Powerful New Tool (powerful + new_tool)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Texas Children's Hospital makes leadership development a core business strategy

GLOBAL BUSINESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, Issue 3 2007
Linda Aldred
Even an admirable culture can have its dark side, and convincing current leaders that leadership is the problem is a task best not taken lightly. Texas Children's Hospital rose to the challenge with creative ways for building an enduring commitment to change, and for infusing leadership development into leaders' psyches and practices. Guiding principles and success profiles now link mission and values with the day-to-day expectations for employees, and are fully integrated into measurement, performance management, and selection systems. Powerful new tools and resources are helping build leadership competencies at all levels. Lower turnover and greater employee satisfaction are just the first indicators of the success of the initiative. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Digital PCR: a powerful new tool for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis?

PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS, Issue 12 2008
Bernhard G. Zimmermann
Abstract Recent reports have indicated that digital PCR may be useful for the noninvasive detection of fetal aneuploidies by the analysis of cell-free DNA and RNA in maternal plasma or serum. In this review we provide an insight into the underlying technology and its previous application in the determination of the allelic frequencies of oncogenic alterations in cancer specimens. We also provide an indication of how this new technology may prove useful for the detection of fetal aneuploidies and single gene Mendelian disorders. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


INVESTIGATION OF THE CONTENT OF ANCIENT TIBETAN METALLIC BUDDHA STATUES BY MEANS OF NEUTRON IMAGING METHODS

ARCHAEOMETRY, Issue 3 2010
E. H. LEHMANN
Many important cultural and religious objects from Asia consist of outer metallic shapes, usually bronze, which fully enclose inner contents made of organic materials such as wood, bark, paper, textile, plants and others. Bronze and other metallic materials, such as copper and silver, are generally more transparent to neutrons than to X-rays. However, organic materials are less transparent to neutrons than to X-rays and therefore organic materials, enclosed by metallic materials, can be made visible with neutrons. Therefore, neutron imaging (radiography and tomography) was found to be an ideal tool for the inspection of objects that consist of metal outside and organic materials inside. This has been successfully demonstrated here with four metallic Tibetan Buddha statues, providing archaeometry with a powerful new tool. The first successful applications of this novel technique are described in this article. Further possible and useful applications of neutron imaging of cultural objects are outlined. [source]


Increasing the mass accuracy of high-resolution LC-MS data using background ions , a case study on the LTQ-Orbitrap

PROTEINS: STRUCTURE, FUNCTION AND BIOINFORMATICS, Issue 22 2008
Richard A. Scheltema
Abstract With the advent of a new generation of high-resolution mass spectrometers, the fields of proteomics and metabolomics have gained powerful new tools. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel computational method that improves the mass accuracy of the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer from an initial 1,2,ppm, obtained by the standard software, to an absolute median of 0.21,ppm (SD 0.21,ppm). With the increased mass accuracy it becomes much easier to match mass chromatograms in replicates and different sample types, even if compounds are detected at very low intensities. The proposed method exploits the ubiquitous presence of background ions in LC-MS profiles for accurate alignment and internal mass calibration, making it applicable for all types of MS equipment. The accuracy of this approach will facilitate many downstream systems biology applications, including mass-based molecule identification, ab initio metabolic network reconstruction, and untargeted metabolomics in general. [source]


Voltage-gated proton channels: what's next?

THE JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY, Issue 22 2008
Thomas E. DeCoursey
This review is an attempt to identify and place in context some of the many questions about voltage-gated proton channels that remain unsolved. As the gene was identified only 2 years ago, the situation is very different than in fields where the gene has been known for decades. For the proton channel, most of the obvious and less obvious structure,function questions are still wide open. Remarkably, the proton channel protein strongly resembles the voltage-sensing domain of many voltage-gated ion channels, and thus offers a novel approach to study gating mechanisms. Another surprise is that the proton channel appears to function as a dimer, with two separate conduction pathways. A number of significant biological questions remain in dispute, unanswered, or in some cases, not yet asked. This latter deficit is ascribable to the intrinsic difficulty in evaluating the importance of one component in a complex system, and in addition, to the lack, until recently, of a means of performing an unambiguous lesion experiment, that is, of selectively eliminating the molecule in question. We still lack a potent, selective pharmacological inhibitor, but the identification of the gene has allowed the development of powerful new tools including proton channel antibodies, siRNA and knockout mice. [source]