Query Expansion (query + expansion)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


SEARCHING FOR EXPLANATORY WEB PAGES USING AUTOMATIC QUERY EXPANSION

COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, Issue 1 2007
Manabu Tauchi
When one tries to use the Web as a dictionary or encyclopedia, entering some single term into a search engine, the highly ranked pages in the result can include irrelevant or useless sites. The problem is that single-term queries, if taken literally, underspecify the type of page the user wants. For such problems automatic query expansion, also known as pseudo-feedback, is often effective. In this method the top n documents returned by an initial retrieval are used to provide terms for a second retrieval. This paper contributes, first, new normalization techniques for query expansion, and second, a new way of computing the similarity between an expanded query and a document, the "local relevance density" metric, which complements the standard vector product metric. Both of these techniques are shown to be useful for single-term queries, in Japanese, in experiments done over the World Wide Web in early 2001. [source]


Mining related queries from Web search engine query logs using an improved association rule mining model

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 12 2007
Xiaodong Shi
With the overwhelming volume of information, the task of finding relevant information on a given topic on the Web is becoming increasingly difficult. Web search engines hence become one of the most popular solutions available on the Web. However, it has never been easy for novice users to organize and represent their information needs using simple queries. Users have to keep modifying their input queries until they get expected results. Therefore, it is often desirable for search engines to give suggestions on related queries to users. Besides, by identifying those related queries, search engines can potentially perform optimizations on their systems, such as query expansion and file indexing. In this work we propose a method that suggests a list of related queries given an initial input query. The related queries are based in the query log of previously submitted queries by human users, which can be identified using an enhanced model of association rules. Users can utilize the suggested related queries to tune or redirect the search process. Our method not only discovers the related queries, but also ranks them according to the degree of their relatedness. Unlike many other rival techniques, it also performs reasonably well on less frequent input queries. [source]


Query expansion behavior within a thesaurus-enhanced search environment: A user-centered evaluation

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 4 2006
Ali Shiri
The study reported here investigated the query expansion behavior of end-users interacting with a thesaurus-enhanced search system on the Web. Two groups, namely academic staff and postgraduate students, were recruited into this study. Data were collected from 90 searches performed by 30 users using the OVID interface to the CAB abstracts database. Data-gathering techniques included questionnaires, screen capturing software, and interviews. The results presented here relate to issues of search-topic and search-term characteristics, number and types of expanded queries, usefulness of thesaurus terms, and behavioral differences between academic staff and postgraduate students in their interaction. The key conclusions drawn were that (a) academic staff chose more narrow and synonymous terms than did postgraduate students, who generally selected broader and related terms; (b) topic complexity affected users' interaction with the thesaurus in that complex topics required more query expansion and search term selection; (c) users' prior topic-search experience appeared to have a significant effect on their selection and evaluation of thesaurus terms; (d) in 50% of the searches where additional terms were suggested from the thesaurus, users stated that they had not been aware of the terms at the beginning of the search; this observation was particularly noticeable in the case of postgraduate students. [source]