Oral Cavity Cancer (oral + cavity_cancer)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Using Stereolithographic Models to Plan Mandibular Reconstruction for Advanced Oral Cavity Cancer

THE LARYNGOSCOPE, Issue 4 2007
Eric Y. Ro MD
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Oral cavity cancer in developed and in developing countries: Population-based incidence

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 3 2010
Marianna de Camargo Cancela DDS
Abstract Background. The incidence of oral cavity cancer (OCC) is not well documented because it is rarely described in accord with the anatomic definition but is usually grouped with oropharyngeal subsites. We studied the incidence of OCC in developed and in developing countries. Methods. The age-standardized and age-specific incidence rates of OCC were calculated for the period 1998-2002, using the topographic definition used by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), based on data from CI5-IX. Results. The highest rates are observed in Pakistan, Brazil, India, and France and were consistent with country-specific risk factors and their prevalence. Conclusions. In developing countries, people are exposed to a wider range of risk factors, starting at younger ages, and primary prevention measures and policies are needed. Awareness of professionals must be improved to identify people at risk and target them for prevention and to minimize the consequences of OCC. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2010 [source]


Clinical grading of oral mucosa by curve-fitting of corrected autofluorescence using diffuse reflectance spectra

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 6 2010
Rupananda Jayachandra Mallia PhD
Abstract Background Laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and diffuse reflectance (DR) were collectively used in this clinical study to improve early oral cancer diagnosis and tissue grading. Methods LIAF and DR emission from oral mucosa were recorded on a fiber-optic spectrometer by illumination with a 404-nm diode laser and tungsten halogen lamp in 36 healthy volunteers and 40 lesions of 20 patients. Results Absorption dips in LIAF spectra at 545 and 575 nm resulting from changes in oxygenated hemoglobin were corrected using DR spectra of the same site. These corrected spectra were curve-fitted using Gaussian spectral functions to determine constituent emission peaks and their relative contribution. The Gaussian peak intensity and area ratios F500/F635 and F500/F685 were found to be useful indicators of tissue transformation. The diagnostic capability of various ratios in differentiating healthy, hyperplastic, dysplastic, and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were examined using discrimination scatterplots. Conclusions The LIAF/DR technique, in conjunction with curve-fitting, differentiates different grades of dysplasia and SCC in this clinical trial and proves its potential for early detection of oral cavity cancer and tissue grading. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2010 [source]


Oral cavity cancer in developed and in developing countries: Population-based incidence

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 3 2010
Marianna de Camargo Cancela DDS
Abstract Background. The incidence of oral cavity cancer (OCC) is not well documented because it is rarely described in accord with the anatomic definition but is usually grouped with oropharyngeal subsites. We studied the incidence of OCC in developed and in developing countries. Methods. The age-standardized and age-specific incidence rates of OCC were calculated for the period 1998-2002, using the topographic definition used by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), based on data from CI5-IX. Results. The highest rates are observed in Pakistan, Brazil, India, and France and were consistent with country-specific risk factors and their prevalence. Conclusions. In developing countries, people are exposed to a wider range of risk factors, starting at younger ages, and primary prevention measures and policies are needed. Awareness of professionals must be improved to identify people at risk and target them for prevention and to minimize the consequences of OCC. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2010 [source]


Long-term survival in locally advanced oral cavity cancer: An analysis of patients treated with neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by surgery,

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 6 2005
Enzo Maria Ruggeri MD
Abstract Background. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been reported to be extremely active in head and neck cancer but has failed to give a statistically significant improvement in survival. Methods. From 1981 to 1994, 33 operable patients with locally advanced oral cavity cancer received cisplatin-based chemotherapy before surgery. Postoperative radiotherapy was performed in high-risk patients. Results. The overall clinical and pathologic complete response rates to neoadjuvant chemotherapy were 48% and 30%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 7.0 years (range, 0.3,15.3+ years), the 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 54.5% and 39.5%, and the disease-specific median survival was 6.6 years for all patients (8.3 and 2.3 years for stages III and IV, respectively). The univariate analysis showed a positive relationship between survival and male sex (p = .05), pathologic (p = .02), and clinical (p = .03) complete response. The Cox proportional hazard regression model confirmed the independent prognostic value of the clinical response with a 4.67 (95% CI, 1.70,12.86) hazard ratio. A second primary tumor occurred in six patients (18%), with a median of occurrence of 9 years (range, 7,11 years). Conclusions. This study confirms the prolonged survival expectancy largely exceeding 5 years for selected patients with stage IV and for most with stage III locally advanced oral cavity cancer achieving a clinical and/or pathologic complete response to chemotherapy. 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck27: XXX,XXX, 2005 [source]


Squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa: One institution's experience with 119 previously untreated patients,

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 4 2003
Eduardo M. Diaz Jr. MD, FACS
Abstract Background. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the buccal mucosa is a rare, but especially aggressive, form of oral cavity cancer, associated with a high rate of locoregional recurrence and poor survival. We reviewed our institution's experience with 119 consecutive, previously untreated patients with buccal SCC. Methods. We reviewed the charts of 250 patients who were seen at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between January, 1974, and December, 1993. Of these, 119 were untreated and were subsequently treated exclusively at our institution. Patients who were previously treated elsewhere or whose lesions arose in other sites and only secondarily involved the buccal mucosa were excluded. Results. Patients with T1- or T2-sized tumors had only a 78% and 66% 5-year survival, respectively. Muscle invasion, Stensen's duct involvement, and extracapsular spread of involved lymph nodes were all associated with decreased survival (p < .05). Surgical salvage for patients with locoregional recurrence after radiation therapy was rarely successful. Conclusions. SCC of the buccal mucosa is a highly aggressive form of oral cavity cancer, with a tendency to recur locoregionally. Patients with buccal mucosa SCC have a worse stage-for-stage survival rate than do patients with other oral cavity sites. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 25: 267,273, 2003 [source]


Sentinel node biopsy in oral cavity cancer: Correlation with PET scan and immunohistochemistry

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 1 2003
Francisco J. Civantos MD
Abstract Background. Lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel node biopsy (LS/SNB) is a minimally invasive technique that samples first-echelon lymph nodes to predict the need for more extensive neck dissection. Methods. We evaluated this technique in 18 oral cavity cancers, stages T1,T3, N0. Patients underwent CT and positron emission tomography (PET) of the neck, followed by LS/SNB, frozen section, immediate selective neck dissection, definitive histology, and immunoperoxidase staining for cytokeratin. Histopathology of the sentinel node was correlated with that of the neck specimen. Results. There were 10 true positives: 6 identified on frozen section; 2 on permanent histology; and 2 only on immunoperoxidase staining. In six, the sentinel node was the only positive node. There were seven true negatives and one false negative. Conclusions. Gross tumor replacement of lymph node architecture may obstruct and redirect lymphatic flow. Overall LS/SNB holds promise for oral cancer. 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 25: 000,000, 2003 [source]


Metastatic cancer to the floor of mouth: the lingual lymph nodes,,

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 4 2002
Jay M. Dutton MD
Abstract Background The upper level of a cervical lymphadenectomy is anatomically defined at its anterior extent by the lower border of the mandible and, in surgical practice, by the lingual nerve. A neck dissection completed below this level is generally considered adequate for removal of lymph nodes at risk for metastases from oral cavity cancer. Traditional discontinuous neck dissections do not provide for removal of floor of mouth tissue along with the primary and neck specimens. Methods A case report presenting biopsies from a T2N2bM0 squamous cell carcinoma of the mobile tongue and adjacent floor of the mouth in a 73-year-old man. Results Deep biopsy of a ventral tongue and floor of mouth squamous cell carcinoma revealed occult metastatic cancer to lymph nodes located in the superficial floor of mouth associated with the sublingual gland above the lingual nerve. This report identifies floor of mouth lymph nodes that can be involved with cancer and missed through the standard practice of discontinuous neck dissection.Conclusions. This finding offers evidence that, in certain cases, a traditional discontinuous neck dissection may not address all lymph nodes at risk in the treatment of oral cavity cancer. Further investigation into lymph node distribution within the oral cavity is warranted to reappraise the upper limits of cervical lymphadenectomy. 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 24: 401,405, 2002; DOI 10.1002/hed.10026 [source]


Cancer survival in Germany and the United States at the beginning of the 21st century: An up-to-date comparison by period analysis

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Issue 2 2007
Adam Gondos
Abstract Transatlantic cancer survival comparisons are scarce and involve mostly aggregate European data from the late 1980s. We compare the levels of cancer patient survival achieved in Germany and the United States (US) by the beginning of the 21st century, using data from the Cancer Registry of Saarland/Germany and the SEER Program of the US. Age-adjusted 5- and 10-year relative survival for 23 common forms of cancer derived by period analysis for the 2000,2002 period were calculated, with additional detailed age- and stage-specific analyses for cancers with the highest incidence. Among the 23 cancer sites, 5 (10) year relative survival was significantly higher for 1 (2) and 8 (5) cancers in Germany and the US, respectively. In Germany, survival was significantly higher for patients with stomach cancer, whereas survival was higher in the US for patients with breast, cervical, prostate, colorectal and oral cavity cancer. Among the most common cancers, age-specific survival differences were particularly pronounced for older patients with breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. Survival advantages of breast cancer patients in the US were mainly due to more favorable stage distributions. This comprehensive survival comparison between Germany and the US suggests that although survival was similar for the majority of the compared cancer sites, long-term prognosis of patients continues to be better in the US for many of the most common forms of cancer. Among these, differences between patients with breast and prostate cancer are probably due to more intensive screening activities. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


TNF-, Drives Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in Squamous Oral Carcinogenesis,

THE LARYNGOSCOPE, Issue 8 2008
Laurie Hohberger MD
Abstract Objectives/Hypothesis: It is well known that invasion is a seminal event in the progression of oral and other head and neck carcinoma sites. We have previously demonstrated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-, and its dependent cytokines are upregulated in saliva during oral carcinogenesis. TNF-dependent events stimulate nuclear factor (NF)-,B and many NF-,B-dependent genes are associated with cancer progression. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we examined NF-,B stimulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in a precancerous keratinocyte cell line that models leukoplakia (Rhek cells). We stimulated Rhek cells with both TNF-, and phorbol myristate acetate, known stimulants of NF-,B. We then assayed MMP-9 transcription and secretion by luciferase reporter genes, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and fluorometric enzyme-linked immunosorbent serologic assay. Results: We discovered that the MMP-9 promoter was significantly stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate and TNF-, on luciferase reporter gene assays. Further, we uncovered that functional MMP-9 promoter activation was accompanied by significant increases in MMP-9 gene expression, as judged by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Functional activation of the MMP-9 protein was stimulated by TNF-, and PMA on a fluorescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent serologic assay. Finally, we searched our salivary proteomic database for increases in MMP-9 and discovered it was the third most significant protein in salivas of oral cavity cancer patients over normal controls. Conclusions: We conclude the milieu cytokine, TNF-,, has the capacity to provide stimulation of events related to early invasion of oral cavity cancer, as judged by its ability to stimulate MMP-9. [source]


Osteoradionecrosis with Combined Mandibulotomy and Marginal Mandibulectomy

THE LARYNGOSCOPE, Issue 11 2005
Chih-Chun Wang MD
Abstract Introduction: To evaluate the outcome of simultaneous anterior mandibulotomy and marginal mandibulectomy for patients with oral cavity cancer. Material and Methods: The medical charts of seven patients who underwent simultaneous anterior mandibulotomy and marginal mandibulectomy for oral cavity cancer between July 1994 and June 2004 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan were retrospectively reviewed. These seven patients had no prior radiation therapy nor clinical or radiographic evidence of mandible bone invasion. Results: Seven patients, between 34 to 62 years of age, were followed up in the clinics from 4.5 to 39 months with an average of 19.4 months. Five (71%) patients developed mandible osteoradionecrosis. Among them, two patients underwent radical sequestrectomy followed by reconstruction with a free fibular osteoseptocutaneous flap or soft tissue flap, and the other three patients either received removal of the mandible fixation miniplate, limited sequestrectomy of the mandible, or conservative antibiotic treatment individually. Conclusions: Simultaneous anterior mandibulotomy and marginal mandibulectomy results in a high morbidity rate of avascular necrosis of the mandible and therefore should be avoided. To avoid a disastrous complication, segmental mandibulectomy and a composite free fibular osteoseptocutaneous flap reconstruction would be a preferred surgical alternative. [source]


Prognostic factors in the surgical treatment of patients with oral carcinoma

ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 1-2 2009
Rajan S. Patel
Abstract The aim of the study was to analyse the clinical outcome of patients treated surgically for oral carcinoma. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken of 356 patients with oral cavity cancer whose clinicopathological information had been collected prospectively onto a dedicated head and neck database. Disease recurrence and survival were assessed. Neck metastases occurred in 42% of patients. Tumour thickness (both 2 and 5 mm) predicted the presence of nodal metastases. Both pathological T stage (P < 0.001) and tumour thickness cut-off of 5 mm (P = 0.03) were independent predictors of disease-specific survival. With a median follow up of 41 months, overall survival at 5 years was 59% and disease-specific survival was 73%. Patients with thick tumours have a high risk of nodal metastases and this supports the liberal use of elective selective neck dissection in patients with clinically negative necks. [source]