Palliative Care Nurses (palliative + care_nurse)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Palliative Care Nurses

  • specialist palliative care nurse


  • Selected Abstracts


    Exploring nursing outcomes for patients with advanced cancer following intervention by Macmillan specialist palliative care nurses

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 6 2003
    Jessica Corner BSc PhD RGN OncCert
    Background.,Little information exists about the outcomes from nursing interventions, and few studies report new approaches to evaluating the complex web of effects that may result from specialist nursing care. Aims.,The aim of this study was to explore nursing outcomes for patients with advanced cancer that may be identified as resulting from the care of a Macmillan specialist palliative care nurse. Methods/instruments.,Seventy-six patients referred to 12 United Kingdom Macmillan specialist palliative care nursing services participated in a longitudinal study of their care over 28 days. Patients were interviewed and completed the European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Scale and the Palliative Care Outcomes Scale at referral, and 3, 7 and 28 days following referral to a Macmillan specialist palliative care nursing service. A nominated carer was interviewed at baseline and 28 days. Notes recorded by Macmillan specialist palliative care nurses in relation to each patient case were analysed. Findings.,Significant improvements in emotional (P = 003) and cognitive functioning (P = 003) were identified in changes in patients' European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Scale scores, and in Palliative Care Outcomes Scale patient anxiety scores (P = 0003), from baseline to day 7. Analysis of case study data indicated that overall positive outcomes of care from Macmillan specialist palliative care nursing intervention were achieved in 42 (55%) cases. Study limitations.,Sample attrition due to patients' deteriorating condition limited the value of data from the quality of life measures. The method developed for evaluating nursing outcomes using data from patient and carer interviews and nursing records was limited by a lack of focus on outcomes of care in these data sources. Conclusions.,A method was developed for evaluating outcomes of nursing care in complex situations such as care of people who are dying. Positive outcomes of care for patients that were directly attributable to the care provided by Macmillan specialist palliative care nurses were found for the majority of patients. For a small number of patients, negative outcomes of care were identified. [source]


    Dying at home: community nurses' views on the impact of informal carers on cancer patients' place of death

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER CARE, Issue 5 2010
    B. JACK phd, bsc (econ), head of research, scholarship
    JACK B. & O'BRIEN M. (2010) European Journal of Cancer Care19, 636,642 Dying at home: community nurses' views on the impact of informal carers on cancer patients' place of death Giving patients with cancer a choice in where they want to die including the choice to die at home if they so wish, underpin the recent UK government policies and is embedded in the End of Life Care Programme. However, this presents increasing challenges for the informal carers particularly with an increasingly aging population. Despite the policy initiatives, there remain a persistent number of patients with cancer who had chosen to die at home being admitted to hospital in the last days and hours of life. A qualitative study using two focus group interviews with community nurses (district nurses and community specialist palliative care nurses) was undertaken across two primary care trusts in the north-west of England. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. The results indicated that informal carer burden was a key reason for prompting hospital admission. Recommendations for the development of a carer assessment tool with appropriate supportive interventions are made. [source]


    Exploring nursing outcomes for patients with advanced cancer following intervention by Macmillan specialist palliative care nurses

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 6 2003
    Jessica Corner BSc PhD RGN OncCert
    Background.,Little information exists about the outcomes from nursing interventions, and few studies report new approaches to evaluating the complex web of effects that may result from specialist nursing care. Aims.,The aim of this study was to explore nursing outcomes for patients with advanced cancer that may be identified as resulting from the care of a Macmillan specialist palliative care nurse. Methods/instruments.,Seventy-six patients referred to 12 United Kingdom Macmillan specialist palliative care nursing services participated in a longitudinal study of their care over 28 days. Patients were interviewed and completed the European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Scale and the Palliative Care Outcomes Scale at referral, and 3, 7 and 28 days following referral to a Macmillan specialist palliative care nursing service. A nominated carer was interviewed at baseline and 28 days. Notes recorded by Macmillan specialist palliative care nurses in relation to each patient case were analysed. Findings.,Significant improvements in emotional (P = 003) and cognitive functioning (P = 003) were identified in changes in patients' European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Scale scores, and in Palliative Care Outcomes Scale patient anxiety scores (P = 0003), from baseline to day 7. Analysis of case study data indicated that overall positive outcomes of care from Macmillan specialist palliative care nursing intervention were achieved in 42 (55%) cases. Study limitations.,Sample attrition due to patients' deteriorating condition limited the value of data from the quality of life measures. The method developed for evaluating nursing outcomes using data from patient and carer interviews and nursing records was limited by a lack of focus on outcomes of care in these data sources. Conclusions.,A method was developed for evaluating outcomes of nursing care in complex situations such as care of people who are dying. Positive outcomes of care for patients that were directly attributable to the care provided by Macmillan specialist palliative care nurses were found for the majority of patients. For a small number of patients, negative outcomes of care were identified. [source]


    The family and nurse in partnership: Providing day-to-day care for rural cancer patients

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 2 2005
    Lesley M. Wilkes
    Abstract Objective:,To explore demands made on family members in managing symptoms and providing for the day-to-day care of relatives with cancer in rural New South Wales and how specialist palliative care nurses support these family members. Design:,Cross sectional qualitative study. Setting:,Seven health centres across rural New South Wales that cover a broad geographical area and reflect the diversity in economic conditions, population density and distance from three major urban centres in New South Wales. Subjects:,The study involved two groups of participants. The first group consisted of one or more members of families of oncology patients who were accessed through health workers at the seven centres. Nineteen family members from 17 families were interviewed. The second group comprised 10 nursing staff working as specialist palliative care nurses across the same geographical area as the families. Main outcome measures:,Physical care and symptom management were the two main areas of interest. Results:,The rural experience of caring for palliative care patients was challenging, with support nurses needing to take into consideration all aspects of the patients' and families' living environments. Conclusion:,There is a need for equipment and basic resources to be readily available to practitioners, funding for ongoing education and 24-h care. [source]