Postmodern Theory (postmodern + theory)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Creation and Construction: On the Theological Appropriation of Postmodern Theory

MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 2 2002
Jan-Olav Henriksen
Postmodern theory can be appreciated by theological anthropology along the following lines: it interprets the cultural conditions that shape personal identity, including the elements of construction and contingency in identity-formation. It emphasizes the necessity for a multifaceted approach to the question about what it means to be human, and for avoiding closure. This is expressed in the doctrine of the human as created, as sinner and as restored,as none of these perspectives captures the whole picture. Postmodern theory also focuses on the importance of otherness for establishing identity, thereby offering a new way of interpreting human beings as created in the image of God. [source]


BEYOND THE SUBLIME: THE AESTHETICS OF THE ANALOGY OF BEING (PART ONE)

MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 3 2005
JOHN R. BETZ
This essay is concerned with modern and postmodern theories of the sublime and with a possible theological response to them. The essay first discusses the "modern sublime" (as typified in Kant) and the "postmodern sublime" (as typified in Jean-Luc Nancy), and shows how these versions of the sublime terminate in one or the other form of "pure immanence" and, hence, are not sublime in any standard sense of the term. The essay then argues, in a second part, for an aesthetic of the beautiful and the sublime based upon the theological doctrine of the analogy of being as articulated in the past century by Erich Przywara, S. J. [source]


The Way Out West: Development and the Rhetoric of Mobility in Postmodern Feminist Theory

HYPATIA, Issue 3 2000
ELIZABETH A. PRITCHARDArticle first published online: 9 JAN 200
In this essay, I trace a rhetorical affinity between feminist postmodern theory and an Enlightenment narrative of development. This affinity consists in the valorization of mobility and the repudiation of locatedness. Although feminists deploy this rhetoric in order to accommodate differences and to accustom readers to the instability that results from such accommodation, I show how this rhetoric works to justify Western colonial development and to efface women's very different experiences of mobility in the early twenty-first century. [source]