Postoperative Monitoring (postoperative + monitoring)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Postoperative monitoring of lower limb free flaps with the Cook,Swartz implantable Doppler probe: A clinical trial

MICROSURGERY, Issue 5 2010
B.Med.Sc., P.G.Dip.Surg.Anat., Ph.D., Warren M. Rozen M.B.B.S.
Background: Free flaps to the lower limb have inherently high venous pressures, potentially impairing flap viability, which may lead to limb amputation if flap failure ensues. Adequate monitoring of flap perfusion is thus essential, with timely detection of flap compromise able to potentiate flap salvage. While clinical monitoring has been popularized, recent use of the implantable Doppler probe has been used with success in other free flap settings. Methods: A comparative study of 40 consecutive patients undergoing microvascular free flap reconstruction of lower limb defects was undertaken, with postoperative monitoring achieved with either clinical monitoring alone or the use of the Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler probe. Results: The use of the implantable Doppler probe was associated with salvage of 2/2 compromised flaps compared to salvage of 2/5 compromised flaps in the group undergoing clinical monitoring alone (salvage rate 100% vs. 40%, P = 0.28). While not statistically significant, this was a strong trend toward an improved flap salvage rate with the use of the implantable Doppler probe. There were no false positives or negatives in either group. One flap loss in the clinically monitored group resulted in limb amputation (the only amputation in the cohort). Conclusion: A trend toward early detection and salvage of flaps with anastomotic insufficiency was seen with the use of the Cook,Swartz implantable Doppler probe. These findings suggest a possible benefit of this technique as a stand-alone or adjunctive tool in the clinical monitoring of free flaps, with further investigation warranted into the broader application of these devices. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery 30:354,360, 2010. [source]


Postoperative monitoring of free flaps in UK plastic surgery units

MICROSURGERY, Issue 6 2005
Ch.B. (Hons.), M.R.C.S. (Eng.), N. Jallali B.Sc.
Monitoring free-tissue transfers in the postoperative period is valuable for detection of failing flaps. As well as conventional methods, a myriad of sophisticated techniques have been reported in the literature. Using a postal questionnaire, a survey was conducted to delineate current protocols employed in UK plastic surgery units. Data were received from 148 plastic surgeons in 51 units. All surgeons used clinical assessment, although there was significant disparity in the duration and frequency of postoperative monitoring. Adjuvant techniques such as laser Doppler flowmetry were routinely used by less than 20% of surgeons. We conclude that there is considerable variation in postoperative monitoring of free flaps, with significant clinical and resource implications. A protocol based on robust evidence is thus recommended. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery 25:469,472, 2005. [source]


Complications of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing: Four cases

LASERS IN SURGERY AND MEDICINE, Issue 3 2009
Douglas J. Fife MD
Abstract Background and Objective Fractional ablative laser therapy is a new modality which will likely be widely used due to its efficacy and limited side-effect profile. It is critical to recognize, characterize, and report complications in order to acknowledge the limits of therapeutic efficacy and to improve the safety of these devices. Study Design/Materials and Methods The photographs, treatment parameters, and clinical files of four female patients aged 54,67 who had scarring or ectropion after fractional CO2 laser resurfacing on the face or neck were carefully reviewed to search for any possible linking factors. Results Patient 1 developed erosions and swelling of the right lower eyelid 2 days postoperatively, which developed into scarring and an ectropion. Patient 2 developed linear erosions and beefy red swelling on the right side of the neck which developed into a tender, band-like scar over 1-month. Patient 3 developed stinging and yellow exudate in multiple areas of the neck 3 days postoperatively. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite appropriate treatment, she developed multiple areas of irregular texture and linear streaking which developed into scars. Patient 4 developed an asymptomatic patchy, soft eschar with yellowish change on the left side of the neck. Azithromycin was started, however at 2-week follow-up she had fibrotic streaking which developed into horizontal scars and a vertical platysmal band. The treatment and final outcome of each patient are described. Conclusion Scarring after fractional CO2 laser therapy may be due to overly aggressive treatments in sensitive areas (including excessive energy, density, or both), lack of technical finesse, associated infection, or idiopathic. Care should be taken when treating sensitive areas such as the eyelids, upper neck, and especially the lower neck and chest by using lower energy and density. Postoperative infections may lead to scarring and may be prevented by careful taking of history, vigilant postoperative monitoring and/or prophylactic antibiotics. Lasers Surg. Med. 41:179,184, 2009. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Postoperative monitoring of lower limb free flaps with the Cook,Swartz implantable Doppler probe: A clinical trial

MICROSURGERY, Issue 5 2010
B.Med.Sc., P.G.Dip.Surg.Anat., Ph.D., Warren M. Rozen M.B.B.S.
Background: Free flaps to the lower limb have inherently high venous pressures, potentially impairing flap viability, which may lead to limb amputation if flap failure ensues. Adequate monitoring of flap perfusion is thus essential, with timely detection of flap compromise able to potentiate flap salvage. While clinical monitoring has been popularized, recent use of the implantable Doppler probe has been used with success in other free flap settings. Methods: A comparative study of 40 consecutive patients undergoing microvascular free flap reconstruction of lower limb defects was undertaken, with postoperative monitoring achieved with either clinical monitoring alone or the use of the Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler probe. Results: The use of the implantable Doppler probe was associated with salvage of 2/2 compromised flaps compared to salvage of 2/5 compromised flaps in the group undergoing clinical monitoring alone (salvage rate 100% vs. 40%, P = 0.28). While not statistically significant, this was a strong trend toward an improved flap salvage rate with the use of the implantable Doppler probe. There were no false positives or negatives in either group. One flap loss in the clinically monitored group resulted in limb amputation (the only amputation in the cohort). Conclusion: A trend toward early detection and salvage of flaps with anastomotic insufficiency was seen with the use of the Cook,Swartz implantable Doppler probe. These findings suggest a possible benefit of this technique as a stand-alone or adjunctive tool in the clinical monitoring of free flaps, with further investigation warranted into the broader application of these devices. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery 30:354,360, 2010. [source]


Postoperative monitoring of free flaps in UK plastic surgery units

MICROSURGERY, Issue 6 2005
Ch.B. (Hons.), M.R.C.S. (Eng.), N. Jallali B.Sc.
Monitoring free-tissue transfers in the postoperative period is valuable for detection of failing flaps. As well as conventional methods, a myriad of sophisticated techniques have been reported in the literature. Using a postal questionnaire, a survey was conducted to delineate current protocols employed in UK plastic surgery units. Data were received from 148 plastic surgeons in 51 units. All surgeons used clinical assessment, although there was significant disparity in the duration and frequency of postoperative monitoring. Adjuvant techniques such as laser Doppler flowmetry were routinely used by less than 20% of surgeons. We conclude that there is considerable variation in postoperative monitoring of free flaps, with significant clinical and resource implications. A protocol based on robust evidence is thus recommended. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery 25:469,472, 2005. [source]


Monitoring free flaps using laser-induced fluorescence of indocyanine green: A preliminary experience

MICROSURGERY, Issue 7 2002
C. Holm M.D.
In a prospective, clinical study, the clinical utility of indocyanine green for intraoperative monitoring of free tissue transfer was evaluated. The study comprised 20 surgical patients undergoing elective microsurgical procedures. Indocyanine green angiography was performed intraoperatively, immediately after flap inset, and the operating team was blind to the fluoremetric findings. Thereafter, postoperative monitoring was done exclusively by clinical examination (color, temperature, time for recapillarization, and bleeding after puncture). Final outcome was compared with results of perioperative indocyanine (ICG)-imaging, and classified either as total flap loss, partial flap loss, or successful tissue transplantation. A total of 2 (10%) complications was recorded, and included one partial and one total flap loss. Both complications were detected by intraoperative ICG imaging. Another case of intraoperative subclinical arterial spasm at the place of microvascular anastomosis was revealed by dynamic ICG-videography. This flap did not develop postoperative complications. In conclusion, evaluation of perfusion by ICG imaging is feasible in all kinds of microsurgical flaps, irrespective of the type of tissue. Even though not meeting all the criteria of an ideal monitoring device, significant additional information can be obtained. In this study, cases with arterial spasm, venous congestion, and regional hypoperfusion were revealed by intraoperative ICG-videography. There was a strong correlation between intraoperative findings and clinical outcome. 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. MICROSURGERY 22:278,287 2002 [source]