Psychiatric Inpatient Care (psychiatric + inpatient_care)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Psychiatric inpatient care for adults with intellectual disabilities: generic or specialist units?

JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 1 2004
K. Xenitidis
Abstract Background When adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) require a psychiatric admission, general adult mental health units are often used. Specialist units have emerged recently as a care option but there is only limited evidence of their effectiveness. Thus this study aims to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of a specialist inpatient unit and report on the utilization of generic and specialist inpatient services. Method All patients admitted to a specialist ID psychiatric unit were evaluated on admission and immediately after discharge on a number of outcome measures. In addition, they were compared with those admitted to general adult mental health units covering the same catchment area. Results Significant improvements were demonstrated within the specialist unit cohort on measures including psychopathology, global level of functioning, behavioural impairment and severity of mental illness. The specialist unit patients had a longer length of inpatient stay but were less likely to be discharged to out-of-area residential placement. Conclusions Specialist units are an effective care option for this group of people. [source]


Factors associated with the coping of parents with a child in psychiatric inpatient care

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 5 2001
Tiina Puotiniemi MSc
The purpose of this study was to establish the parental coping' factors associated with having a child in psychiatric inpatient care. The data were collected from 19 hospitals with child psychiatry units. At the time of data collection, all parents of children in psychiatric inpatient care in these hospitals were recruited. The method of data collection was a questionnaire (n = 79). The data were analysed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows statistical software. The connections between variables were studied with cross-tabulation, and the ,2 test was used to determine significance. Changes in internal and external family relationships and matters related to the upbringing of the child with mental problems statistically correlated significantly with parental coping (P < 0.001). Problem-oriented and emotionally-oriented coping strategies, skills and palliative strategies correlated significantly with parental coping (P < 0.001). Emotional support, support for the care and upbringing of the child in inpatient care, and love and acceptance also had statistically significant associations with parental coping (P < 0.001). [source]


Nurse staffing, bed numbers and the cost of acute psychiatric inpatient care in England

JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 8 2008
L. BOWERS rmn phd
The aim of this analysis was to describe the composition, variability and factors associated with nurse staffing costs in acute psychiatric inpatient care. Numbers of acute inpatient beds in England have fallen, creating an occupancy crisis. Numbers of acute inpatient nursing staff are linked to quality of care. Variance in staffing and beds has considerable resource implications, but little is known about how these costs are structured. The sample comprised survey data from 136 wards in 26 NHS Trusts, matched with nationally available data on service levels, population and outcomes. The cost of providing acute inpatient care varied fivefold between different Trusts. This variation comprised of numbers of beds/population, numbers of nurses/beds and the proportion of nurses qualified. These variations were not fully accounted for by differing levels of social deprivation. Although service provision levels in London were higher, wide variation in costs existed in every region. Associations between nursing cost per bed and performance indicators were found. As investment in acute inpatient care varies widely, we need to know much more about the relationship of inputs to outputs, so that empirically based standard service levels can be defined. [source]


,Shared-rhythm cooperation' in cooperative team meetings in acute psychiatric inpatient care

JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2004
P. VUOKILA-OIKKONEN rn phd
The cooperative team meeting is one of the most important interventions in psychiatric care. The purpose of this study was to describe the participation of patients and significant others in cooperative team meetings in terms of unspoken stories. The narrative approach focused on storytelling. The data consisted of videotaped cooperative team meetings (n = 11) in two acute closed psychiatric wards. The QRS NVivo computer program and the Holistic Content Reading method were used. During the process of analysis, the spoken and unspoken stories were analysed at the same time. According to the results, while there was some evident shared-rhythm cooperation (the topics of discussion were shared and the participants had eye contact), there were many instances where the interaction was controlled and defined by health care professionals. This lack of shared rhythm in cooperation, as defined in terms of storytelling, was manifested as monologue and the following practices: the health care professionals controlled the storytelling by sticking to their opinions, by giving the floor or by pointing with a finger and visually scanning the participants, by interrupting the speaker or by allowing the other experts to sit passively. Implications for mental health nursing practice are discussed. [source]


The resources of parents with a child in psychiatric inpatient care

JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 1 2002
T. A. PUOTINIEMI MSc RN
The purpose of this study was to analyse and describe the resources of parents with a child in psychiatric inpatient care. The factors associated with parental coping were also assessed. The data were collected from 19 hospitals with a child psychiatry unit. At the time of data collection, all the parents of the children in psychiatric inpatient care in these hospitals were invited to participate in the study (N = 268). The method of data collection was a questionnaire including open-ended questions. The response percentage was 30% (N = 79). The data were analysed using SPSS software. The replies to the open-ended questions were analysed utilizing data-based content analysis. The findings indicated that the parents received more emotional than instrumental support. Few got financial support. The parents got support from their spouses, families, friends and fellow-workers and the health care personnel. Nearly half of the parents wanted more support from health care personnel. Of the different kinds of social support reported, emotional support, support in the care and rearing of the child in inpatient care, love and acceptance correlated most strongly with parental coping. [source]