Prison

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Law and Criminology

Terms modified by Prison

  • prison population
  • prison sentence
  • prison staff
  • prison system
  • prison term

  • Selected Abstracts


    SERVING FATHERS WHO LEAVE PRISON

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2003
    Jessica Pearson
    This article describes characteristics, service experiences, and outcomes for 350 ex-offenders with minor-aged children who were served at the John Inman Work and Family Center (WFC), a multiservice program offering assistance with employment, child support, and family reconnection. Following their visit to the WFC, fathers had higher rates of employment and child support payment. They also returned to prison at lower rates than the general offender population. Although the findings suggest that parents who leave prison benefit from a collaborative facility that offers multiple services, more rigorous research over longer periods of time is needed to reliably assess the effectiveness of reentry programs. [source]


    BOOT CAMP PRISONS AND CORRECTIONS POLICY: MOVING FROM MILITARISM TO AN ETHIC OF CARE

    CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 2 2006
    FAITH E. LUTZE
    First page of article [source]


    UNIVERSAL HEPATITIS B VIRUS VACCINATION IN FRENCH PRISONS: BREAKING DOWN THE LAST BARRIERS

    ADDICTION, Issue 7 2010
    M. PATRIZIA CARRIERI
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    [Commentary] DATABASE LINKAGE: OUTSIDE REFLECTIONS ON HEALTH CARE INSIDE PRISONS

    ADDICTION, Issue 7 2009
    SHEILA M. BIRD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Exploring the possibility of risk assessment of Japanese sexual offenders using Static-99

    CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 3 2006
    Junya Sudo
    Background,The number of sexual offences reported in Japan doubled between 1992 and 2002. This has prompted attention to assessment of risk of recidivism. Aims,To explore whether an actuarial assessment of risk widely used in the West can be meaningfully applied to Japanese men serving a prison sentence for sexual offences. Method,All sex offenders incarcerated in Kitakyushu Medical Prison in Fukuoka at any time in a period of one year (1 July 2002-30 June 2003) were identified. Demographic data, characteristics of offences and the Static-99 were rated from records. Results,Following a slightly modified application of coding rules, all items of the Static-99 were rateable. Nine offenders of 45 whose Static-99 score was over 6 were thus identified as high-risk offenders. The items distinguishing apparently high-risk men were history of institutionalization as a delinquent and mental retardation. Conclusions and implications for practice,The Static-99 may be a useful tool in assessing sex offenders in Japan. With apparently increasing recognition of sex crimes here, it seems timely to be developing a systematic approach to assessment. Further work is required to test its value in practice as a predictor of recidivism. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Users' views of prison health services: a qualitative study

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 3 2007
    Louise Condon
    Abstract Title. Users' views of prison health services: a qualitative study. Aim., This paper is a report of a study of the views of prisoners about health services provided in prisons. Background., Prison provides an opportunity for a ,hard to reach' group to access health services, primarily those provided by nurses. Prisoners typically have high health and social needs, but the views and experiences of prisoners about health services in prison have not been widely researched. Method., Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 111 prisoners in purposively selected 12 prisons in England in 2005. Interviews covered both prisoners' views of health services and their own ways of caring for their health in prison. Interviews were analysed to develop a conceptual framework and identify dominant themes. Findings., Prisoners considered health services part of a personal prison journey, which began at imprisonment and ended on release. For those who did not access health services outside prison, imprisonment improved access to both mental and physical health services. Prisoners identified accessing services, including those provided by nurses, confidentiality, being seen as a ,legitimate' patient and living with a chronic condition as problems within the prison healthcare system. At all points along the prison healthcare journey, the prison regime could conflict with optimal health care. Conclusion., Lack of autonomy is a major obstacle to ensuring that prisoners' health needs are fully met. Their views should be considered when planning, organizing and delivering prison health services. Further research is needed to examine how nurses can ensure a smooth journey through health care for prisoners. [source]


    Women, serious mental illness and recidivism: A gender-based analysis of recidivism risk for women with SMI released from prison

    JOURNAL OF FORENSIC NURSING, Issue 1 2010
    Kristin G. Cloyes PhD
    Abstract Two groups now constitute the fastest growing segment of the U.S. prison population: women and persons with mental illness. Few large-scale studies have explored associations among serious mental illness (SMI), gender, and recidivism, or compared factors such as illness severity and clinical history as these construct notably different situations for incarcerated women and men. We report on our recent study comparing prison recidivism rates, severity of mental illness, and clinical history for women and men released from Utah State Prison 1998,2002. Implications: While women generally have better recidivism outcomes than men, we find that SMI related factors have a greater negative effect on the trajectories of women in this sample as compared with the men. This suggests that programs and policies focused on the SMI-specific risks and needs of women could significantly reduce prison recidivism and increase community tenure for this group, with far-reaching effects for families and communities. [source]


    Granting the Suffrage to Felons in Prison

    JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY, Issue 2 2003
    Saul Brenner
    First page of article [source]


    Halting African American Boys' Progression From Pre-K to Prison: What Families, Schools, and Communities Can Do!

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 1 2010
    Oscar A. Barbarin
    First page of article [source]


    Narcissism: fragile bodies in a fragile world.

    PSYCHOTHERAPY AND POLITICS INTERNATIONAL, Issue 3 2008
    Part
    Abstract In this two-part paper, we explore how, in Western society, intensified consumer culture, playing on feelings of shame and inadequacy, can be seen as reactivating the ,narcissistic wound' while the recent growth of information technology increasingly provides access to a global spectacle and a virtual world that offer an escape from reality, fuelling the illusion of immortality and invulnerability to physical/emotional needs. We ask who benefits from this culture of unrelatedness and disembodiment and what are the repercussions in terms of participation in social life and organized response to global issues. Using material from our practices and from social life, we seek to identify the collective cost of maintaining a disassociation that can permeate not only the therapeutic process but also work, personal relationships and events on the political stage. We consider a view of Bush as a narcissistic president in a narcissistic culture with the Iraq war as a narcissistic misadventure, and we present vignettes from the consulting room, Dance Movement Therapy work in Holloway Prison, and the academic world of prehistoric archaeology to show how narcissistic behaviours are embedded in many diverse situations in Western society. We ask how the concept of narcissism in our media age can help us understand phenomena such as the rise of fundamentalism; celebrity cult; insatiable aspirations to ,self-improvement'; obsession with ,success' and consumer goodies; the denial of ageing; the upsurge in cosmetic surgery, body modification and self-harm; as well as growing addiction to alcohol and hard drugs. Finally we ask, how do the narcissistic fantasy of self-sufficiency, the disavowal of loss and the denial of the ultimate non-discursive reality of death affect our ability to respond appropriately to human injustice and the fragility of our planet? Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Prison: Cultural Memory and Dark Tourism by J.Z. Wilson

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 3 2009
    MATTHEW LONG
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Dining in: The Symbolic Power of Food in Prison

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 3 2006
    REBECCA GODDERIS
    Consumption is a constantly recurring aspect of institutional life and, therefore, by examining this ubiquitous act, a researcher can access a subtle, nuanced account of how power operates within the prison apparatus. By drawing on examples from interviews with prisoners about the prison food experience, this article will work to make visible the centrality of prisoner resistance to these power dynamics. In addition, this examination of prison food will support current analyses in the criminological literature by developing an increased understanding of the prisoner as both agent and subject, while highlighting the moral dimensions of penal practice. [source]


    Privatisation and Innovation , Rhetoric and Reality: The Development of a Therapeutic Community Prison

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 2 2003
    Elaine Genders
    Privatisation is here to stay, albeit under the rhetorical guise of public-private partnership. All new prisons are now provided by means of competition. The recent issuing to potential contractors of the invitation to tender, and award of contract to Premier Prisons, for the DCMF (design, construction, management and finance) of the first purpose built therapeutic community prison HMP Dovegate (opened in November 2001) illustrates well some of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in the private as opposed to public mode of provision of innovative regimes. [source]


    Experiences of Younger Siblings of Young Men in Prison

    CHILDREN & SOCIETY, Issue 4 2008
    Rosie Meek
    Whilst the detrimental effects of forced separation through incarceration have been explored in the context of parent,child relationships, little is known about the social and psychological impact of having a sibling in custody. The present research was carried out in order to develop a better understanding of the needs and experiences of children who have a sibling in prison and is based on an interpretative phenomenological analysis of the accounts of eight young people (age 9,17, mean = 13 years) with an older brother in custody. The interviews revealed a series of themes, including the emotional response to a sibling being taken into custody, a reluctance to disclose information to teachers and peers, and perceptions of own behaviour in the light of the sibling's experiences of the criminal justice system. Findings are discussed in relation to policy implications and recommendations for those working with young people, and suggestions are made for future research directions. [source]


    Globalization and Prison Privatization: Why Are Most of the World's For-Profit Adult Prisons to Be Found in the American South?

    INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY, Issue 3 2007
    Phillip J. Wood
    For a generation, students of comparative public policy and international politics have argued that global market discipline and the increasing mobility of international "best practices" have given rise to policy convergence at the global level. This paper uses the American case to investigate some of the forces thought to have given rise to the spread of private prisons. It finds that while there are prisons in a number of countries, the evidence of convergence is thin and seems to suggest that the core of the prison privatization is in the American South. It then examines several theories,the political economy of the prison boom and overcrowding, globalization theory, the politics of the new right and the idea of a "prison-industrial complex",that have been used to explain prison privatization and the extent to which they are consistent with the empirical pattern. Each takes us some way to understanding that pattern, but none can provide a clear theoretical mapping. [source]


    Prisons and the tuberculosis epidemic in Russia

    JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT, Issue 5 2003
    A. J. Mercer
    A resurgence of tuberculosis (TB) occurred in Russia in the 1990s, in a period of general health crisis following the break-up of the Soviet Union. Inter-related increases in poverty, unemployment and unhealthy lifestyle probably contributed to increased incidence and mortality from TB among the civilian population. The number of prisoners increased dramatically in the 1990s and many come from socially marginalized groups at high risk of TB. There is a high prevalence of TB in prisons in Russia, with inadequate TB control measures, overcrowding and poor nutrition contributing to the problem. Many prisoners are released before completion of treatment, often into a social milieu that fosters transmission of TB. Prisoners and ex-prisoners account for a very high proportion of TB cases in Russia and without adequate treatment for them the epidemic is unlikely to be brought under control. 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Downsizing Prisons: How to Reduce Crime and End Mass Incarceration.

    LAW & SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 3 2006
    By Michael Jacobson
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The Emergence Of Multi-Inspectorate Inspections: 'Going It Alone Is Not An Option'

    PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, Issue 4 2000
    Enid Mordaunt
    Drawing on data from HM Inspectorate of Prisons, HM Inspectorate of Probation, the Office for Standards in Education and the Social Services Inspectorate, this paper develops a typology of inspection, classified according to the focus of inspection. Five basic inspection types emerge, namely single institutional, multi-service, the-matic, survey and monitoring review. The typology is further categorized by a range of characteristics, resulting in a series of variants. The paper then focuses on the particular characteristic of the multi-inspectorate approach to inspection, because this is seen to offer a significant development in inspection practice that is set to expand and develop in the future. By examining operational examples of this approach it becomes clear that inspectorates are affecting the working practices of one another as they use the multi-inspectorate approach as an exercise in bench-marking. [source]


    Death for a Terrorist: Media Coverage of the McVeigh Execution as a Case Study in Interorganizational Partnering between the Public and Private Sectors

    PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW, Issue 5 2003
    Linda Wines Smith
    In June 2001, the Federal Bureau of Prisons helped to carry out the execution of Timothy McVeigh for his role in the infamous 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The intense national and international media attention that the execution received was virtually unprecedented in the bureau's history, and it put the bureau in the difficult position of having to carry out two potentially conflicting responsibilities: facilitating coverage of the execution by hundreds of reporters, producers, and technicians, while maintaining the safety and security of the maximum security penitentiary in which the execution was held. Historically, the Bureau of Prisons has preferred to maintain a low media profile and had no experience managing a large-scale media event. This article examines how the bureau met this challenge by forming a partnership with the news media through the creation of a Media Advisory Group. It analyzes the goals, functions, and achievements of the Media Advisory Group by employing the Dawes model of interorganizational relationships. [source]


    Understanding Prisons: Key Issues in Policy and Practice , By A. Coyle

    THE BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, Issue 3 2007
    Barbara Mason
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Does Overcrowding in Prisons Exacerbate the Risk of Suicide among Women Prisoners?

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 2 2010
    LAUREN SHARKEY
    Abstract: This article reveals the main contributory factors to suicide among female prisoners and shows that overcrowding is a factor exacerbating the risk of suicide. In-depth interviews were conducted with ten female prisoners in one closed prison in 2007. They focused on incidents of self-harm and attempted suicide revealing the negative impact of the prison experience and, in particular, the effect of overcrowding. There are few studies looking at the link between overcrowding and suicide. This study highlights the need to explore this link especially at a time when overcrowding and suicide in prisons are high. [source]


    ,Cavemen in an Era of Speed-of-Light Technology': Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Communication within Prisons

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 2 2009
    YVONNE JEWKES
    Abstract: Many prisoners believe that the restricted access they have to computer-mediated communication (CMC) technologies and, in particular, the almost total absence of computers and Internet access in prisons is a form of censure that renders them second-class citizens in the Information Age. This article examines contemporary rationales and historical precedents for denying prisoners the means to communicate (both with each other and with those outside the prison) and argues that the prevention of communication, a pivotal feature of the Victorian and Edwardian prison regime, represents a significant continuity in the experience of prison life in the 21st Century. [source]


    Humane Prisons by D. Jones (Ed.)

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 2 2008
    GUY SHEFER
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Privatisation and Innovation , Rhetoric and Reality: The Development of a Therapeutic Community Prison

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 2 2003
    Elaine Genders
    Privatisation is here to stay, albeit under the rhetorical guise of public-private partnership. All new prisons are now provided by means of competition. The recent issuing to potential contractors of the invitation to tender, and award of contract to Premier Prisons, for the DCMF (design, construction, management and finance) of the first purpose built therapeutic community prison HMP Dovegate (opened in November 2001) illustrates well some of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in the private as opposed to public mode of provision of innovative regimes. [source]


    Incidence and Characteristics of Rroma Men in Romanian Prisons

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 3 2002
    Ioan Durnescu
    This article reports on findings from the first stage of a longer study of the realities of offending in Romania, which has the highest incarceration rate in Europe. The main goals of the research were to make an accurate estimate of the number of Rroma (Gypsy) men in Romanian prisons and to identify their socio-cultural characteristics and criminality. The information from this study will be used to help facilitate the work of the developing probation service in Romania and the social integration of Rroma offenders. It should also inform a crime reduction strategy in Romania and hopefully, the social inclusion policies of the European Commission, Romania and its accession neighbours all having large Rroma communities. [source]


    Drug Misuse in Prisons: Some Comments on the Prison Service Drug Strategy

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 4 2001
    Anthea Hucklesby
    This article draws on the findings of a research study conducted on behalf of the Directorate of Health Care of the Prison Service. The study involved conducting a needs analysis of drug misuse in three Leicestershire prisons. The aims of the project were: (i) to assess the level of drug misuse in three prison establishments; (ii) to assess the level of staff knowledge of drug misuse and staff management of drug misuse; (iii) to assess current staff training in drug misuse, and (iv) to explain how effective multi-disciplinary working with prison staff and staff in community based facilities may be developed. The article presents some of the findings from the research which show how they have informed the current drug strategy while at the same time crucial findings and important issues have been sidelined. We will be arguing that the 1998 strategy is a small improvement on the previous policy but the continued emphasis on the supply side approach to tackling drug misuse will ultimately fail to reduce drug misuse in prison. Not only do we wish to question the approach which the strategy adopts but also whether or not the extent of the problem requires the level of response envisaged and the resources involved. [source]


    Not Just ,Visitors' to Prisons:The Experiences of Imams who Work Inside the Penal System

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 1 2001
    Basia Spalek
    This article presents the results of a study exploring the consequences of working within a Christian-dominated penal system upon a group of Imams who regularly visit prisons. The Islamic religion is currently the fastest growing non-Christian religion in British prisons and so it was considered to be important to document the experiences of the spiritual guides of this faith. Interview data revealed that the Imams face many disadvantages as a result of belonging to a non-Christian religion, amounting to a form of ,institutional racism'. However, many of them revealed that they were not the passive victims of institutional racism (and sometimes direct racism also), but rather struggled against their material conditions in order to force the prisons in which they work to respond to their own needs and those of the prisoners whom they serve. Nonetheless, it appears that any opportunities for change are limited by the structural imbalance between Christian and non-Christian faiths within the penal system. [source]


    Governing Prisons: An Analysis of Who is Governing Prisons and the Competencies Which They Require to Govern Effectively

    THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 1 2000
    Shane Bryans
    Prison Governors have received little attention from researchers. This article begins to correct that balance by exploring the characteristics of prison Governors as a group and by identifying the competencies which Governors require to govern effectively. The response to a questionnaire sent to all Governors reveals that the typical Governor is a white male, aged 50, who has been a Governor for the last six years of his 24 years Prison Service career and joined the Prison Service as a second career without a degree. The article goes on to argue that, to be effective, Governors need to be competent in four areas: general management, incident management, public sector management and prison management. In addition, they must demonstrate certain behaviours which are identified in the Prison Service Core Competency Framework. [source]


    Evaluation of the condom Distribution Program in New South Wales Prisons, Australia

    THE JOURNAL OF LAW, MEDICINE & ETHICS, Issue 1 2004
    Kate Dolan
    First page of article [source]


    Right to Be Hostile: Schools, Prisons, and the Making of Public Enemies , By Erica R. Meiners

    ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2010
    Damien M. Schnyder
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]