Project Management (project + management)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Business, Economics, Finance and Accounting

Terms modified by Project Management

  • project management practice

  • Selected Abstracts


    DISCIPLINING THE PROFESSIONAL: THE CASE OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT*

    JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 6 2002
    DAMIAN HODGSON
    Despite its rapid growth in recent years, Project Management has received very little critical attention, particularly when compared to the more ,hyped' managerial fashions such as TQM (cf. Wilkinson and Willmott, 1995) and BPR (cf. Grey and Mitev, 1995; Grint, 1994). My intention in this paper is to critically examine the ongoing construction of Project Management as a professional discipline in modern organizations. Drawing on an understanding of ,discipline' based in Foucauldian work, I will briefly trace the historical construction of Project Management as a form of managerial knowledge, outlining the key models and techniques which make up contemporary Project Management. Through an empirical study of the articulation and reproduction of Project Management within two Financial Services institutions, the everyday construction of Project Management as an ,objective' and ,abstract' body of knowledge will be described. I then contrast this with the embodied and power-laden operation of Project Management, with disciplinary effects not only on those employees whose work is restructured in line with Project Management principles but equally upon self-professed Project Management professionals themselves. [source]


    A Simulation Model for Life Cycle Project Management

    COMPUTER-AIDED CIVIL AND INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING, Issue 3 2002
    Ali Jaafari
    This paper puts forward a simulation model specifically designed for holistic evaluation of project functionality within a life cycle project management framework. The authors describe a methodology for development of the aforementioned tool, referred to as a dynamic simulation modeling system (DSMS). The DSMS is geared toward modeling of service and manufacturing processes with hierarchical and modular modeling methodology; however, the underlying philosophy can be adopted for modeling any generic system. The enhanced modeling features and logical division of large systems into small process components and their internal linkage are the key contributions of this work. The aim of this development is to apply the simulation technique in order to evaluate the overall project functionalities from the dynamic business perspective. A set of business objective functions (i.e., life cycle objective function [LCOF]) has been employed as a basis for decision making throughout the project's life. Object-oriented programming language with the object-oriented database technology facilitates the necessary model capability. A brief case study has been used to demonstrate and discuss the model capability. [source]


    Synthesis of a Model for Life-Cycle Project Management

    COMPUTER-AIDED CIVIL AND INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING, Issue 1 2000
    Ali Jaafari
    The focus of this article is on life-cycle objective,based project management models in general. The model has been designed (1) to facilitate employment of life-cycle objective,based project management approaches and (2) to support concurrent engineering and construction, thus promoting greater integration of total processes under which projects are proposed and implemented. In order to synthesize the functions designed in the model, we undertook a detailed case study of a large capital project. This case study has been documented in separate articles; only the results of the study will be presented in this article. While this field research shed light on the actual needs and requirements, the design of the functions was approached from first principles. They incorporate the basic shift from the traditional objectives of cost, time, and quality to life-cycle objective functions, such as return on investment, facility operability, and life-cycle integration. This article describes the fundamental philosophy and framework for the development of life-cycle project management in general and contrasts this with the traditional project management models. [source]


    DISCIPLINING THE PROFESSIONAL: THE CASE OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT*

    JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 6 2002
    DAMIAN HODGSON
    Despite its rapid growth in recent years, Project Management has received very little critical attention, particularly when compared to the more ,hyped' managerial fashions such as TQM (cf. Wilkinson and Willmott, 1995) and BPR (cf. Grey and Mitev, 1995; Grint, 1994). My intention in this paper is to critically examine the ongoing construction of Project Management as a professional discipline in modern organizations. Drawing on an understanding of ,discipline' based in Foucauldian work, I will briefly trace the historical construction of Project Management as a form of managerial knowledge, outlining the key models and techniques which make up contemporary Project Management. Through an empirical study of the articulation and reproduction of Project Management within two Financial Services institutions, the everyday construction of Project Management as an ,objective' and ,abstract' body of knowledge will be described. I then contrast this with the embodied and power-laden operation of Project Management, with disciplinary effects not only on those employees whose work is restructured in line with Project Management principles but equally upon self-professed Project Management professionals themselves. [source]


    Project success as a topic in project management journals

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 4 2009
    Lavagnon A. Ika
    Abstract This article highlights the characteristics of articles on project success published between 1986 and 2004 in the Project Management Journal (PMJ) and the International Journal of Project Management (IJPM). The analysis covers references, concepts like project management success, project success, success criteria, and success factors; features of the samples, data collection, and analysis techniques used; and professional disciplines. The results show that research on project success is characterized by diversity except in epistemological and methodological perspectives. The article suggests a shift to project, portfolio, and program success and concludes with a discussion on the traditional state of the research, criticizes its assumptions, and offers alternative metaphors and recommendations for future research. [source]


    Project management improvement efforts,creating project management value by uniqueness or mainstream thinking?

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 1 2009
    Erling S. Andersen
    Abstract This paper presents a research study that is part of the large international Project Management Institute (PMI),sponsored research project the "Value of Project Management." Three case studies have been conducted on Norwegian enterprises. This article focuses on how enterprises improve project management and presents the improvement efforts and the stated reasons behind them. There are striking similarities as to the prioritized ways the enterprises have chosen to make improvements: use of a rather standardized model for project work and internal schooling activities. The enterprises all explain their efforts as internally driven, even if some consultancy assistance was used. This article discusses three drivers behind the improvement efforts: an economic perspective, a new institutionalism perspective, and an innovation perspective. This article identifies indicators pointing to all drivers and helps us understand why and how enterprises are improving project management. The importance of research on the practice of the most capable enterprises within the project management field is acknowledged. [source]


    Reinventing Project Management: The Diamond Approach to Successful Growth and Innovation.

    R & D MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2008
    By Aaron J. Shenhar, Dov Dvir
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    eXtreme Project Management: Using Leadership, Principles, and Tools to Deliver Value in the Face of Reality

    THE JOURNAL OF PRODUCT INNOVATION MANAGEMENT, Issue 6 2005
    Gerald Mulenburg
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Global R&D Project Management and Organization: A Taxonomy

    THE JOURNAL OF PRODUCT INNOVATION MANAGEMENT, Issue 5 2000
    Vittorio Chiesa
    This work studies the management and organization of global R&D projects, i.e. projects leading to innovations to be exploited in multiple countries. It provides a taxonomy of how firms conduct such projects. The empirical base is composed of twelve multinational companies, from the three major areas (Europe, Japan, North America), operating technology-intensive businesses. Two basic structures are identified: the specialization based, where one foreign lab (the firm's center of excellence) is assigned the responsibility for developing a new product, process or technology on the basis of a global mandate, and the integration based, where different units contribute to technology development programs and global innovations are the result of the joint work of these units. In each categories two sub-cases have been found: the center of excellence and the supported specialization, on the one hand, and the network and specialized contributor structures, on the other. The four structures have been studied in relation to: the key characteristics of the organization and management of global projects (in each phase, from conception to introduction into the market), the organizational factors affecting the success, the context conditions in which the structure is considered appropriate. [source]


    Project management and high-value superyacht projects: An improvisational and temporal perspective

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 1 2010
    Steve Leybourne
    Abstract This article considers specific elements of the project management of high-value deliverables in an under-researched sector. Specifically, it looks at ways in which change is accommodated in complex projects where scope, delivery, and cost are relatively inflexible. An emerging literature considers improvisational working within project-based work, which dilutes the "plan, then execute" paradigm that has shaped project work for some time. This research contributes to the temporal and rhythmic aspects of work in this area, linking with extant theory on, among other areas, punctuated equilibrium and organizational "rhythm," and identifies parallels between improvised project work and established academic theory. [source]


    Project management in instructional design: ADDIE is not enough

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, Issue 5 2010
    Shahron Williams Van Rooij
    In the digital age, instructional designers must possess both a sound instructional design knowledge base and solid project management skills that will enable them to complete courseware projects on time, on budget and in conformance with client expectations. Project management skills include the ability to apply repeatable processes, along with interpersonal skills such as communication and leadership skills. However, courses in project management are often absent from the higher education instructional design curriculum, creating a gap between what is learned in instructional design programmes and real-world practice. In this paper, the author draws on the education and project management fields to examine this gap. The author argues that the gap between instructional design project management models and how instructional design practitioners view project management is a consequence of the divergent perspectives of higher education subcultures and the extent to which those subcultures are likely to embrace cross-disciplinary subjects such as project management. The author proposes some research and advocacy opportunities for closing the gap between instructional design education and practice. [source]


    Synthesis of a Model for Life-Cycle Project Management

    COMPUTER-AIDED CIVIL AND INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING, Issue 1 2000
    Ali Jaafari
    The focus of this article is on life-cycle objective,based project management models in general. The model has been designed (1) to facilitate employment of life-cycle objective,based project management approaches and (2) to support concurrent engineering and construction, thus promoting greater integration of total processes under which projects are proposed and implemented. In order to synthesize the functions designed in the model, we undertook a detailed case study of a large capital project. This case study has been documented in separate articles; only the results of the study will be presented in this article. While this field research shed light on the actual needs and requirements, the design of the functions was approached from first principles. They incorporate the basic shift from the traditional objectives of cost, time, and quality to life-cycle objective functions, such as return on investment, facility operability, and life-cycle integration. This article describes the fundamental philosophy and framework for the development of life-cycle project management in general and contrasts this with the traditional project management models. [source]


    E-GOVERNMENT SERVICE INNOVATION IN THE SCOTTISH CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEM

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2010
    Tony Kinder
    The paper features an original case study of integration of the Scottish criminal justice information systems, charting the ten-year history of the project. After briefing referencing international e-government experience, it critically assesses e-government in the UK, arguing that following an auspicious start laying infrastructure, e-government now focuses on cost-saving process improvements and is less successful at inter-organisational integration and citizen interactions, responding poorly to the challenges of interactive Internet (Web2) and service interoperability. Surveying literature on the use of project management techniques, it argues that popular e-government tools prescribe closed innovation when more open innovation frameworks (Chesbrough, 2006) may be appropriate to e-government. Two themes emerge: that the nature of e-government project management is closed rather than open and secondly, that e-government is often inadequately conceptualised in technical and organisational terms. [source]


    How Cadforce makes quality part of the bottom line for its distributed work teams

    GLOBAL BUSINESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, Issue 2 2009
    Cliff Moser
    When state-of-the-art technology and explicit work processes could not assure the quality of its deliverables, a drafting outsourcing firm turned to other tools to bridge critical learning and communication gaps between project teams on opposite sides of the world, as well as making the client part of the quality equation. Cadforce eliminated a layer of onshore project management and clarified accountabilities for quality; made training a core part of the project work flow; and synchronized onshore and offshore work cycles through a results-oriented work environment that incorporates new media, supplemented with a "human touch," to enhance collaboration and expedite communication between teams. Cadforce also involved clients in trade-off decisions by making the cost of quality an explicit part of its pricing strategy. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Revealing and Resolving Patient Safety Defects: The Impact of Leadership WalkRounds on Frontline Caregiver Assessments of Patient Safety

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 6 2008
    Allan Frankel
    Objective. To evaluate the impact of rigorous WalkRounds on frontline caregiver assessments of safety climate, and to clarify the steps and implementation of rigorous WalkRounds. Data Sources/Study Setting. Primary outcome variables were baseline and post WalkRounds safety climate scores from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Secondary outcomes were safety issues elicited through WalkRounds. Study period was August 2002 to April 2005; seven hospitals in Massachusetts agreed to participate; and the project was implemented in all patient care areas. Study Design. Prospective study of the impact of rigorously applied WalkRounds on frontline caregivers assessments of safety climate in their patient care area. WalkRounds were conducted weekly and according to the seven-step WalkRounds Guide. The SAQ was administered at baseline and approximately 18 months post-WalkRounds implementation to all caregivers in patient care areas. Results. Two of seven hospitals complied with the rigorous WalkRounds approach; hospital A was an academic teaching center and hospital B a community teaching hospital. Of 21 patient care areas, SAQ surveys were received from 62 percent of respondents at baseline and 60 percent post WalkRounds. At baseline, 10 of 21 care areas (48 percent) had safety climate scores below 60 percent, whereas post-WalkRounds three care areas (14 percent) had safety climate scores below 60 percent without improving by 10 points or more. Safety climate scale scores in hospital A were 62 percent at baseline and 77 percent post-WalkRounds (t=2.67, p=.03), and in hospital B were 46 percent at baseline and 56 percent post WalkRounds (t=2.06, p=.06). Main safety issues by category were equipment/facility (A [26 percent] and B [33 percent]) and communication (A [24 percent] and B [18 percent]). Conclusions. WalkRounds implementation requires significant organizational will; sustainability requires outstanding project management and leadership engagement. In the patient care areas that rigorously implemented WalkRounds, frontline caregiver assessments of patient safety increased. SAQ results such as safety climate scores facilitate the triage of quality improvement efforts, and provide consensus assessments of frontline caregivers that identify themes for improvement. [source]


    IT project managers' construction of successful project management practice: a repertory grid investigation

    INFORMATION SYSTEMS JOURNAL, Issue 3 2009
    Nannette P. Napier
    Abstract Although effective project management is critical to the success of information technology (IT) projects, little empirical research has investigated skill requirements for IT project managers (PMs). This study addressed this gap by asking 19 practicing IT PMs to describe the skills that successful IT PMs exhibit. A semi-structured interview method known as the repertory grid (RepGrid) technique was used to elicit these skills. Nine skill categories emerged: client management, communication, general management, leadership, personal integrity, planning and control, problem solving, systems development and team development. Our study complements existing research by providing a richer understanding of several skills that were narrowly defined (client management, planning and control, and problem solving) and by introducing two new skill categories that had not been previously discussed (personal integrity and team development). Analysis of the individual RepGrids revealed four distinct ways in which study participants combined skill categories to form archetypes of effective IT PMs. We describe these four IT PM archetypes , General Manager, Problem Solver, Client Representative and Balanced Manager , and discuss how this knowledge can be useful for practitioners, researchers and educators. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research. [source]


    Innovation management measurement: A review

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT REVIEWS, Issue 1 2006
    Richard Adams
    Measurement of the process of innovation is critical for both practitioners and academics, yet the literature is characterized by a diversity of approaches, prescriptions and practices that can be confusing and contradictory. Conceptualized as a process, innovation measurement lends itself to disaggregation into a series of separate studies. The consequence of this is the absence of a holistic framework covering the range of activities required to turn ideas into useful and marketable products. We attempt to address this gap by reviewing the literature pertaining to the measurement of innovation management at the level of the firm. Drawing on a wide body of literature, we first develop a synthesized framework of the innovation management process consisting of seven categories: inputs management, knowledge management, innovation strategy, organizational culture and structure, portfolio management, project management and commercialization. Second, we populate each category of the framework with factors empirically demonstrated to be significant in the innovation process, and illustrative measures to map the territory of innovation management measurement. The review makes two important contributions. First, it takes the difficult step of incorporating a vastly diverse literature into a single framework. Second, it provides a framework against which managers can evaluate their own innovation activity, explore the extent to which their organization is nominally innovative or whether or not innovation is embedded throughout their organization, and identify areas for improvement. [source]


    ISBT 128 implementation plan for cellular therapy products

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL APHERESIS, Issue 5 2007
    Paul Ashford
    Abstract The publication of new standards for terminology and labeling marks an important step in ensuring consistency and traceability of cellular therapies at the global level. However, it is only with the widespread implementation of the standard that the benefits can be truly realized. This paper provides guidance on the practical aspects of adopting these new standards for organizations with differing current levels of computerization. It discusses project management, equipment, licensing, and validation topics. J. Clin. Apheresis, 2007. © 2007 Internal Cellular Therapy Coding and Labeling Advisory Group. [source]


    The role of the hospitalist in quality improvement: Systems for improving the care of patients with acute coronary syndrome,

    JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE, Issue S4 2010
    Chad T. Whelan MD
    Abstract Quality improvement (QI) initiatives for systems of care are vital to deliver quality care for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and hospitalists are instrumental to the QI process. Core hospitalist competencies include the development of protocols and outcomes measures that support quality of care measures established for ACS. The hospitalist may lead, coordinate, or participate in a multidisciplinary team that designs, implements, and assesses an institutional system of care to address rapid identification of patients with ACS, medication safety, safe discharge, and meeting core measures that are quality benchmarks for ACS. The use of metrics and tools such as process flow mapping and run charts can identify quality gaps and show progress toward goals. These tools may be used to assess whether critical timeframes are met, such as the time to fibrinolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or whether patients receive guideline-recommended medications and counseling. At the institutional level, Project BOOST (Better Outcomes for Older Adults Through Safe Transitions) is an initiative designed to improve outcomes in elderly patients who are at higher risk for adverse events during the transition from inpatient to outpatient care. BOOST offers resources related to project management and data collection, and tools for patients and physicians. Collection and analysis of objective data are essential for documenting quality gaps or achievement of quality benchmarks. Through QI initiatives, the hospitalist has an opportunity to contribute to an institution's success beyond direct patient care, particularly as required for public disclosure of institutional performance and financial incentives promoted by regulatory agencies. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2010;5:S1,S7. © 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine. [source]


    Knowledge-oriented process portal with BPM approach to leverage NPD management

    KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 3 2009
    Henrique Rozenfeld
    New product development (NPD) processes can be improved through change projects managed in a context of business process management (BPM). In order to fully characterize and implement NPD process change projects it is necessary to be able to identify and adequately describe "to-be" processes. These "to-be" processes should be based on best practices, which can be structured into NPD reference models and body of knowledge (BOK). Despite the availability of NPD BOKs today, they are not easily applicable to process improvement, since they are published in on- and off-line guidelines that are unsuitable for dynamic updating by a collaborative network such as a community of practice (CoP). A proposal is therefore put forward for the collaborative systematization of best practices through a two-level portal external and internal to an organization, enabling users to participate in creating generic and public NPD reference models and BOKs. The proposal allows for the selection of a specific reference model and an existing BOK as required. This paper presents the main concepts underlying the proposal and its methodology, which focuses on agile project management (APM). It also describes the portal vision and the main deliverables of this research, with emphasis on the concept of the knowledge-oriented process (KOP) portal. Three prototypes based on this concept are shown, which represent the evolutionary development of the KOP portal. Finally, the main results of the application are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Technology museums: New publics, new partners

    MUSEUM INTERNATIONAL, Issue 4 2000
    GŁnter Knerr
    Museums in general, and science and technology museums in particular, must borrow and adapt the notions of customer service and the methods of project management, market analysis and fund-raising that have proved their effectiveness in business and industry, in the view of GŁnter Knerr, director of the Deutsches Museum in Munich. He is well-versed in new communication strategies, in particular, multimedia operations, and is head of the Department of Craft and Industry as well as the museum's Chemistry Project. [source]


    The partnership between project management and organizational change: Integrating change management with change leadership

    PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT, Issue 1 2007
    Barber Griffith-Cooper
    The nature of project management is change. Even though all knowledge areas in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) are rooted in controlling change, none of these areas specifically addresses the human elements of change. There is a significant distinction between directly controlling change relative to the nonhuman aspects of a project ( change control) and effecting change in the human dimensions of a project through leadership ( change leadership). This article characterizes the distinctive activities of change leadership and change control and their interrelationship throughout the project life cycle. Although distinct, change control and change leadership are interdependent and mutually supporting,both are needed to support project success. [source]


    Are we getting any better?

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 4 2010
    Comparing project management in the years 2000
    Abstract This paper presents a study on the progress of project management. Descriptions of projects from 2000 and 2008 are studied. The study concludes that the field of project management is moving ahead. Project team members are more knowledgeable about project work, project objectives are more clearly expressed, project organization is more appropriate, most work processes are improved, and team members experience project work as rewarding and are more motivated for future projects. However, the project results are not fully satisfactory. It is shown that stakeholders' satisfaction could be improved by better decision processes, better management and leadership, and closer cooperation with the stakeholders. [source]


    Blowing hot and cold on project management

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 3 2010
    Christophe N. Bredillet
    Abstract The purpose of this article is to suggest a possible "meta" approach of the project management field,the unit of analysis,respectful of the various perspectives in existence, while providing an integrative ontological and epistemological framework. In order to do so, I first suggest what could be perceived as being the state of the field and its main constituting "school of thoughts." Then I open the debate on what could be the ontological and epistemological perspectives enabling us to better take into account the diversity we face in considering the richness of the field. Based on these developments, I propose to address project management as a complex integrative knowledge field, which eventually will lead us to consider "modeling,developing specific convention,to do ingeniously" as acting and learning mode in the management of projects. [source]


    Polar expedition project and project management

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 3 2010
    Gilles Garel
    Abstract This article presents the results of a polar expedition by sea kayak in which the authors participated in 2007. It calls upon the approach of Bruno Latour to describe the forms of socio-technical combinations and the controversies that arose during the course of the project. In addition, the article utilizes the experience of this unique project to draw lessons regarding project management in general: lessons on team makeup, knowledge management, and the relationship between preparation and actual implementation of a given project. [source]


    Public-sector project management: Meeting the challenges and achieving results

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 3 2010
    Steve Waddell PMP Reviewer
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Beyond frontiers of traditional project management: An approach to evolutionary, self-organizational principles and the complexity theory,results of the research program

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 2 2010
    Manfred Saynisch
    Abstract This article speculates beyond current thinking in project management, asserting that traditional project management cannot fulfill the challenges and requirements for mastering increased complexity in society, economics, and technology. The new paradigmatic evolutionary-systemic and cybernetic-systemic research results (including self-organization or chaotic systems) in the more recent natural and social sciences were analyzed based on their relevance for a new perspective in project management. Selected results of the research program will be presented, including a short description of "Project Management Second Order (PM-2)" as a highlighted result and a new paradigm in project management. [source]


    Project management and high-value superyacht projects: An improvisational and temporal perspective

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 1 2010
    Steve Leybourne
    Abstract This article considers specific elements of the project management of high-value deliverables in an under-researched sector. Specifically, it looks at ways in which change is accommodated in complex projects where scope, delivery, and cost are relatively inflexible. An emerging literature considers improvisational working within project-based work, which dilutes the "plan, then execute" paradigm that has shaped project work for some time. This research contributes to the temporal and rhythmic aspects of work in this area, linking with extant theory on, among other areas, punctuated equilibrium and organizational "rhythm," and identifies parallels between improvised project work and established academic theory. [source]


    Information systems project management in PMJ: A brief history

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 4 2009
    Suzanne Rivard
    Abstract The Project Management Institute (PMI) plays an important role in the training, career development, and recognition of information systems (IS) project managers. Indeed, not only do IS professionals account for a large proportion of the PMI constituency, but PMI is also influential in the training of IS project managers. This study explores further the contribution of PMI to IS project management by means of its main publication outlet, the Project Management Journal (PMJ). To do so, the contents of the 39 IS project management articles published in PMJ during 1988,2005 were analyzed. The article focuses on the following dimensions: the relative importance of IS project management articles published by PMJ; the profile of the authors of IS project management articles in PMJ; the main issues, in terms of IS project management, covered by PMJ; and the major gaps, in terms of IS project management, in the coverage of this domain by PMJ. [source]


    Value creation by building an intraorganizational common frame of reference concerning project management

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 3 2009
    Pernille Eskerod
    Abstract In this article, we suggest that organizations should not focus on selecting between various project management approaches, tools, or behaviors. Instead, we claim that the real benefit from project management implementations comes from the mere creation of a common frame of reference. Based on four case studies, we identify elements that enhance such a common frame of reference: (1) a common project management model, (2) common project management training, (3) common project management examinations/certifications, and (4) activities for knowledge sharing. Values created, especially when the application of the elements was mandatory, were better communication, better customer satisfaction, and easier knowledge sharing. [source]