Overweight Status (overweight + status)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Urban-Rural Differences in Overweight Status and Physical Inactivity Among US Children Aged 10-17 Years

THE JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2008
Jihong Liu ScD
ABSTRACT:,Context: Few studies have examined the prevalence of overweight status and physical inactivity among children and adolescents living in rural America. Purpose: We examined urban and rural differences in the prevalence of overweight status and physical inactivity among US children. Methods: Data were drawn from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health, restricted to children aged 10-17 (unweighted N = 47,757). Overweight status was defined as the gender- and age-specific body mass index (BMI) values at or above the 95th percentile. Physical inactivity was defined using parentally reported moderate-to-vigorous intensity leisure-time physical activity lasting for at least 20 minutes/d on less than three days in the past week. The 2003 Urban Influence Codes were used to define rurality. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine urban/rural differences in overweight status and physical inactivity after adjusting for potential confounders. Findings: Overweight status was more prevalent among rural (16.5%) than urban children (14.3%). After adjusting for covariates including physical activity, rural children had higher odds of being overweight than urban children (OR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01-1.25). Minorities, children from families with lower socioeconomic status, and children living in the South experienced higher odds of being overweight. More urban children (29.1%) were physically inactive than rural children (25.2%) and this pattern remained after adjusting for covariates (OR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.73-0.86). Conclusions: The higher prevalence of overweight among rural children, despite modestly higher physical activity levels, calls for further research into effective intervention programs specifically tailored for rural children. [source]


Overweight and perception of overweight as predictors of smokeless tobacco use and of cigarette smoking in a cohort of Swedish adolescents

ADDICTION, Issue 4 2009
Maria Paola Caria
ABSTRACT Aims To study the association between measured or perceived overweight in adolescence and subsequent uptake of cigarette smoking and of the Swedish smokeless tobacco ,snus' (oral moist snuff). Design Population-based prospective cohort study with 7 years' follow-up. Setting Self-administered questionnaires and school nurses' visits. Participants A total of 2922 children of both sexes and mean age 11.6 years at recruitment, resident in the Stockholm region, Sweden. Measurements Tobacco use was self-reported at baseline and on six subsequent surveys. Subjects' height and weight were measured by school nurses during the first 4 years, self-reported thereafter. Overweight perception was self-reported at the age of 15 years. Findings Overweight and perception of overweight were not associated with subsequent uptake of either smoking or snus among males. Among females, overweight at baseline was associated with uptake of smoking [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09,1.63], but not of snus. A similar pattern was found with overweight status during follow-up. Among girls with low-educated parents, overweight at baseline predicted the uptake of both snus and smoking. Among 15-year-old females who never used tobacco perceived overweight was associated with subsequent uptake of smoking (adjusted HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.20,2.46), but not of snus. Conclusions In Sweden, adolescent girls with actual or perceived overweight are at increased risk to start smoking, while indications that this increased risk applies to smokeless tobacco (snus) are limited to girls of low socio-economic status. [source]


Are two informants better than one?

EUROPEAN EATING DISORDERS REVIEW, Issue 6 2007
Parent, child agreement on the eating styles of children who are overweight
Abstract Aim It is currently unknown to what extent the view of a child with overweight on its' own eating behaviour converges with parental perception regarding this behaviour and how parent,child agreement is influenced by overweight status and age. Method Youngsters (N,=,498; range 7,15 years; 37% boys) referred for weight treatment to an outpatient University centre filled in the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire,child version (DEBQ-child version; Van Strien & Braet, unpublished work), prior to treatment, while their parents reported on their child's eating behaviour by completing the DEBQ-parent version (Braet & Van Strien, 1997). Results Parents scored significantly higher when reporting on the emotional eating and external eating behaviour of their child, while they scored lower for restrained eating (all p,<,0.001). Comparisons between the subscales of the DEBQ-parent version and the DEBQ-child version revealed significant positive correlations of r,=,0.45 for emotional eating, r,=,0.35 for external eating and r,=,0.36 for restrained eating (all p,<,0.01); convergence is lowest for the age group younger than 10 (p,<,0.05). Both versions of the DEBQ displayed low correlations with the degree of overweight of the child. Discussion Parents and children displayed moderate to good agreement with regard to emotional eating, external eating and restrained eating. However when only one perspective can be assessed, possible biases must be taken into account. In that case, the use of appropriate age-specific norms is indicated. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [source]


Maternal employment and overweight children: does timing matter?

HEALTH ECONOMICS, Issue 8 2008
Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder
Abstract Recent literature has shown consistent evidence of a positive relationship between maternal employment and children's overweight status. These studies largely use average weekly work hours over the child's life to measure employment. This paper specifically aims at exploring the importance of the timing of employment. Using various econometric techniques to control for observable and unobservable child and family characteristics, the results show that full-time maternal employment during mid-childhood positively affects the probability of being overweight at age 16. There is no evidence that part-time or full-time employment at earlier/later ages affects this probability. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Association between maternal seafood consumption before pregnancy and fetal growth: evidence for an association in overweight women.

PAEDIATRIC & PERINATAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 1 2009
The EDEN mother-child cohort
Summary Studies in countries with high seafood consumption have shown a benefit on fetal growth and child development. The objective of our study was to determine the association between seafood consumption in French pregnant women and fetal growth. Pregnant women included in the EDEN mother-child cohort study completed two food frequency questionnaires on their usual diet in the year before and during the last 3 months of pregnancy (n = 1805). Fetal circumferences were measured by ultrasound and anthropometry at birth. Variables were compared across tertiles of the mother's seafood consumption using multiple linear regression to adjust for confounding variables. Analyses were stratified by maternal overweight status because of an interaction between maternal seafood consumption and her body mass index (P < 0.01). There was no association between seafood intake and fetal growth in the whole sample of women. For overweight women (n = 464), higher consumption of seafood before pregnancy was associated with higher fetal biparietal and abdominal circumferences and anthropometric measures. From the lowest to the highest tertiles, mean birthweight was 167 g higher (P = 0.002). No significant association was found with consumption at the end of pregnancy. In conclusion, high seafood consumption before pregnancy is positively associated with fetal growth in overweight women. [source]


Urban-Rural Differences in Overweight Status and Physical Inactivity Among US Children Aged 10-17 Years

THE JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2008
Jihong Liu ScD
ABSTRACT:,Context: Few studies have examined the prevalence of overweight status and physical inactivity among children and adolescents living in rural America. Purpose: We examined urban and rural differences in the prevalence of overweight status and physical inactivity among US children. Methods: Data were drawn from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health, restricted to children aged 10-17 (unweighted N = 47,757). Overweight status was defined as the gender- and age-specific body mass index (BMI) values at or above the 95th percentile. Physical inactivity was defined using parentally reported moderate-to-vigorous intensity leisure-time physical activity lasting for at least 20 minutes/d on less than three days in the past week. The 2003 Urban Influence Codes were used to define rurality. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine urban/rural differences in overweight status and physical inactivity after adjusting for potential confounders. Findings: Overweight status was more prevalent among rural (16.5%) than urban children (14.3%). After adjusting for covariates including physical activity, rural children had higher odds of being overweight than urban children (OR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01-1.25). Minorities, children from families with lower socioeconomic status, and children living in the South experienced higher odds of being overweight. More urban children (29.1%) were physically inactive than rural children (25.2%) and this pattern remained after adjusting for covariates (OR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.73-0.86). Conclusions: The higher prevalence of overweight among rural children, despite modestly higher physical activity levels, calls for further research into effective intervention programs specifically tailored for rural children. [source]