIN AMERICAN RESEARCH, Issue 1 2007
    ANDRZEJ KULCZYCKI
    Over 500,000 clandestine abortions occur annually in Mexico, many under unfavourable health conditions. An uneasy silence about this situation has long prevailed. Since the 1970s, abortion has appeared periodically in public discourse and on the decision-making agenda, only for action to be repeatedly postponed. Mobilisation around the abortion issue grew slowly, but debate and controversy became nationwide as the country began to experience systemic change in 2000. Despite increasing political pluralism and growing awareness of the existing problems, for now in Mexico, as elsewhere in Latin America, the question of abortion is not judged sufficiently pressing to merit major policy change. However, improved contraceptive use and the institution of new technologies and post-abortion care are helping to make abortions safer and rarer. [source]