Postpartum Care (postpartum + care)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Does Team Midwife Care Increase Satisfaction with Antenatal, Intrapartum, and Postpartum Care?

BIRTH, Issue 3 2000
A Randomized Controlled Trial
Background:Although policymakers have suggested that improving continuity of midwifery can increase women's satisfaction with care in childbirth, evidence based on randomized controlled trials is lacking. New models of care, such as birth centers and team midwife care, try to increase the continuity of care and caregiver. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new team midwife care program in the standard clinic and hospital environment on satisfaction with antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care in low-risk women in early pregnancy.Methods:Women at Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, were randomly allocated to team midwife care (n = 495) or standard care (n = 505) at booking in early pregnancy. Doctors attended most women in standard care, and continuity of the caregiver was lacking. Satisfaction was measured by means of a postal questionnaire 2 months after the birth.Results:Team midwife care was associated with increased satisfaction, and the differences between the groups were most noticeable for antenatal care, less noticeable for intrapartum care, and least noticeable for postpartum care. The study found no differences between team midwife care and standard care in medical interventions or in women's emotional well-being 2 months after the birth.Conclusion:Conclusions about which components of team midwife care were most important to increased satisfaction with antenatal care were difficult to draw, but data suggest that satisfaction with intrapartum care was related to continuity of the caregiver. [source]


Health Promotion and Risk Reduction in Malawi, Africa, Village Women

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC, GYNECOLOGIC & NEONATAL NURSING, Issue 2 2001
FAAN, Susan Gennaro RN
Objective: A train-the-trainer intervention was evaluated in which village leaders in Malawi, Africa, taught other villagers how to improve their health. Design: Health knowledge and reported health practices were compared before and after the educational intervention in 15 villages in Chimutu, Malawi, Africa. Setting: Surveys were completed by trained data gatherers in the village setting. Patients/Participants: All men and women of childbearing age who were present in the village when data collection occurred were asked to participate. There were 187 participants in the preintervention survey and 175 participants in the postintervention survey. Intervention: Seveniy-six village women were trained, using low literacy techniques, to provide content on health promotion and risk reduction in pregnancy. Over 20,000 persons have received at least one health teaching session from the village trainers. Results: The intervention resulted in reported changes in prenatal and postpartum care and in more births occurring in the hospital or clinic. Some positive nutritional changes were reported, although few changes in beliefs about use of herbal medicines or about the use of witchcraft were reported. Conclusions: A train-the-trainer approach is a sustainable intervention that appears to have positive benefits on the health of village women living in Malawi, Africa. [source]


Identifying predictors of breastfeeding self-efficacy in the immediate postpartum period,

RESEARCH IN NURSING & HEALTH, Issue 4 2006
Cindy-Lee E. Dennis
Abstract Researchers have found evidence that breastfeeding self-efficacy is an important variable that significantly influences initiation and duration rates. The purpose of this study was to develop a multi-factorial predictive model of breastfeeding self-efficacy in the first week postpartum. As part of a longitudinal study, a population-based sample of 522 breastfeeding mothers in a health region near Vancouver, British Columbia completed mailed questionnaires at 1-week postpartum. Bivariate correlations were used to select variables for the multiple regression analysis. The best-fit regression model revealed eight variables that explained 54% of the variance in Breastfeeding Self Efficacy Scale (BSES) scores at 1-week postpartum: maternal education, support from other women with children, type of delivery, satisfaction with labor pain relief, satisfaction with postpartum care, perceptions of breastfeeding progress, infant feeding method as planned, and maternal anxiety. The BSES may be used to identify risk factors, enabling health professionals to improve quality of care for new breastfeeding mothers. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 29: 256,268, 2006 [source]


Postpartum Positioning and Attachment Education for Increasing Breastfeeding: A Randomized Trial

BIRTH, Issue 4 2001
Ann Henderson RM, MEd Studies
Background:Although lactation experts suggest that a correct positioning and attachment technique reduces breastfeeding problems and enhances long-term breastfeeding, evidence from randomized trials is lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of postpartum positioning and attachment education on breastfeeding outcomes in first-time mothers.Method:A randomized trial was performed in a public hospital in Adelaide, South Australia, where 160 first-time mothers were randomly allocated to receive either structured one-to-one education (experimental group) or usual postpartum care (control group) within 24 hours of birth. The primary outcome was breastfeeding at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months postpartum; other outcomes were nipple pain and trauma in hospital and at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months, and satisfaction with breastfeeding.Results: No significantdifferences occurred in breastfeeding rates between the groups at each endpoint, although a trend in the direction of lower rates was seen at each endpoint in the experimental group. This group reported less nipple pain on days 2 (p= 0.004) and 3 (p= 0.04), but this was not sustained on follow-up. No differences were observed in nipple trauma in hospital or in self-reported nipple pain and/or trauma at the three endpoints. Experimental group women were less satisfied with breastfeeding at 3 and 6 months postpartum when using a one-item measure; however, a multiple-item measure showed no significant differences at the three endpoints. Conclusions: The intervention did not increase breastfeeding duration at any assessment time or demonstrate any differences between the groups on secondary outcomes. The trend toward lower breastfeeding rates in the experimental group suggests a need for a larger trial to evaluate whether or nor postpartum positioning and attachment education may negatively affect breastfeeding. [source]


Single Room Maternity Care and Client Satisfaction

BIRTH, Issue 4 2000
Patricia A Janssen MPH
Background:Single room maternity care is the provision of intrapartum and postpartum care in a single room. It promotes a philosophy of family centered care in which one nurse cares for the family consistently throughout the intrapartum and postpartum periods. At B.C. Women's Hospital, a tertiary level obstetric teaching hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, a seven-bed, single room maternity care unit was developed and opened as a demonstration project. As part of the evaluation of this unit, client satisfaction was compared between women enrolled in single room maternity care and those in a traditional setting.Method:The study group included 205 women who were admitted to the single room maternity care unit after meeting the low-risk criteria. Their responses on a satisfaction survey were compared with those of a historical comparison group of 221 women meeting the same eligibility criteria who were identified through chart audits 3 months before the single room maternity care unit was opened. A second, concurrent comparison group comprised 104 women who also met eligibility criteria.Results:Study group women were more satisfied than comparison groups in all areas evaluated, including provision of information and support, physical environment, nursing care, patient education, assistance with infant feeding, respect for privacy, and preparation for discharge.Conclusions:Single room maternity care was associated with a significant improvement in client satisfaction because of many factors, including the physical setting itself, avoidance of transfers, and improved continuity of nursing care. [source]


Does Team Midwife Care Increase Satisfaction with Antenatal, Intrapartum, and Postpartum Care?

BIRTH, Issue 3 2000
A Randomized Controlled Trial
Background:Although policymakers have suggested that improving continuity of midwifery can increase women's satisfaction with care in childbirth, evidence based on randomized controlled trials is lacking. New models of care, such as birth centers and team midwife care, try to increase the continuity of care and caregiver. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new team midwife care program in the standard clinic and hospital environment on satisfaction with antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care in low-risk women in early pregnancy.Methods:Women at Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, were randomly allocated to team midwife care (n = 495) or standard care (n = 505) at booking in early pregnancy. Doctors attended most women in standard care, and continuity of the caregiver was lacking. Satisfaction was measured by means of a postal questionnaire 2 months after the birth.Results:Team midwife care was associated with increased satisfaction, and the differences between the groups were most noticeable for antenatal care, less noticeable for intrapartum care, and least noticeable for postpartum care. The study found no differences between team midwife care and standard care in medical interventions or in women's emotional well-being 2 months after the birth.Conclusion:Conclusions about which components of team midwife care were most important to increased satisfaction with antenatal care were difficult to draw, but data suggest that satisfaction with intrapartum care was related to continuity of the caregiver. [source]