Opinion

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Opinion

  • audit opinion
  • author opinion
  • clinical opinion
  • common opinion
  • consensus opinion
  • current opinion
  • different opinion
  • doctor opinion
  • expert opinion
  • general opinion
  • majority opinion
  • negative opinion
  • own opinion
  • patient opinion
  • personal opinion
  • policy opinion
  • political opinion
  • positive opinion
  • professional opinion
  • public opinion
  • second opinion
  • shaping public opinion
  • strong opinion
  • student opinion
  • subjective opinion

  • Terms modified by Opinion

  • opinion change
  • opinion data
  • opinion formation
  • opinion leader
  • opinion leadership
  • opinion piece
  • opinion poll
  • opinion shopping
  • opinion survey

  • Selected Abstracts


    CONGRESSIONAL PARTISANSHIP, BIPARTISANSHIP AND PUBLIC OPINION: AN EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS

    POLITICS & POLICY, Issue 1 2001
    Jonathan Morris
    There has been extensive research concerning Congress and how partisan attachments and attitudes affect views toward it. In addition, a burgeoning area of research has developed concerning how media influences a person's attitudes and beliefs. In our study we test three hypotheses: viewing partisan House rhetoric will increase partisanship, negative attitudes toward Congress, and negative attitudes toward the federal government as a whole. We test these hypotheses with an experimental design in which we manipulate the independent variable at two levels: viewing partisan speeches and viewing bipartisan speeches. We find that direct exposure to congressional partisan rhetoric leads to lower levels of support and increased partisan polarization. Surprisingly, we also find that exposure to bipartisan floor rhetoric, while decreasing party polarization fails to generate increased levels of support for Congress or the government as whole. [source]


    OPINION: Immunologic Abnormality of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 4 2010
    Hu Yayi
    Citation Yayi H, Danqing W, Shuyun L, Jicheng L. Immunologic Abnormality of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy. Am J Reprod Immunol 2010; 63: 267,273 Problem, Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy risk because of the possibility of pre-term delivery and sudden intrauterine fetal death. Its pathogenesis is still under discussion. Method of study, The analysis of the recent findings on the complex immunologic events that occur in ICP were performed. Results, In ICP, an increase of type 1 cytokine (TNF-,, IFN-,) associated with a decrease of type 2 cytokine (IL-4). The decreased production of the suppressor cytokine TGF-,2 may increase the type 1 cytokine. Fas appeared to be increased and FasL appeared to be decreased in syncytiotrophoblasts of ICP. The human leukocyte antigen gene (HLA-G, E) in extravillous trophoblasts of ICP were significantly decreased. Conclusion, Th1/Th2 cytokine balance and HLA play important roles in the tolerance and maintenance of pregnancy. ICP may be resulting from breach of the maternal fetal immune tolerance during pregnancy. [source]


    OPINION: Some Severe Maternal Diseases Might be Caused by Fetal-Versus-Maternal Disease (FVMD)

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 3 2010
    Lei Yan
    Citation Yan L, Zuo C, Wei D, Zhao X. Some severe maternal diseases might be caused by fetal-versus-maternal disease (FVMD). Am J Reprod Immunol 2010; 63: 189,192 Pregnancy-related disease is a common challenging clinical problem. From our review and clinical experience, we hypothesize that many severe pregnancy-related complications might be caused by a fetal-versus-maternal disease (FVMD), based on the fact that maternal disease is related to immunity and that fetal cells are present in maternal blood. Fetus is a semi-antigen and can be considered as a tumor or graft. The pathophysiology of FVMD must be complex. We speculate it to be a three-step process: impaired maternal immunological function, fetal T-cell activation and injury of target organs. More experiments and research will be needed to prove our hypothesis. [source]


    OPINION: Response to Gerard Chaouat: Primum Non Nocera,

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 6 2009
    Edward E. Winger
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    CURRENT OPINION AMONGST RADIOLOGISTS AND UROLOGISTS IN THE UK ON PERCUTANEOUS NEPHROSTOMY AND URETERIC STENT INSERTION FOR ACUTE RENAL OBSTRUCTION: RESULTS OF A POSTAL SURVEY

    BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 6 2007
    Deen P Sharma
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    John F. Kennedy, USIA, and World Public Opinion

    DIPLOMATIC HISTORY, Issue 1 2001
    Mark Haefele
    First page of article [source]


    Opinion-based group membership as a predictor of commitment to political action

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2007
    Ana-Maria Bliuc
    Research on group identification has shown it to be a surprisingly weak predictor of intentions to take large-scale social action. The weak links may exist because researchers have not always examined identification with the type of group that is most relevant for predicting action. Our focus in two studies (one in Romania and one in Australia, both Ns,=,101) was on opinion-based groups (i.e. groups formed around shared opinions). We found that social identification with opinion-based groups was an excellent predictor of political behavioural intentions, particularly when items measuring identity certainty were included. The results provide clear evidence of the role of social identity constructs for predicting commitment to social action and complement analyses of politicised collective identity and crowd behaviour. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Opinion: Demystifying Native American genetic opposition to research

    EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 3 2006
    Kari Britt Schroeder
    First page of article [source]


    Public Opinion as a Constraint against War: Democracies' Responses to Operation Iraqi Freedom

    FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS, Issue 2 2006
    STEVE CHAN
    A central logic of the democratic peace theory claims that public opinion acts as a powerful restraint against war. Democratic officials, unlike their autocratic counterparts, are wary of going to war because they expect to pay an electoral penalty for fighting even successful wars. Several democracies, however, recently joined Operation Iraqi Freedom despite substantial and even overwhelming domestic opposition. We argue that electoral institutions can heighten or lessen the impact of public opinion on democratic officials' concerns for their reelection prospects, thus pointing to an important dimension of variation that has been overlooked in the democratic peace literature. However, contrary to conventional attributions of a greater incentive motivating the parties and candidates in predominantly two-party systems with majority/plurality decision rules to respond to national public opinion, we suggest mitigating factors that tend to reduce such responsiveness. Conversely, we point out that multiparty competition in proportional representation systems can reduce electoral disproportionality without sacrificing responsiveness to public opinion. The pertinent electoral institutions therefore present varying opportunities (or, conversely, constraints) for democratic officials to override their constituents' sentiments when they are so inclined. [source]


    Opposition to the European Union in the UK: The Dilemma of Public Opinion and Party Management

    GOVERNMENT AND OPPOSITION, Issue 2 2002
    Simon Usherwood
    First page of article [source]


    Expert Opinion: Rescue Me: Rescue Medication for Migraine

    HEADACHE, Issue 2 2010
    Chad Whyte MD
    (Headache 2010;50:307-313) [source]


    Expert Opinion: Retinal Migraine: Migraine Associated With Monocular Visual Symptoms (CME)

    HEADACHE, Issue 1 2008
    Randolph W. Evans MD
    First page of article [source]


    Testing the Water: Practitioner Opinion of a Regional Credit Scheme (NICATS)

    HIGHER EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2001
    Anthony Cook
    The Northern Ireland Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme encompasses all levels from introductory to doctoral. It was designed to facilitate the progression of learners through both the Further and Higher Education structures in Northern Ireland and has provided the model for developments elsewhere. Part of its development included a consultative procedure that involved curriculum specialists liaising with a wide range of practitioners to identify strengths and problematic areas within the scheme. The consultation found that, at the time (1998), practitioner awareness of CATS schemes was generally poor. Most teachers of lower level courses felt that the scheme in general would add value to their courses since it would place them within a hierarchical framework and indicate to their students clear forward progression routes. Many teachers of multilevel courses (in particular degrees) felt that attempting to define levels within a course would result in a loss of teacher autonomy and a reduction in the flexibility with which courses could be offered. Many interviewees stressed the sequential nature of their subject's structure and the perception that this caused problems for student progression through a system of levels based on generic descriptors. It is concluded that although there was broad practitioner support for NICATS, many of its potential benefits will only be realized after substantial staff development. When implemented, it should result not only in a more transparent description of courses but also substantial development in the delivery of curricula and the assessment of student learning. [source]


    Radical Opinion in an Age of Reform: Thomas Perronet Thompson and the Westminster Review

    HISTORY, Issue 281 2001
    Michael J. Turner
    Historians have long been interested in the growth of the nineteenth-century political press, and many commentators recognize the instrumentality of newspapers, pamphlets, prints and publications of all kinds in the development of radical opinion and popular participation in politics. This article is offered as a contribution to continuing debates about the links between radicalism and the press. Its purpose is to examine the establishment and early history of the Westminster Review, the leading radical periodical of the early nineteenth century. Special attention will be paid to the role of Thomas Perronet Thompson (1783-1869), who was associated with the review for several years as owner, editor and contributor. This article will demonstrate the importance of Thompson's involvement with the Westminster Review with reference to its politics, reputation, influence, management and status. Personal relationships which had a bearing on the review's early history - particularly those between Thompson, Jeremy Bentham, John Bowring and the Mills - will be examined, and there will also be discussion of editorial processes, journalistic standards, business rivalry, the nature of the Westminster Review's content, and its conflict with the Whig Edinburgh Review. [source]


    Systematic review on embracing cultural diversity for developing and sustaining a healthy work environment in healthcare

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EVIDENCE BASED HEALTHCARE, Issue 1 2007
    Alan Pearson RN, FRCN, FRCNA
    Abstract Objectives, The objective of this review was to evaluate evidence on the structures and processes that support development of effective culturally competent practices and a healthy work environment. Culturally competent practices are a congruent set of workforce behaviours, management practices and institutional policies within a practice setting resulting in an organisational environment that is inclusive of cultural and other forms of diversity. Inclusion criteria, This review included quantitative and qualitative evidence, with a particular emphasis on identifying systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials. For quantitative evidence, other controlled, and descriptive designs were also included. For qualitative evidence, all methodologies were considered. Participants were staff, patients, and systems or policies that were involved or affected by concepts of cultural competence in the nursing workforce in a healthcare environment. Types of interventions included any strategy that had a cultural competence component, which influenced the work environment, and/or patient and nursing staff in the environment. The types of outcomes of interest to this review included nursing staff outcomes, patient outcomes, organisational outcomes and systems level outcomes. Search strategy, The search sought both published and unpublished literature written in the English language. A comprehensive three-step search strategy was used, first to identify appropriate key words, second to combine all optimal key words into a comprehensive search strategy for each database and finally to review the reference lists of all included reviews and research reports. The databases searched were CINAHL, Medline, Current Contents, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, The Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, Embase, Sociological Abstracts, Econ lit, ABI/Inform, ERIC and PubMed. The search for unpublished literature used Dissertation Abstracts International. Methodological quality, Methodological quality was independently established by two reviewers, using standardised techniques from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (SUMARI) package. Discussion with a third reviewer was initiated where a low level of agreement was identified for a particular paper. Following inclusion, data extraction was conducted using standardised data extraction tools from the JBI SUMARI suite for quantitative and qualitative research. Data synthesis was performed using the JBI Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument and JBI Narrative, Opinion and Text Assessment and Review Instrument software to aggregate findings by identifying commonalities across texts. Quantitative data were presented in narrative summary, as statistical pooling was not appropriate with the included studies. Results, Of the 659 identified papers, 45 were selected for full paper retrieval, and 19 were considered to meet the inclusion criteria for this review. The results identified a number of processes that would contribute to the development of a culturally competent workforce. Appropriate and competent linguistic services, and intercultural staff training and education, were identified as key findings in this review. Conclusions, The review recommends that health provider agencies establish links with organisations that can address needs of culturally diverse groups of patients, include cultural competence in decision support systems and staff education as well as embed them in patient brochures and educational materials. The review also concluded that staff in-service programs consider the skills needed to foster a culturally competent workforce, and recruitment strategies that also explicitly address this need. [source]


    Foreign Policy Analysis and Globalization: Public Opinion, World Opinion, and the Individual by Foyle,

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 2 2003
    Jean A. Garrison
    First page of article [source]


    Foreign Policy Analysis and Globalization: Public Opinion, World Opinion, and the Individual

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 2 2003
    Douglas Foyle
    First page of article [source]


    Divergence of Opinion and Post-Acquisition Performance

    JOURNAL OF BUSINESS FINANCE & ACCOUNTING, Issue 3-4 2007
    George Alexandridis
    Abstract:, We examine the relation between divergence of opinion about the value of the acquiring firm in the pre-acquisition announcement period and post-acquisition stock returns. We find that acquirers subject to high opinion dispersion earn lower future returns than acquirers subject to low dispersion. It appears that, on average, only acquirers in the high divergence of opinion subset experience significant negative post-event abnormal returns. In the spirit of Miller (1977), such evidence implies that high pre-event investor disagreement leads to systematic overpricing of acquirers that manifests itself through long-run underperformance of their stock. The documented misvaluation persists irrespective of the opinion divergence proxy and performance evaluation method used and after controlling for several common deal and acquirer characteristics. [source]


    Discussion of Divergence of Opinion and Post Acquisition Performance

    JOURNAL OF BUSINESS FINANCE & ACCOUNTING, Issue 3-4 2007
    Gilad Livne
    First page of article [source]


    Building Publics, Shaping Public Opinion: Interanimating Registers in Malagasy Kabary Oratory and Political Cartooning

    JOURNAL OF LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 2 2008
    Jennifer L. Jackson
    This article discusses socially productive aspects of register shifts in political oratory (kabary politika) and political cartoons of the urban capital province of Madagascar, Imerina. In their daily mediated interactions, politicians and cartoonists interanimate varying registers associated with different social fields, effectively framing and navigating particular publics for particular interests. In this context, the article will explore the semiotic process in which registers drawn from different speech contexts,the proverbs of kabary, Christian sermons, and Western political and international development rhetoric,discursively circulate to hearken toward or contest imaginaries of community belonging and solidarity undergirding these publics, the agency of participant roles they presuppose, and the public opinion they entail.,[Madagascar, oratory, political cartoons, linguistic variation, publics] [source]


    American Business and Political Power: Public Opinion, Elections and Democracy; Stuck in Neutral: Business and the Politics of Human Capital investment; Does Business Learn?

    JOURNAL OF POLICY ANALYSIS AND MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2001
    Graham K. Wilson
    [source]


    Homelessness in Europe and the United States: A Comparison of Prevalence and Public Opinion

    JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, Issue 3 2007
    Paul A. Toro
    Random samples of 250,435 adults were interviewed by telephone in five different nations (N= 1,546): Belgium, Germany, Italy, the UK, and the United States. The interview included questions on respondent attitudes, knowledge, and opinions regarding homelessness; respondents' own personal experiences with homelessness and homeless people; and demographic characteristics of the respondents. The highest rates for lifetime literal homelessness were found in the UK (7.7%) and United States (6.2%), with the lowest rate in Germany (2.4%), and intermediate rates in Italy (4.0%) and Belgium (3.4%). Less compassionate attitudes toward the homeless were also found on many dimensions in the United States and the UK. Possible explanations of these findings, drawn from various theoretical perspectives, and policy implications are provided. [source]


    Comparison of Three Pebble Count Protocols (EMAP, PIBO, and SFT) in Two Mountain Gravel-Bed Streams,

    JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, Issue 5 2009
    Kristin Bunte
    Abstract:, Although the term "pebble count" is in widespread use, there is no standardized methodology used for the field application of this procedure. Each pebble count analysis is the product of several methodological choices, any of which are capable of influencing the final result. Because there are virtually countless variations on pebble count protocols, the question of how their results differ when applied to the same study reach is becoming increasingly important. This study compared three pebble count protocols: the reach-averaged Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) protocol named after the EMAP developed by the Environmental Protection Agency, the habitat-unit specific U.S. Forest Service's PACFISH/INFISH Biological Opinion (PIBO) Effectiveness Monitoring Program protocol, and a data-intensive method developed by the authors named Sampling Frame and Template (SFT). When applied to the same study reaches, particle-size distributions varied among the three pebble count protocols because of differences in sample locations within a stream reach and along a transect, in particle selection, and particle-size determination. The EMAP protocol yielded considerably finer, and the PIBO protocol considerably coarser distributions than the SFT protocol in the pool-riffle study streams, suggesting that the data cannot be used interchangeably. Approximately half of the difference was due to sampling at different areas within the study reach (i.e., wetted width, riffles, and bankfull width) and at different locations within a transect. The other half was attributed to using different methods for particle selection from the bed, particle-size determination, and the use of wide, nonstandard size classes. Most of the differences in sampling outcomes could be eliminated by using simple field tools, by collecting a larger sample size, and by systematically sampling the entire bankfull channel and all geomorphic units within the reach. [source]


    Expert Opinion on Vaccination of Travelers Against Japanese Encephalitis

    JOURNAL OF TRAVEL MEDICINE, Issue 3 2009
    Gerd D. Burchard MD
    First page of article [source]


    In My Opinion,Now is the Time

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 3 2008
    Judge Thomas Zampino
    [source]


    In My Opinion , Respecting Parent and Child Representation in the Legal Profession

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 2 2006
    JUDGE CHRIS MELONAKIS
    First page of article [source]


    Public Opinion of Teen, Classroom, and Formal Court Styles

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 2 2003
    MARK G. HARMON B.A.
    ABSTRACT The present research examined the views of a community sample regarding teen court, classroom court, and formal/traditional court. Participants read vignettes of teen offenders who had committed crimes of high or low severity and were given relatively severe or mild sentences through one of the three courts. Results revealed stronger support for teen court than the other courts, a general preference for harsh sentences, and a preference for match between crime and punishment. The results of this study indicate that teen courts are seen as providing an appropriate means to sentence juvenile offenders and are likely to receive public support for their continued operation. [source]


    Public Opinion and the Rehnquist Court.

    LAW & SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
    By Thomas R. Marshall
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Opinion #3: Timothy F. Murphy, PhD

    PAIN MEDICINE, Issue 3 2003
    TIMOTHY F. MURPHY PhD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Pain and the Pharmacist: Opinion #1

    PAIN MEDICINE, Issue 2 2003
    DAVID E. Joranson MSSW
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]