Reading

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences

Kinds of Reading

  • alternative reading
  • blood pressure reading
  • careful reading
  • close reading
  • contemporary reading
  • critical reading
  • different reading
  • early reading
  • first reading
  • glucose reading
  • iop reading
  • l2 reading
  • language reading
  • new reading
  • pressure reading
  • word reading

  • Terms modified by Reading

  • reading ability
  • reading achievement
  • reading acquisition
  • reading comprehension
  • reading comprehension skill
  • reading comprehension test
  • reading culture
  • reading deficit
  • reading development
  • reading difficulty
  • reading disabilities
  • reading disability
  • reading fluency
  • reading frame
  • reading frame encoding
  • reading habit
  • reading impairment
  • reading intervention
  • reading level
  • reading material
  • reading performance
  • reading practice
  • reading problem
  • reading process
  • reading proficiency
  • reading rate
  • reading score
  • reading skill
  • reading speed
  • reading task
  • reading test
  • reading text
  • reading time

  • Selected Abstracts


    A DIAGNOSTIC READING OF SCIENTIFICALLY BASED RESEARCH FOR EDUCATION

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 3 2005
    Thomas A. Schwandt
    This essay offers a diagnosis of what may be at stake in the current preoccupation with defining science-based educational research. The diagnosis unfolds in several readings: The first is a charitable and considerate appraisal that draws attention to the fact that advocating experimental methods as important to a science of educational research is not an inherently evil thing to do. Subsequent readings are grimmer, suggesting more deleterious consequences of the science-based research movement for the entire enterprise of educational practice and research. The central thesis of the essay is that making arguments about method and science the focal point in the current quarrel may be largely beside the point. Instead, educational researchers should join the political and public (not just the academic) conversation about the place of educational science in society and about how science is both implicated in and confronts the politics of what counts as knowledge. [source]


    EARLY MEDIEVAL DAOIST TEXTS: STRATEGIES OF READING AND FUSION OF HORIZONS

    JOURNAL OF CHINESE PHILOSOPHY, Issue 3 2010
    FRIEDERIKE ASSANDRI
    First page of article [source]


    WONDER BETWEEN TWO: AN IRIGARAYAN READING OF GENESIS 2:231

    MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 1 2008
    ROLAND J. DE VRIES
    Luce Irigaray, in the course of engagement with René Descartes, argues that we must return wonder to its first locus,that of sexual difference. I suggest that Irigaray's notion of wonder finds resonance in the poetic declaration of the first man in Genesis 2:23. While the creation narratives affirm the equality of woman and man, they also affirm the irreducibility of woman and man to each other. This insistence on wonder has implication for communicative exchange between woman and man. I also argue, however, against Irigaray, that wonder is as appropriate between humans and God as between the sexes. [source]


    BETWEEN SUBORDINATION AND KOINONIA: TOWARD A NEW READING OF THE CAPPADOCIAN THEOLOGY1

    MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
    NAJEEB G. AWAD
    This article argues that it is inappropriate to read Cappadocian theology exclusively from the angle of Basil of Caesarea's identification of the Godhead with the Father alone. As an alternative to the Basilian-based reading that undermines the view that the three persons are together co-constitutive of the Godhead and restricts the Godhead to the Father alone, this article calls for a more comprehensive reading of the theology of the Cappadocian fathers that takes into consideration the trinitarian perspective of Gregory of Nazianzus, and claims that his understanding of the Godhead as the reciprocal koinonia of the three persons together not only completes and corrects Basil's view and presents a more coherent view of the Cappadocian theology, but also salvages the theology of the Trinity from any possible semi-monarchical logic that could undermine one of the divine persons for the sake of, or at the expense of, the others. [source]


    SETTING FREE THE MOTHER BIRD: ON READING A STRANGE TEXT

    MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 4 2006
    RACHEL MUERS
    Deuteronomy 22:6,7 has been used in recent theological discussions of environmental ethics. Earlier traditions of interpretation (Jewish and Christian) suggest the further possibility of reading it as a text about how to read texts and about the nature and function of law. This article examines, and offers a contemporary Christian reappropriation of, these traditions of interpretation. The focus is on how the confrontation with the vulnerable other as a locus of divine revelation interrupts and transforms relations of use and exploitation. It is argued that in a Christian reading of the bird's-nest precept Christ "does what the precept does". [source]


    SOLIDARITY AND DIFFERENCE: A CONTEMPORARY READING OF PAUL's ETHICS by David G. Horrell, T&T Clark International, London, 2005, Pp.

    NEW BLACKFRIARS, Issue 1010 2006
    £25 pbk.
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    A RESERVED READING OF CARNAP'S AUFBAU

    PACIFIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2005
    CHRISTOPHER PINCOCK
    This paper presents a third "reserved" interpretation that emphasizes Carnap's opposition to traditional philosophy and consequent naturalism. The main consideration presented in favor of the reserved reading is Carnap's work on a physical construction system. I argue that Carnap's construction theory was an empirical scientific discipline and that the basic relations of its construction systems need not be eliminated. [source]


    BOOKS, PRINTS, AND TRAVEL: READING IN THE GAPS OF THE ORIENTALIST ARCHIVE

    ART HISTORY, Issue 3 2008
    ELISABETH A. FRASER
    From about 1780 a thriving publishing industry for travel accounts developed in France, but its rich visual component has not been closely analysed. Taking Auguste de Forbin's Voyage dans le Levant and Marie-Gabriel de Choiseul-Gouffier's Voyage pittoresque de la Grèce as paradigmatic examples, I reconsider illustrated travel books in light of new theories of reading generated by historians of the book. The multifarious nature of these books , juggling word and image, and coordinating the work of a large number of writers, researchers, artists and print-makers , provides a radically alternative model for interpreting travel representation in the age of expansion. [source]


    A PSYCHOANALYTICAL READING OF EURIPIDES, ION: REPETITION, DEVELOPMENT AND IDENTITY

    BULLETIN OF THE INSTITUTE OF CLASSICAL STUDIES, Issue 1 2008
    NAOMI WEISS
    First page of article [source]


    DISCREPANCIES IN T-SCORE READINGS BETWEEN PATIENTS WITH ASYMMETRICAL GAIT

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 4 2008
    Catherine M. Meyer MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    RELIGIOUS HERMENEUTICS: TEXT AND TRUTH IN NEO-CONFUCIAN READINGS OF THE YIJING

    JOURNAL OF CHINESE PHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2007
    ON-CHO NG
    [source]


    Decolonizing Josiah: Toward a Postcolonial Reading of the Deuteronomistic History , By Uriah Y. Kim

    CONVERSATIONS IN RELIGION & THEOLOGY, Issue 1 2008
    Daniel L. Smith-Christopher
    First page of article [source]


    Solidarity and Difference: A Contemporary Reading of Paul's Ethics

    CONVERSATIONS IN RELIGION & THEOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
    Article first published online: 24 APR 200
    Books reviewed: Solidarity and Difference: A Contemporary Reading of Paul's Ethics, David G. Horrell Reviewed by Leslie Houlden Temple Balsall, UK Response to Leslie Houlden By David G. Horrell University of Exeter, UK [source]


    Reading the Sermon the Mount: Character Formation and Decision Making in Matthew 5,7

    CONVERSATIONS IN RELIGION & THEOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
    Article first published online: 11 OCT 200
    Books reviewed: Charles Talbert, Reading the Sermon the Mount: Character Formation and Decision Making in Matthew 5,7 Reviewed by Leslie Houlden [source]


    Reading The Bible From the Margins by Miguel De La Torre

    CONVERSATIONS IN RELIGION & THEOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
    Article first published online: 23 MAY 200
    Reviewed by Leslie Houlden, p.4 Responce by Miguel De La Torre, p.8 [source]


    "We Don't Want No Haole Buttholes in Our Stories": Local Girls Reading the Baby-Sitters Club Books in Hawai,i

    CURRICULUM INQUIRY, Issue 4 2001
    Donna J. Grace
    This study investigates the place of popular cultural texts in the construction of the gendered and cultural subjectivities of seven eight-year-old girls growing up in Hawai,i. Within the context of weekly literature circles held over a period of four months, Grace and Lum sought to understand how these young "local" girls engaged with a book series privileging white, middle-class, mainland values, and how they located themselves within dominant ideologies related to race, culture, and gender. Using qualitative methods, the following questions were addressed: (1) In what ways did the girls identify with particular storylines, subject positions, and views of the world? (2) Were dominant messages accommodated, negotiated, or resisted? (3) What pleasures were produced and experienced in the reading? (4) How were meanings shaped and mediated by "local" culture and the reader's personal histories? The findings suggest that rather than being manipulated by the textual images of femininity, suburban living, and western notions of beauty, the girls had alternative social and cultural discourses with which to negotiate and resist them. These discourses related to notions of the family; gender relations; peer friendships and rivalry; perceptions of beauty; and cultural identity. The findings suggest the importance of local context in understanding textual readings and interpretations. [source]


    "Reading Man Flap" Design for Reconstruction of Circular Infraorbital and Malar Skin Defects

    DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 11 2008
    TAMER SEYHAN MD
    BACKGROUND Surgical complications such as lid retraction and ectropion from graft or flap scar contracture make reconstruction of skin defects in the malar and infraorbital regions challenging. OBJECTIVE A new flap design, the reading man flap, was used to overcome these problems. The Limberg and bilobed flap were compared with the reading man flap. METHODS The reading man flap consists mainly of a superiorly based quadrangular flap and an inferiorly based triangular flap. Malar and infraorbital circular skin defects measuring 14 × 14 to 40 × 40 mm were reconstructed with a reading man flap in 13 patients. The defects occurred after basal cell carcinoma in all patients. The Limberg flap, bilobed flap, and reading man flap were planned for same-sized defects on the abdominoplasty resection material. The results were compared in terms of total scar area, scar length, and total healthy skin area discarded. RESULTS When comparing the 3 flap designs, the reading man flap was the most suitable flap in terms of total scar area and length. CONCLUSION The reading man flap can be used to reconstruct malar and infraorbital circular defects with good cosmetic results and without creating any tractional forces to the eyelids. [source]


    Reading my palm: adventures in medicine

    DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 6 2001
    Helen Horstmann
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Reading Between the Lines

    DIPLOMATIC HISTORY, Issue 2 2004
    Andrew J. Falk
    First page of article [source]


    Monitoring dyslexics' intelligence and attainments: A follow-up study

    DYSLEXIA, Issue 1 2003
    Michael Thomson
    Abstract Intelligence (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children R and III, 1992) and written language attainment (BAS Word Reading, Neale Analysis of Reading, Vernon Graded Word Spelling) data for around 250 children attending a specialist school for dyslexics are presented. The Wechsler scales data show some evidence for ,ACID' and ,SCAD' profile effects on the subtests, with specifically weak Index scores on Freedom from Distractibility and Processing Speed. The relationship between intelligence and reading development is also examined, with evidence for significant correlations between intelligence and written language and a longitudinal study showing that there is no ,Matthew' or drop-off effect in intelligence. The attainments tests demonstrate that the widening gap between a dyslexic's chronological age and his/her attainments can be closed, and how attainments may be monitored within the context of ,growth curves'. The results are discussed in relation to recent reports (e.g. B.P.S. on Dyslexia, Literacy and Psychological Assessment) on the relationship between intelligence and attainments and it is concluded that this report could be seriously misleading for practising educational psychologists. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    The magnocellular theory of developmental dyslexia

    DYSLEXIA, Issue 1 2001
    John Stein
    Abstract Low literacy is termed ,developmental dyslexia' when reading is significantly behind that expected from the intelligence quotient (IQ) in the presence of other symptoms,incoordination, left,right confusions, poor sequencing,that characterize it as a neurological syndrome. 5,10% of children, particularly boys, are found to be dyslexic. Reading requires the acquisition of good orthographic skills for recognising the visual form of words which allows one to access their meaning directly. It also requires the development of good phonological skills for sounding out unfamiliar words using knowledge of letter sound conversion rules. In the dyslexic brain, temporoparietal language areas on the two sides are symmetrical without the normal left-sided advantage. Also brain ,warts' (ectopias) are found, particularly clustered round the left temporoparietal language areas. The visual magnocellular system is responsible for timing visual events when reading. It therefore signals any visual motion that occurs if unintended movements lead to images moving off the fovea (,retinal slip'). These signals are then used to bring the eyes back on target. Thus, sensitivity to visual motion seems to help determine how well orthographic skill can develop in both good and bad readers. In dyslexics, the development of the visual magnocellular system is impaired: development of the magnocellular layers of the dyslexic lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) is abnormal; their motion sensitivity is reduced; many dyslexics show unsteady binocular fixation; hence poor visual localization, particularly on the left side (left neglect). Dyslexics' binocular instability and visual perceptual instability, therefore, can cause the letters they are trying to read to appear to move around and cross over each other. Hence, blanking one eye (monocular occlusion) can improve reading. Thus, good magnocellular function is essential for high motion sensitivity and stable binocular fixation, hence proper development of orthographic skills. Many dyslexics also have auditory/phonological problems. Distinguishing letter sounds depends on picking up the changes in sound frequency and amplitude that characterize them. Thus, high frequency (FM) and amplitude modulation (AM) sensitivity helps the development of good phonological skill, and low sensitivity impedes the acquisition of these skills. Thus dyslexics' sensitivity to FM and AM is significantly lower than that of good readers and this explains their problems with phonology. The cerebellum is the head ganglion of magnocellular systems; it contributes to binocular fixation and to inner speech for sounding out words, and it is clearly defective in dyslexics. Thus, there is evidence that most reading problems have a fundamental sensorimotor cause. But why do magnocellular systems fail to develop properly? There is a clear genetic basis for impaired development of magnocells throughout the brain. The best understood linkage is to the region of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class 1 on the short arm of chromosome 6 which helps to control the production of antibodies. The development of magnocells may be impaired by autoantibodies affecting the developing brain. Magnocells also need high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids to preserve the membrane flexibility that permits the rapid conformational changes of channel proteins which underlie their transient sensitivity. But the genes that underlie magnocellular weakness would not be so common unless there were compensating advantages to dyslexia. In developmental dyslexics there may be heightened development of parvocellular systems that underlie their holistic, artistic, ,seeing the whole picture' and entrepreneurial talents. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Applied Derrida: (Mis)Reading the work of mourning in educational research

    EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEORY, Issue 3 2003
    Patti Lather
    First page of article [source]


    Beyond the Literal: Deferential or Inferential Reading?

    ENGLISH IN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2002
    Isobel Urquhart
    Abstract This article examines the current dilemmas around children's comprehension of written texts in the primary school. National Curriculum tests have shown that questions requiring powers of inference are by far the most difficult for children to answer. Alongside this, recent research has shown that teachers' questioning rarely engages children in inferential thinking. The article argues that, in order to develop ,higher-order' reading skills in the classroom, teachers need to go beyond a deferential approach to both texts and the discourse of the National Literacy Framework in order to promote more creative and imaginative approaches to the comprehension of texts. [source]


    A Bridge Too Far?

    ENGLISH IN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2001
    Floppy Fail the Apprentice Reader, How Biff, Kipper
    Abstract This article is the result of a re-examination of reading scheme books. Taking a literary perspective, the implied reader was investigated in the most popular scheme, The Oxford Reading nee, in order to ascertain how the reader is constructed by the text. It is argued that such texts covertly construct a passive, struggling reader. As such, this has important implications for the National Literacy Strategy, particularly in the selection of texts for Guided Reading. Summary Reading scheme books are designed to bridge the gap between the oral language of the child and the literary language of the book. What is considered important is a recognisable primary world. There is little dialogue yet the language is supposed to reflect that of the child. Short simple sentences devoid of cohesive devices are considered easier to read because the apprentice reader is deemed not to have stamina. Key words such as nouns and verbs are emphasised and little attention is paid to rhythm, hence few elisions and much repetition. As such the reading scheme does not reflect the language of the child for there is little colloquial expression and the lack of literary features actually makes the text very difficult to read. Implied is a reader who is going to find the whole process difficult and has little to bring to the text. On the other hand the children's literature analysed enjoys a variety of narratives and subject matter yet all support the apprentice reader. Such literary texts employ cohesive devices, the third person has a sense of telling with echoes of the oral tradition while those in first person offer a sense of a teller close to the reader. Direct speech is used, which acts as a bridge from the oral to the literary world. The reader is being guided and helped and not left to struggle. Ironically, it is the literary text that offers more support than the supposedly carefully constructed reading scheme. Furthermore, it can be seen that the reading scheme examined constructs a passive reader to whom things happen. The construction of childhood itself is without joy, excitement and wonder. There is a dullness in the text and a dullness in the characters and the plot that constructs a negative view of reading and a negative construction of the child. The model in Figure 1 summarises the difference between the two types of text: Clearly this has implications for texts selected for pupils to read in the National Literacy Strategy, particularly for Guided Reading. There is no shortage in the UK of appropriate, well-written and superbly illustrated children's books that challenge, support and create an interest in literature. It remains a mystery why the dull reading scheme still has such a strong place in the primary classroom. [source]


    Reading, Work, and Catholic Women's Biographies

    ENGLISH LITERARY RENAISSANCE, Issue 3 2003
    Frances E. Dolan
    This essay considers biographies of Catholic women written after their deaths, largely by priests who served as their confessors, and the saints' lives which these biographies took as their models. The purpose of this essay is twofold: to draw attention to a significant body of Catholic writing, and to use this material to shed new light on the one text of this group that has gained considerable critical attention, The Lady Falkland, Her Life, a biography of Elizabeth Cary by one of her daughters, a Benedictine nun. Considering the Life as a participant in a subgenre of Catholic biography reveals the tension between the conventions and precedents available to Cary's biographer, on the one hand, and her intractable subject, on the other. The Life, like other similar biographies, borrows from and verges on hagiography, but is particularly unsuccessful at transforming its subject into a saint. While criticism of Cary and her works continues to dwell on her as eccentric and exceptional, determined by the particularities of her own character and experience, she is as like other female subjects of Catholic biography and hagiography as she is unlike them. This can only be seen by attending to the kinds of texts that Cary and her daughter might well have read, and the parameters they set for writing an eminent Catholic woman's life. These texts figure reading and housework as the chief means by which Catholic women define and sustain their confessional identities in the hostile environment of post-reformation England. [source]


    Hegel's Dialectics as a Semantic Theory: An Analytic Reading

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2007
    Francesco Berto
    First page of article [source]


    Reading the palimpsests of life

    EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 6 2006
    Some relatives bear only the faintest trace of their ancestor.
    First page of article [source]


    Reading Outside the Page

    FAMILY PROCESS, Issue 1 2010
    EVAN IMBER-BLACK
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Computer-Assisted Reading: The Effect of Glossing Format on Comprehension and Vocabulary Retention

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS, Issue 2 2001
    Serafima Gettys
    Two glossing methods are compared. The first method provides readers with sentence-level translation equivalents of the second-language (L2) words. The second method connects the words with their meanings through basic dictionary forms. The main purpose of the study was to determine which of the two glossing formats is more beneficial for text comprehension and vocabulary retention. The results of the study show that retention of lexical items is better aided by reading the text with dictionary-form equivalents of the L2 words, because it involves a deeper level of cognitive processing. The situation is less clear-cut regarding the effect of the two glossing formats on global comprehension. The pedagogical implications of the data obtained are discussed. [source]


    Some Hypotheses on the Nature of Difficulty and Ease in Second Language Reading: An Application of Schema Theory

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS, Issue 6 2000
    Philip C. Hauptman
    A traditional view of difficulty/ease is explained as consisting of two factors: (1) Language (grammar and vocabulary) and (2) Text Length. A modern view of difficulty/ease is then proposed via four hypotheses: (1) The first Primary Ease Factor in L2 reading is background knowledge; (2) Signalling becomes the Primary Ease Factor in L2 reading when background knowledge is not useful for accessing content schemata; (3) Other factors being equal, the degree of signalling determines the degree of accessibility of a text for the L2 reader; and (4) Other factors being equal, Language, Discourse, and Length are of secondary importance , after Background Knowledge and Signalling , for accessing a text by L2 readers. [source]