Productivity Effects (productivity + effects)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


,BAUMOL'S DISEASE', PRODUCTION EXTERNALITIES AND PRODUCTIVITY EFFECTS OF INTERSECTORAL TRANSFERS

METROECONOMICA, Issue 3 2007
Claudio De Vincenti
ABSTRACT This paper presents a model that introduces in an unbalanced growth framework à la Baumol the hypothesis of an endogenous productivity growth due to a positive externality of the service sector on manufacturing productivity and a learning-by-doing process inside both sectors. The model shows that a policy aimed at keeping the ratio between outputs in the two sectors constant in real terms may improve the aggregate productivity performance of the economy, depending on the parameters' values. Then the model derives the dynamics of the intersectoral transfer which is necessary to keep the ratio between outputs constant, and verifies that the amount of the transfer turns out to be always lower than the output of the manufacturing sector, and only asymptotically approaches it. [source]


MODELLING PRODUCTIVITY EFFECTS OF TRADE OPENNESS: A DUAL APPROACH,

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC PAPERS, Issue 2 2009
SATYA PAUL
A cost function framework is used to model the productivity effect of trade openness in terms of cost saving. The idea of ,cost saving' is closer to the entrepreneur's view of productivity. An entrepreneur would expect a reduction in the cost of production if trade openness brings any benefits to their firm. The output-enhancing (primal) productivity effect of openness is obtainable from the cost-saving (dual) productivity effect through the cost-output link. The cost-function framework also enables us to investigate whether trade openness induces firms to adopt a technology that is biased towards the use or saving of any factor of production. An empirical exercise based on time series data for the Australian two-digit manufacturing industries reveals significant cost-saving and output-enhancing productivity effects of trade openness. Trade openness is biased towards the saving of labour and the use of capital. These results are quite insensitive to the choice of alternative measures of openness. [source]


The Impact of Training Intensity on Establishment Productivity

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 1 2006
Article first published online: 23 DEC 200, THOMAS ZWICK
The empirical literature on productivity effects of continuing training is constantly increasing. However, the results on this subject differ widely. Explanations for this worrying diversity seem to lie in differences between countries, labor market institutions, and data generation on one hand, and in differences between the underlying estimation techniques on the other (Bartel, 2000). This paper concentrates on the latter problem and shows how results vary with different estimation techniques. [source]


INTERREGIONAL KNOWLEDGE SPILLOVERS AND OCCUPATIONAL CHOICE IN A MODEL OF FREE TRADE AND ENDOGENOUS GROWTH,

JOURNAL OF REGIONAL SCIENCE, Issue 5 2009
Colin R. Davis
ABSTRACT A two region model of horizontal innovation with free trade and occupational choice is used to examine the spatial patterns of innovation and manufacturing industry in interior and core-periphery long-run equilibria. The inclusion of skill heterogeneity among workers creates a tension between stabilizing productivity effects that coincide with reallocations of workers across industries, and destabilizing productivity effects that arise with localized stocks of knowledge capital. We find that while core-periphery equilibria are always saddlepath stable, interior equilibria are saddlepath stable when knowledge spillovers exceed a threshold level but are unstable otherwise. In addition, incorporating skill heterogeneity into the model allows for interior equilibria with asymmetric shares for innovation and industry. [source]


MODELLING PRODUCTIVITY EFFECTS OF TRADE OPENNESS: A DUAL APPROACH,

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC PAPERS, Issue 2 2009
SATYA PAUL
A cost function framework is used to model the productivity effect of trade openness in terms of cost saving. The idea of ,cost saving' is closer to the entrepreneur's view of productivity. An entrepreneur would expect a reduction in the cost of production if trade openness brings any benefits to their firm. The output-enhancing (primal) productivity effect of openness is obtainable from the cost-saving (dual) productivity effect through the cost-output link. The cost-function framework also enables us to investigate whether trade openness induces firms to adopt a technology that is biased towards the use or saving of any factor of production. An empirical exercise based on time series data for the Australian two-digit manufacturing industries reveals significant cost-saving and output-enhancing productivity effects of trade openness. Trade openness is biased towards the saving of labour and the use of capital. These results are quite insensitive to the choice of alternative measures of openness. [source]


Trade liberalization and productivity dynamics: evidence from Canada

CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2008
Alla Lileeva
Abstract., The paper investigates the productivity effects of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement on Canadian manufacturing. It finds that Canadian tariff cuts increased exit rates among moderately productive non-exporting plants. This led to the reallocation of market share towards highly productive plants, which explains the aggregate productivity gains observed when Canadian tariffs were reduced. The U.S. tariff cuts led to the within-plant productivity gains in exporters and, especially, new entrants into the export market. Any lack of output responses and labour-shedding as a consequence of the FTA was experienced by non-exporting plants, while exporters captured the gains from the FTA. Ce mémoire enquête sur les effets de productivité de l'Accord de libre échange Canada-USA dans le secteur manufacturier canadien. Il appert que les réductions de tarifs douaniers canadiens ont accru les taux d'évacuation des installations modérément productives qui n'exportaient pas. Voilà qui a entraîné une réallocation des parts de marché vers les installations hautement productives, ce qui explique les gains de productivité observés quand les tarifs douaniers ont été réduits. Les réductions de tarifs américains ont entraîné des gains de productivité intra-installations dans les entreprises exportatrices, et ce particulièrement pour les entreprises nouvellement entrées dans le marché des exportations. Tout manque à s'ajuster à l'Accord par une recalibration de la production et par une réduction de la main d'oeuvre s'est concentré dans les installations qui n'exportaient pas, alors que les entreprises exportatrices ont capturé les gains de l'Accord. [source]