Ovine Milk (ovine + milk)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


SENSORY AND INSTRUMENTAL EVALUATIONS OF TEXTURE IN CHEESES MADE FROM OVINE MILKS WITH DIFFERING FAT CONTENTS

JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 2 2002
A. IRIGOYEN
ABSTRACT The present study considers the influence of reducing the fat content of ovine milk on the sensory and instrumental texture characteristics of the resulting cheeses. Three manufacturing runs were performed. In each run three cheese batches were manufactured using milks with differing percentage fat contents (8%, 4%, and 2% fat). Analysis of cheese samples was performed at 60, 90, and 120 days of ripening. The instrumental method used to evaluate cheese texture was uniaxial compression at constant speed, taking readings of stress, strain, and modulus of elasticity (E). Statisticalanalysis revealed differences forboth the differentfat contents and the ripening times considered. Instrumental parameter values increased with lower cheese fat contents; with a 20% reduction in the fat to dry matter content from full-fat to reduced-fat cheeses, resulting in a 35% increase in maximum stress and in the slope of the stress-strain curve at the end of ripening. The greatest sensory differences between samples were recorded for firmness. [source]


Nutritional and therapeutic value of fermented caprine milk

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DAIRY TECHNOLOGY, Issue 2 2010
ANAC, VEDRAN SLA
Caprine milk is a nutritional and therapeutic food. The unique and beneficial characteristics of caprine milk that are superior to bovine milk include: better digestibility; greater buffering capacity; fat globules that are smaller in diameter and better distributed in the milk emulsion; higher content of short-chain fatty acids in the milk fat; higher content of zinc, iron and magnesium; stronger lactoperoxidase (antimicrobial) system as well as better immunological and antibacterial characteristics. The larger amounts of some minerals, such as calcium, zinc and magnesium, in caprine milk may influence the growth of lactic acid bacteria since they are a normal part of some enzymatic complexes involved in lactose fermentation. The higher whey protein content could also be significant because Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacteria grow better in the presence of higher levels of some amino acids (valine, glycine, hystidine). The use of caprine and ovine milk in cheesemaking is well known, but the production of fermented caprine milk via probiotics has not yet been developed, although many studies have highlighted the requirements for production of that kind of healthy food. During fermentation caprine milk loses its characteristic ,goaty' taste, which is unacceptable to many consumers. Moreover, the nutritive value of caprine milk increases during fermentation. The rise in the number of goat farms in Croatia has created the need to find other products that can be produced using caprine milk. According to the present situation in Croatia, there is no real possibility of producing fermented caprine milk for the global market, but many studies of fermented caprine milk have been performed. [source]


Recent developments in antibody-based analytical methods for the differentiation of milk from different species

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DAIRY TECHNOLOGY, Issue 3 2003
Golfo Moatsou
The antibody-based analytical methods for the detection of milk from different species that have been developed in recent years are, for the most part, various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) configurations. Polyclonal and, more recently, monoclonal antibodies against total or individual caseins, whey proteins and synthetic peptides corresponding to milk proteins sequences have been used. The assays have been successfully applied to the detection of substitution of ovine or caprine milk by bovine milk and of ovine milk by caprine milk in raw and heat-treated milks and cheeses. [source]


A study of the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus in bovine, ovine and caprine milk

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DAIRY TECHNOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
Alexandra P Drakoularakou
The fermentation of reconstituted bovine, ovine and caprine milks with Lactobacillus acidophilus was investigated. Better growth of Lb. acidophilus was observed in ovine milk, but higher acidities developed in caprine milk. The high acidity produced after 12 h of fermentation (pH 3.9) created a hostile environment for the survival of the microorganism in caprine milk. [source]


Effect of milk source on the rheological properties of yogurt during the gelation process

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DAIRY TECHNOLOGY, Issue 3 2001
R Y Jumah
This paper presents research on the effect of milk source on the rheological properties of curd during the gelation process of yogurt. The highest value for viscosity was exhibited by ovine milk, followed by caprine, bovine and camel milks. For bovine, ovine and caprine milk, three different transient viscosity stages were identified and described by mathematical expressions, whereas camel milk showed no significant variation in viscosity during gelation. The chemical composition of milk, namely total solids and protein content, has a major effect on the rheological properties of curd. A power law model allows the determination of the flow behaviour index and the consistency coefficient of curd made from different milk sources. [source]


Comparison of the characteristics of set type yoghurt made from ovine milk of different fat content

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, Issue 9 2007
Stelios Kaminarides
Summary Characteristics of four types of yoghurt made from ovine milk containing 6.6%, 3.8%, 2.3%, or 0.9% fat respectively were studied. The yoghurt produced from ovine milk with high fat had the highest flavour and texture scores, fat and total solids content and firmness, but the lowest syneresis, lactic acid and galactose content. Low-fat yoghurts can be successfully produced from homogenised ovine milk and these yoghurts did not significantly differ from that of full fat yoghurt in values for ash, lactose, citric acid, pyruvic acid, pH and non-protein nitrogen. The HPLC procedure that was used for the determination of lactose was appropriate for the simultaneous determination of galactose and organic acids in milk or yoghurt. A total of sixteen volatile compounds were identified in ovine yoghurt and the main volatile flavour compounds in yoghurt on 2 days were acetic acid, acetaldehyde, acetone, diacetyl, 2-butanone, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone and 3-methyl-2-butanone. [source]


Influence of the Coagulant Level on Early Proteolysis in Ovine Cheese-like Systems Made with Sterilized Milk and Cynara cardunculus

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, Issue 7 2004
S.V. Silva
ABSTRACT: The effect of coagulant level on the quality and quantity of protein breakdown during the first 24 h of ripening of cheese-like systems, manufactured with sterilized ovine milk using crude aqueous extracts of Cynara cardunculus as coagulant, was experimentally assessed. Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed on both water-soluble and water-insoluble cheese extracts to monitor the casein degradation pattern; the ripening extension index and the ripening depth index were thus calculated. Peptides from the water-soluble fraction were isolated by reverse-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography and partially sequenced by Edman degradation. Higher residual coagulant levels in curdled milk led to earlier breakdown of caseins, as expected. The primary cleavage sites were Phe105-Met106 in k-casein, Phe23-Val24 in ,s1 -casein, and Leu127-Thr128, Ser142-Trp143, Leu165-Ser166, and Leu190-Tyr191 in ,-casein. [source]


SENSORY PROFILE OF FLAVOR AND ODOR CHARACTERISTICS IN RONCAL CHEESE MADE FROM RAW EWE'S MILK

JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 5 2002
PATRICIA LARR┴YOZ
ABSTRACT Roncal cheese is made from raw ovine milk and is regulated by an Appellation of Origin. This cheese variety is quite popular with consumers because of its special properties, which are unlike those of other ewe's-milk cheeses. To date there have been no studies aimed at characterizing the flavor and odor attributes of Roncal cheese. To remedy this situation, sensory analysis has been performed using Roncal cheese samples collected from artisanal and industrial cheese-making establishments. The cheeses were made at three different times of year (winter, spring, and summer) and were ripened for four or eight months. Sensory descriptors were generated, and after discussion suitable descriptors for describing and discriminating among Roncal cheese samples were selected by multivariate analysis. In all, 19 descriptors were employed, namely: odor: cream, meat broth, olive, toffee, liquid caramel, toasted, acetic acid, sweat, acidified milk, ammonia, leather, stable straw, wool, and odor intensity. flavor: characteristic flavor, acetic acid, sweat, butyric acid, and flavor intensity. [source]


SENSORY AND INSTRUMENTAL EVALUATIONS OF TEXTURE IN CHEESES MADE FROM OVINE MILKS WITH DIFFERING FAT CONTENTS

JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 2 2002
A. IRIGOYEN
ABSTRACT The present study considers the influence of reducing the fat content of ovine milk on the sensory and instrumental texture characteristics of the resulting cheeses. Three manufacturing runs were performed. In each run three cheese batches were manufactured using milks with differing percentage fat contents (8%, 4%, and 2% fat). Analysis of cheese samples was performed at 60, 90, and 120 days of ripening. The instrumental method used to evaluate cheese texture was uniaxial compression at constant speed, taking readings of stress, strain, and modulus of elasticity (E). Statisticalanalysis revealed differences forboth the differentfat contents and the ripening times considered. Instrumental parameter values increased with lower cheese fat contents; with a 20% reduction in the fat to dry matter content from full-fat to reduced-fat cheeses, resulting in a 35% increase in maximum stress and in the slope of the stress-strain curve at the end of ripening. The greatest sensory differences between samples were recorded for firmness. [source]