Plan Choice (plan + choice)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Plan Choice

  • health plan choice


  • Selected Abstracts


    Managed Care Quality of Care and Plan Choice in New York SCHIP

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 3 2009
    Hangsheng Liu
    Objective. To examine whether low-income parents of children enrolled in the New York State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) choose managed care plans with better quality of care. Data Sources. 2001 New York SCHIP evaluation data; 2001 New York State Managed Care Plan Performance Report; 2000 New York State Managed Care Enrollment Report. Study Design. Each market was defined as a county. A final sample of 2,325 new enrollees was analyzed after excluding those in markets with only one SCHIP plan. Plan quality was measured using seven Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (CAHPS) and three Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) scores. A conditional logit model was applied with plan and individual/family characteristics as covariates. Principle Findings. There were 30 plans in the 45 defined markets. The choice probability increased 2.5 percentage points for each unit increase in the average CAHPS score, and the association was significantly larger in children with special health care needs. However, HEDIS did not show any statistically significant association with plan choice. Conclusions. Low-income parents do choose managed care plans with higher CAHPS scores for their newly enrolled children, suggesting that overall quality could improve over time because of the dynamics of enrollment. [source]


    Commentary: What Is the Right Price in Discrete Choice Models of Health Plan Choice?

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 6p1 2007
    Roger Feldman
    First page of article [source]


    Factors Affecting Plan Choice and Unmet Need among Supplemental Security Income Eligible Children with Disabilities

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 5p1 2005
    Jean M. Mitchell
    Objective. To evaluate factors affecting plan choice (partially capitated managed care [MC] option versus the fee-for-service [FFS] system) and unmet needs for health care services among children who qualified for supplemental security income (SSI) because of a disability. Data Sources. We conducted telephone interviews during the summer and fall of 2002 with a random sample of close to 1,088 caregivers of SSI eligible children who resided in the District of Columbia. Research Design. We employed a two-step procedure where we first estimated plan choice and then constructed a selectivity correction to control for the potential selection bias associated with plan choice. We included the selectivity correction, the dummy variable indicating plan choice and other exogenous regressors in the second stage equations predicting unmet need. The dependent variables in the second stage equations include: (1) having an unmet need for any service or equipment; (2) having an unmet need for physician or hospital services; (3) having an unmet need for medical equipment; (4) having an unmet need for prescription drugs; (5) having an unmet need for dental care. Principal Findings. More disabled children (those with birth defects, chronic conditions, and/or more limitations in activities of daily living) were more likely to enroll in FFS. Children of caregivers with some college education were more likely to opt for FFS, whereas children from higher income households were more prone to enroll in the partially capitated MC plan. Children in FFS were 9.9 percentage points more likely than children enrolled in partially capitated MC to experience an unmet need for any type of health care services (p<.01), while FFS children were 4.5 percentage points more likely than partially capitated MC enrollees to incur a medical equipment unmet need (p<.05). FFS children were also more likely than partially capitated MC enrollees to experience unmet needs for prescription drugs and dental care, however these differences were only marginally significant. Conclusions. We speculate that the case management services available under the MC option, low Medicaid FFS reimbursements and provider availability account for some of the differences in unmet need that exist between partially capitated MC and FFS enrollees. [source]


    The Effect of Benefits, Premiums, and Health Risk on Health Plan Choice in the Medicare Program

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 4p1 2004
    Adam Atherly
    Objective. To estimate the effect of Medicare+Choice (M+C) plan premiums and benefits and individual beneficiary characteristics on the probability of enrollment in a Medicare+Choice plan. Data Source. Individual data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey were combined with plan-level data from Medicare Compare. Study Design. Health plan choices, including the Medicare+Choice/Fee-for-Service decision and the choice of plan within the M+C sector, were modeled using limited information maximum likelihood nested logit. Principal Findings. Premiums have a significant effect on plan selection, with an estimated out-of-pocket premium elasticity of ,0.134 and an insurer-perspective elasticity of ,4.57. Beneficiaries are responsive to plan characteristics, with prescription drug benefits having the largest marginal effect. Sicker beneficiaries were more likely to choose plans with drug benefits and diabetics were more likely to pick plans with vision coverage. Conclusions. Plan characteristics significantly impact beneficiaries' decisions to enroll in Medicare M+C plans and individuals sort themselves systematically into plans based on individual characteristics. [source]


    Employee choice of flexible spending account participation and health plan

    HEALTH ECONOMICS, Issue 7 2008
    Barton H. Hamilton
    Abstract Despite the fact that flexible spending accounts (FSAs) are becoming an increasingly popular employer-provided health benefit, there has been very little empirical study of FSA use among employees at the individual level. This study contributes to the literature on FSAs using a unique data set that provides three years of employee-level-matched benefits data. Motivated by the theoretical model of FSA choice presented in Cardon and Showalter (J. Health Econ. 2001; 20(6):935,954), we examine the determinants of FSA participation and contribution levels using cross-sectional and random-effect two-part models. FSA participation and health plan choice are also modeled jointly in each year using conditional logit models. We find that, even after controlling for a number of other demographic characteristics, non-whites are less likely to participate in the FSA program, have lower contributions conditional on participation, and have a lower probability of switching to new lower cost share, higher premium plans when they were introduced. We also find evidence that choosing health plans with more expected out-of-pocket expenses is correlated with participation in the FSA program. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Managed Care Quality of Care and Plan Choice in New York SCHIP

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 3 2009
    Hangsheng Liu
    Objective. To examine whether low-income parents of children enrolled in the New York State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) choose managed care plans with better quality of care. Data Sources. 2001 New York SCHIP evaluation data; 2001 New York State Managed Care Plan Performance Report; 2000 New York State Managed Care Enrollment Report. Study Design. Each market was defined as a county. A final sample of 2,325 new enrollees was analyzed after excluding those in markets with only one SCHIP plan. Plan quality was measured using seven Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (CAHPS) and three Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) scores. A conditional logit model was applied with plan and individual/family characteristics as covariates. Principle Findings. There were 30 plans in the 45 defined markets. The choice probability increased 2.5 percentage points for each unit increase in the average CAHPS score, and the association was significantly larger in children with special health care needs. However, HEDIS did not show any statistically significant association with plan choice. Conclusions. Low-income parents do choose managed care plans with higher CAHPS scores for their newly enrolled children, suggesting that overall quality could improve over time because of the dynamics of enrollment. [source]


    Factors Affecting Plan Choice and Unmet Need among Supplemental Security Income Eligible Children with Disabilities

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 5p1 2005
    Jean M. Mitchell
    Objective. To evaluate factors affecting plan choice (partially capitated managed care [MC] option versus the fee-for-service [FFS] system) and unmet needs for health care services among children who qualified for supplemental security income (SSI) because of a disability. Data Sources. We conducted telephone interviews during the summer and fall of 2002 with a random sample of close to 1,088 caregivers of SSI eligible children who resided in the District of Columbia. Research Design. We employed a two-step procedure where we first estimated plan choice and then constructed a selectivity correction to control for the potential selection bias associated with plan choice. We included the selectivity correction, the dummy variable indicating plan choice and other exogenous regressors in the second stage equations predicting unmet need. The dependent variables in the second stage equations include: (1) having an unmet need for any service or equipment; (2) having an unmet need for physician or hospital services; (3) having an unmet need for medical equipment; (4) having an unmet need for prescription drugs; (5) having an unmet need for dental care. Principal Findings. More disabled children (those with birth defects, chronic conditions, and/or more limitations in activities of daily living) were more likely to enroll in FFS. Children of caregivers with some college education were more likely to opt for FFS, whereas children from higher income households were more prone to enroll in the partially capitated MC plan. Children in FFS were 9.9 percentage points more likely than children enrolled in partially capitated MC to experience an unmet need for any type of health care services (p<.01), while FFS children were 4.5 percentage points more likely than partially capitated MC enrollees to incur a medical equipment unmet need (p<.05). FFS children were also more likely than partially capitated MC enrollees to experience unmet needs for prescription drugs and dental care, however these differences were only marginally significant. Conclusions. We speculate that the case management services available under the MC option, low Medicaid FFS reimbursements and provider availability account for some of the differences in unmet need that exist between partially capitated MC and FFS enrollees. [source]


    Offline adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer using cone beam computed tomography

    JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 2 2009
    F Foroudi
    Summary We investigated if an adaptive radiotherapy approach based on cone beam CT (CBCT) acquired during radical treatment was feasible and resulted in improved dosimetric outcomes for bladder cancer patients compared to conventional planning and treatment protocol. A secondary aim was to compare a conventional plan with a theoretical online process where positioning is based on soft tissue position on a daily basis and treatment plan choice is based on bladder size. A conventional treatment plan was derived from a planning CT scan in the radical radiotherapy of five patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. In this offline adaptive protocol using CBCT, the patients had 10 CBCT: daily CBCT for the first five fractions and then CBCT scan on a weekly basis. The first five daily CBCT in each patient were used to create a single adaptive plan for treatment from fraction eight onwards. A different process using the planning CT and the first five daily CBCT was used to create small, average and large bladder volumes, giving rise to small, average and large adaptive bladder treatment plans, respectively. In a retrospective analysis using the CBCT scans, we compared the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage using three protocols: (i) conventional; (ii) offline adaptive; and (iii) online adaptive with choice of ,plan of the day'. Daily CBCT prolonged treatment time by an average of 7 min. Two of the five patients demonstrated such variation in CTV that an offline adaptive plan was used for treatment after the first five CBCT. Comparing the offline adaptive plan with the conventional plan, the CTV coverage improved from a minimum of 60.1 to 94.7% in subsequent weekly CBCT. Using the CBCT data, modelling an online adaptive protocol showed that coverage of the CTV by the 95% prescribed dose line by small, medium and large adaptive plans were 34.9, 67.4 and 90.7% of occasions, respectively. More normal tissue was irradiated using a conventional CTV to planning target volume margin (1.5 cm) compared to an online adaptive process (0.5 cm). An offline adaptive strategy improves dose coverage in certain patients to the CTV and results in a higher conformity index compared to conventional planning. Further research in online adaptive radiation therapy for bladder cancer is indicated. [source]


    The Effect of Benefits, Premiums, and Health Risk on Health Plan Choice in the Medicare Program

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 4p1 2004
    Adam Atherly
    Objective. To estimate the effect of Medicare+Choice (M+C) plan premiums and benefits and individual beneficiary characteristics on the probability of enrollment in a Medicare+Choice plan. Data Source. Individual data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey were combined with plan-level data from Medicare Compare. Study Design. Health plan choices, including the Medicare+Choice/Fee-for-Service decision and the choice of plan within the M+C sector, were modeled using limited information maximum likelihood nested logit. Principal Findings. Premiums have a significant effect on plan selection, with an estimated out-of-pocket premium elasticity of ,0.134 and an insurer-perspective elasticity of ,4.57. Beneficiaries are responsive to plan characteristics, with prescription drug benefits having the largest marginal effect. Sicker beneficiaries were more likely to choose plans with drug benefits and diabetics were more likely to pick plans with vision coverage. Conclusions. Plan characteristics significantly impact beneficiaries' decisions to enroll in Medicare M+C plans and individuals sort themselves systematically into plans based on individual characteristics. [source]