Reputation

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Business, Economics, Finance and Accounting

Kinds of Reputation

  • auditor reputation
  • company reputation
  • corporate reputation
  • firm reputation
  • underwriter reputation

  • Terms modified by Reputation

  • reputation building
  • reputation capital
  • reputation system

  • Selected Abstracts


    THE DYNAMICS OF SELLER REPUTATION: EVIDENCE FROM EBAY,

    THE JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS, Issue 1 2010
    LUÍS CABRAL
    We construct a panel of eBay seller histories and examine the importance of eBay's reputation mechanism. We find that, when a seller first receives negative feedback, his weekly sales rate drops from a positive 5% to a negative 8%; subsequent negative feedback ratings arrive 25% more rapidly than the first one and don't have nearly as much impact as the first one. We also find that a seller is more likely to exit the lower his reputation is; and that, just before exiting, sellers receive more negative feedback than their lifetime average. [source]


    THE IMPORTANCE OF REPUTATION IN AWARDING PUBLIC CONTRACTS

    ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 4 2006
    Nicola Doni
    ABSTRACT,:,The main economic literature emphasizes that the efficiency of the awarding procedure depends on the contractual rules, especially those regarding firm's remuneration. In this work we show the existence of a reverse link: when the enforcement of contractual terms is imperfect, the rules of the awarding mechanism can help to improve the efficiency of the contractual relationship. In some circumstances, awarding rules based only on bids are not able to deal with the problem of opportunistic behaviour during the execution of the contract. Our model points out that the public administration can incentivize the contractor's fairness by considering not only competitors' bids, but also their different reputation. [source]


    ENVIRONMENTAL CONSCIOUSNESS, REPUTATION AND VOLUNTARY ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTMENT

    AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC PAPERS, Issue 2 2009
    CHIA-YING LIU
    This note attempts to explore the driving force behind firms' voluntary environmental investment and to provide an alternative viewpoint to the traditional notion of environmental investment. We show that, if consumers are environmentally conscious, then firms' environmental investment will enhance their environmentally-based reputation and effectively stimulate consumer demand for the product. Thus, some firms will voluntarily engage in environmental investment. In addition, it is also found that when consumers become more environmentally conscious, in the steady state a high level of environmental investment may be associated with higher output. This result potentially provides an explanation as to why environmental quality may increase with output. [source]


    Reputation Formalization for an Information,Sharing Multi,Agent System

    COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, Issue 4 2002
    Jonathan Carter
    We propose that through the formalization of concepts related to trust, a more accurate model of trust can be implemented. This paper presents a new model of trust that is based on the formalization of reputation. A multidisciplinary approach is taken to understanding the nature of trust and its relation to reputation. Through this approach, a practical definition of reputation is adopted from sociological contexts and a model of reputation is designed and presented. Reputation is defined as role fulfillment. To formalize reputation, it is necessary to formalize the expectations placed upon an agent within a particular multi,agent system (MAS). In this case, the agents are part of an information,sharing society. Five roles are defined along with the ways in which these roles are objectively fulfilled. Through the measurement of role fulfillment, a vector representing reputation can be developed. This vector embodies the magnitude of the reputation and describes the patterns of behavior associated with the direction of the vector. Experiments are conducted to verify the sensibility of the proposed models for role fulfillment and overall reputation. The simulation results show that the roles, defined for building reputation in an information,sharing MAS environment, react to different agent and user actions in a manner consistent with the formal definitions. [source]


    Reputation-based semantic service discovery

    CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 8 2006
    Ali Shaikh Ali
    Abstract An important component of Semantic Grid services is the support for dynamic service discovery. Dynamic service discovery requires the provision of rich and flexible metadata that is not supported by current registry services such as UDDI. We present a framework to facilitate reputation-based service selection in Semantic Grids. Our framework has two key features that distinguish it from other work in this area. First, we propose a dynamic, adaptive, and highly fault-tolerant reputation-aware service discovery algorithm. Second, we present a service-oriented distributed reputation assessment algorithm. In this paper, we describe the main components of our framework and report on our experience of developing the prototype. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Competition and Big 6 Brand Name Reputation: Evidence from the Ontario Municipal Audit Market,

    CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING RESEARCH, Issue 1 2001
    SATI P. BANDYOPADHYAY
    Abstract The 1991 amendment to the auditor appointment requirement of section 86 of the Ontario Municipal Act removes certain barriers to entry into the Ontario municipal audit market. The purpose of this study is to provide evidence that the amendment has enhanced competition in this market. The results indicate that there is a general reduction in the real municipal audit fees compared with the pre-amendment levels, and that the market has become more contestable following the amendment. Notwithstanding the heightened competition, the Big 6 audit firms continue to command audit fee premiums over the non-Big 6 audit firms. This suggests that Big 6 audit fee premiums possibly reflect brand name reputation rather than monopoly/oligopoly rents. [source]


    Discussion of "Competition and Big 6 Brand Name Reputation: Evidence from the Ontario Municipal Audit Market",

    CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING RESEARCH, Issue 1 2001
    DANIEL B. THORNTON
    First page of article [source]


    Reputation and international cooperation: sovereign debt across three centuries

    ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2009
    Marc Flandreau
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Employers, Quality and Standards in Higher Education: Shared Values and Vocabularies or Elitism and Inequalities?

    HIGHER EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2007
    Louise Morley
    This paper is based on a research project funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England which investigated employers' needs for information on higher education quality and standards. A key issue was identifying the type of knowledge that employers utilise in graduate recruitment. A finding of the study was that information on quality and standards was being used by some employers in a way that could undermine equity and widening participation initiatives. Whereas employers reported that, in initial recruitment, they placed least emphasis on information about quality and standards and most emphasis on graduates' interpersonal and communication skills, over a quarter used league tables/Top 20 lists in their decision-making processes and 80 per cent of employers cited the importance of the reputation of the higher education institution in their decision making about marketing and individual recruitment of graduates. Reputation was based on real or imagined league tables, ,grapevine' knowledge, personal, regional and professional networks, performance of past graduates and prejudice against new universities. The hierarchy of opportunity within the labour market often appeared to correspond to a highly stratified higher education sector. [source]


    Corporate Governance, Audit Firm Reputation, Auditor Switches, and Client Stock Price Reactions: The Andersen Experience

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDITING, Issue 3 2010
    Sharad C. Asthana
    The financial scandal surrounding the collapse of Enron caused erosion in the reputation of its auditor, Arthur Andersen, leading to concerns about Andersen's ability to continue in existence and ultimately to the firm's demise. In this paper we investigate the role of corporate governance on the timing of the auditor switch by former Andersen clients. After controlling for factors associated with switching costs, we find clients with strong corporate governance were more likely to switch early. We also find that clients switching from Andersen experienced positive abnormal returns during the three-day window surrounding the announcement of the switch. We attribute this positive response to the reduction in uncertainty associated with the cost of finding a new auditor. [source]


    Private Equity Syndication: Agency Costs, Reputation and Collaboration

    JOURNAL OF BUSINESS FINANCE & ACCOUNTING, Issue 5-6 2009
    Miguel Meuleman
    Abstract:, Syndicates are a form of inter-firm alliance in which two or more private equity firms invest together in an investee firm and share a joint pay-off, and are an enduring feature of the leveraged buyout (LBO) and private equity industry. This study examines the relationship between syndication and agency costs at the investor-investee level, and the extent to which the reputation and the network position of the lead investor mediate this relationship. We examine this relationship using a sample of 1,122 buyout investments by 80 private equity companies in the UK between 1993 and 2006. Our findings show that where agency costs are highest, and hence ex-post monitoring by the lead investor is more important, syndication is less likely to occur. The negative relationship between agency costs and syndication, however, is alleviated by the reputation and network position of the lead investor firm. [source]


    Reputation, Trust, and Rebates: How Online Auction Markets Can Improve Their Feedback Mechanisms

    JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS & MANAGEMENT STRATEGY, Issue 2 2010
    Lingfang (Ivy) LiArticle first published online: 13 MAY 2010
    Reputation systems constitute an important institution, helping sustain trust in online auction markets. However, only half of buyers leave feedback after transactions, and nearly all feedback is positive. In this paper, I propose a mechanism whereby sellers can provide rebates (not necessarily in monetary form) to buyers contingent upon buyers' provision of reports. Using a game theoretical model, I show how the mechanism can increase unbiased reporting. There exists a pooling equilibrium where both good and bad sellers choose the rebate option, even though their true types are revealed through feedback. The mechanism also induces bad sellers to improve the quality of the contract. [source]


    Reputation When Threats and Transfers Are Available

    JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS & MANAGEMENT STRATEGY, Issue 3 2007
    Ernesto Dal Bó
    We present a model where a long run player is allowed to use both money transfers and threats to influence the decisions of a sequence of short run players. We show that threats might be used credibly (even in arbitrarily short repeated games) by a long-lived player who gains by developing a reputation of carrying out punishments. Particular cases of the model are a long-lived pressure group offering rewards and punishments to a series of targets (public or corporate officials) in exchange for policy favors, or that of a long-lived extorter who demands money in order not to punish. We use the model to analyze the "convicted nonpayor" debate around judicial corruption. The model highlights formal similarities between lobbying and extortion. [source]


    Placing "Standard of Care" in Context: The Impact of Witness Potential and Attorney Reputation in Medical Malpractice Litigation

    JOURNAL OF EMPIRICAL LEGAL STUDIES, Issue 3 2006
    Catherine T. Harris
    Previous empirical studies have speculated about the role that factors other than negligence play in the resolution of medical malpractice claims. The present study identifies and evaluates the impact of three "strategic variables" in the medical malpractice litigation process: the witness potential of the defendant physician, the witness potential of the plaintiff, and the reputation of the plaintiff's attorney. These factors, unrelated to standard of care, make a difference in the outcome of medical malpractice cases. Data were collected from insurance company files on cases filed in the North Carolina state courts between 1991 and 1995. Analyses revealed that when the insurers' outside (physician) reviewers rated liability as probable, based on standard of care, settlement occurred in most of the cases. However, when liability was rated as uncertain or unlikely, strategic variables such as perceived witness potential and the reputation of the plaintiff's counsel were significant predictors of case outcome. Cases in which the defendant physician had a strategic advantage were much less likely to settle, while cases in which the plaintiff had a strategic advantage were much more likely to settle. [source]


    Corporate Reputation and Social Performance: The Importance of Fit

    JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 3 2006
    Stephen J. Brammer
    abstract Utilizing data on a sample of large firms, we estimate a model of corporate reputation. We find reputation, derived from the assessments of managers and market analysts, to be determined by a firm's social performance, financial performance, market risk, the extent of long-term institutional ownership, and the nature of its business activities. Furthermore, the reputational effect of social performance is found to vary both across sectors, and within sectors across the various types of social performance. Specifically, our results demonstrate the need to achieve a ,fit' among the types of corporate social performance undertaken and the firm's stakeholder environment. For example, a strong record of environmental performance may enhance or damage reputation depending on whether the firm's activities ,fit' with environmental concerns in the eyes of stakeholders. [source]


    Reputation and Relevance of Economics Journals

    KYKLOS INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, Issue 2 2003
    Michael Bräuninger
    Summary We analyse the interrelationship between economics journals' relevance and reputation. While reputation and relevance positively affect each other, relevance has a much stronger impact on reputation than reputation on relevance. Citation frequency is a key determinant for both journal reputation and relevance, but effects on journal reputation are nearly twice as strong. Specialised journals are, ceteris paribus, considered less relevant and, therefore, also less reputed, even though specialisation has a positive direct effect on reputation. German-speaking economists find German journals more relevant, but at the same time also less reputed than foreign journals. Age and volume effects are also analysed. [source]


    Learning to Dispute: Repeat Participation, Expertise, and Reputation at the World Trade Organization

    LAW & SOCIAL INQUIRY, Issue 3 2010
    Joseph A. Conti
    This mixed-method analysis examines the effects of repeat participation on disputing at the World Trade Organization (WTO). Differences between disputants in terms of their experience with WTO disputing processes affect the likelihood of a dispute transitioning to a panel review in distinct ways, depending upon the configuration of the parties. More experienced complainants tend to achieve settlements, while more experienced respondents tend to refuse conciliation. Strategies of experienced respondents are derived from the expertise generated from repeated direct participation and the normalcy of disputing for repeat players as well as the benefits accruing from a reputation for being unlikely to settle. Repeat players also seek to avoid disputes expected to produce unfavorable jurisprudence but do not actively try to create new case law through the selection of disputes. This research demonstrates a dynamic learning process in how parties use international legal forums and thus extends sociolegal scholarship beyond the nation-state. [source]


    Market Uncertainty and Socially Embedded Reputation

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
    Harris H. Kim
    Both economists and sociologists generally recognize the importance of reputation in coordinating economic transactions. In a perfectly competitive and anonymous market characterized by faceless buyers and sellers, the issue of reputation would be irrelevant and unnecessary. In reality, however, markets are often filled with varying degrees of information asymmetry, which can threaten the very existence of the market system itself. In critical reaction to the standard neoclassical model, some economists, on the one hand, argue that when there is an information problem, reputation serves as a valuable source of market signal of quality. Sociologists of economic life similarly contend that reputation, along with trust, is critical in lowering transaction costs and thereby facilitating various economic activities among individual actors. The purpose of this article is to apply this broad theoretical observation to a specific empirical phenomenon. It does so by highlighting the role of social networks that connect actors on both demand and supply sides of the market. Specifically, this study examines how interpersonal networks in the market for legal services affect the duration of ties between buyers and sellers. Quantitative analysis based on a random sample of Chicago lawyers, a project funded by the American Bar Foundation, reveals that ceteris paribus the lawyer-client relations are significantly driven by social network factors. [source]


    Rationalist and Constructivist Perspectives on Reputation

    POLITICAL STUDIES, Issue 1 2007
    J. C. Sharman
    This article argues for a new and broader understanding of reputation as a generally shared belief concerning a referent's character or nature, based on a range of information, associations and social cues. This is in place of the conventional rationalist definition of this concept as the degree to which an actor reliably upholds its commitments, based on a record of past behaviour. A brief literature review shows that this concept is crucial in underpinning a wide range of work in political science and economics premised on strategic interaction. The difference between a rationalist and constructivist understanding of reputation hinges on three points. Firstly, reputation is argued to be a relational concept rather than a property concept. Secondly, reputation is a social fact with an emergent, intersubjective quality, not just a collection of individual beliefs. Thirdly, rather than being an inductively derived objective record of past behaviour, reputation is based on associations, feelings and social cues. The last section of the article applies this broader conceptual understanding to two empirical examples: the importance of international organisations' reputation for their influence over policy-makers, and the way in which small states are classified as tax havens by a reputation test. [source]


    Thomas Jefferson: Reputation and Legacy , By Francis D. Cogliano

    PRESIDENTIAL STUDIES QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2008
    Steven E. Siry
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    On Reputation: A Microfoundation of Contract Enforcement and Price Rigidity,

    THE ECONOMIC JOURNAL, Issue 536 2009
    Ernst Fehr
    We study the impact of reputational incentives in markets characterised by moral hazard problems. Social preferences have been shown to enhance contract enforcement in these markets, while at the same time generating considerable wage and price rigidity. Reputation powerfully amplifies the positive effects of social preferences on contract enforcement by increasing contract efficiency substantially. This effect is, however, associated with a considerable bilateralisation of market interactions, suggesting that it may aggravate price rigidities. Surprisingly, reputation in fact weakens the wage and price rigidities arising from social preferences. Thus, in markets characterised by moral hazard, reputational incentives unambiguously increase mutually beneficial exchanges, reduce rents, and render markets more responsive to supply and demand shocks. [source]


    Games Parents and Adolescents Play: Risky Behaviour, Parental Reputation and Strategic Transfers,

    THE ECONOMIC JOURNAL, Issue 528 2008
    Lingxin Hao
    This article examines parental reputation formation in intra-familial interactions. In a repeated two-stage game, children decide whether to drop out of high school or daughters decide whether to have births as teens and parents then decide whether to provide support to their children beyond age 18. Drawing on Milgrom and Roberts (1982) and Kreps and Wilson (1982), we show that, under certain conditions, parents have the incentive to penalise older children for their adolescent risk-taking behaviour in order to dissuade their younger children from such behaviour when reaching adolescence. We find evidence in favour of this parental reputation model. [source]


    Reputation for Product Innovation: Its Impact on Consumers,

    THE JOURNAL OF PRODUCT INNOVATION MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2010
    David H. Henard
    Just as firms compete for customers, they also vie for reputational status across their relevant constituent groups. To many firms, a reputation as an innovative company is something that is both prized and actively sought after. Despite an abundance of anecdotal evidence pointing to several firms' active pursuit of an innovative reputation, there is little empirical evidence to evaluate the soundness of this pursuit. On a general level, this research recognizes that firms compete for competitive advantage via their tangible and intangible resources. Much of the innovation literature centers on the tangible impact that new product development initiatives have on outcomes of innovation. Yet research investigations of the less tangible facets of innovation, such as a reputation, remain relatively uninvestigated despite their promise as a source of sustainable competitive advantage. This study investigates the effects of a corporate reputation for product innovation (RPI) and its impact on consumers. Consumer involvement levels are proposed to mediate the relationship between RPI and consumer outcomes. Empirical results indicate that a high consumer perceived RPI, via the involvement construct, leads to excitement toward and heightened loyalty to the innovative firm. A more positive overall corporate image and tolerance for occasional product failures are also positive outcomes noted in the results. Contrary to expectations, a high perceived RPI does not lead to a consumer propensity to pay price premiums. [source]


    Corporate Reputation and Women on the Board

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2009
    Stephen Brammer
    In this paper, we investigate the determinants of corporate reputation, derived from the assessments of managers and market analysts, of a sample of large UK firms. Along with the influences of a variety of firm attributes, we find a reputational effect associated with a female presence at board level. This effect varies across sectors and demonstrates the influence of a firm's stakeholder environment in determining whether a female presence on the board enhances or harms the reputation of the firm. The pattern that emerges indicates that the presence of women on the board is favourably viewed in only those sectors that operate close to final consumers. We argue that the nature of this effect reflects an imperative for equality of representation that highlights the need to reflect gender diversity among customers. [source]


    Reading the Tea Leaves,Did Citigroup Risk Their Reputation During 2004,2005?

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 2 2008
    2007 Baruch College, New York City, Presented at ICAA's Second International Conference Globalization, The Good Corporation June 2
    ABSTRACT In this paper, we challenge the conventional wisdom that high-quality news reports of questionable corporate business practices will stimulate various marketplace negative responses, which in turn, will pressure management to undertake actions designed to protect the organization's reputation. Analysis is confined to a relatively brief period of bad news relating to Citigroup, Inc. We conclude that while none of the expected negative marketplace responses are evident in widely available news sources, the CEO did exhibit significant concern and instituted a targeted reputation risk management program. In the absence of a concerned CEO, analysts should not, we suggest, expect a management team to respond with reputation-enhancing corrective action solely as a reaction to negative publicity regarding questionable business practices. [source]


    The Multiple Bottom Lines of Corporate Citizenship: Social Investing, Reputation, and Responsibility Audits

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 3 2000
    Sandra Waddock
    First page of article [source]


    Using Flexible Taste Distributions to Value Collective Reputation for Environmentally Friendly Production Methods

    CANADIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2008
    Riccardo Scarpa
    In this paper, we investigate consumer preferences for various environmentally friendly production systems for carrots. We use discrete choice multi-attribute stated preference data to explore the effect of the collective reputation of growers from an Alpine valley with an established reputation for its environmentally friendly production: Val di Gresta ,the valley of organic orchards.' Data analysis of the panel of discrete responses identifies unobserved taste heterogeneity for organic, biodynamic, and place of origin along with extra variance associated with experimentally designed alternatives. The assumed parametric taste distributions are each tested using the semi-nonparametric specification proposed by Fosgerau and Bierlaire, while the null of normality cannot be rejected for organic and biodynamic production methods, though it is for the place of origin. The latter is found to be bi-modal, with modes at each side of zero. The use of a flexible taste distribution increases the plausibility of this form of heterogeneity and it appears promising for future applied studies. Dans le présent article, nous avons examiné les préférences des consommateurs quant à divers systèmes de production écologiques de carottes. Nous avons utilisé des données sur les préférences déclarées, la valeur attendue et les choix discrets pour examiner l'effet de la réputation collective de producteurs dans une vallée alpine réputée pour sa production écologique: Val di Gresta, dite la ,vallée des vergers biologiques,. L'analyse des données de panel discrètes a fait ressortir une hétérogénéité inobservable des goûts quant à la culture biologique, la culture biodynamique et le lieu d'origine ainsi qu'une variance supplémentaire liée à des options expérimentalement conçues. Les distributions paramétriques hypothétiques des goûts sont testées à l'aide de la spécification semi-non-paramétique proposée par Fosgerau and Bierlaire (2007), tandis que l'hypothèse nulle de normalité(null of normality) ne peut être rejetée pour les méthodes de production biologique et biodynamique, bien qu'elle le soit pour le lieu d'origine. Cette dernière serait bimodale, avec des modes de chaque côté de zéro. L'utilisation d'une distribution des goûts souple augmente la plausibilité de cette forme d'hétérogénéité et semble prometteuse pour les études appliquées futures. [source]


    Imperfect Monitoring and Impermanent Reputations

    ECONOMETRICA, Issue 2 2004
    Martin W. Cripps
    We study the long-run sustainability of reputations in games with imperfect public monitoring. It is impossible to maintain a permanent reputation for playing a strategy that does not play an equilibrium of the game without uncertainty about types. Thus, a player cannot indefinitely sustain a reputation for noncredible behavior in the presence of imperfect monitoring. [source]


    Manufacturing Reputations in Late Eighteenth-Century Birmingham

    HISTORICAL RESEARCH, Issue 181 2000
    Nigel Stirk
    This article examines the importance of local reputation and collaborative commercial politics for the business practices of individuals in industrializing Birmingham. It is suggested that shared ideas about quality standards, free trade and the national interest were instrumental in encouraging businessmen to work together to establish local representative institutions. Furthermore, these normative conceptions of how trade should be conducted reflected particular interpretations of the history of Birmingham and of individual enterprise. It is concluded that the particular geography of a provincial town was central to the application of principles and abstract ideas. [source]


    Reputation Formalization for an Information,Sharing Multi,Agent System

    COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, Issue 4 2002
    Jonathan Carter
    We propose that through the formalization of concepts related to trust, a more accurate model of trust can be implemented. This paper presents a new model of trust that is based on the formalization of reputation. A multidisciplinary approach is taken to understanding the nature of trust and its relation to reputation. Through this approach, a practical definition of reputation is adopted from sociological contexts and a model of reputation is designed and presented. Reputation is defined as role fulfillment. To formalize reputation, it is necessary to formalize the expectations placed upon an agent within a particular multi,agent system (MAS). In this case, the agents are part of an information,sharing society. Five roles are defined along with the ways in which these roles are objectively fulfilled. Through the measurement of role fulfillment, a vector representing reputation can be developed. This vector embodies the magnitude of the reputation and describes the patterns of behavior associated with the direction of the vector. Experiments are conducted to verify the sensibility of the proposed models for role fulfillment and overall reputation. The simulation results show that the roles, defined for building reputation in an information,sharing MAS environment, react to different agent and user actions in a manner consistent with the formal definitions. [source]