One-lung Ventilation (one-lung + ventilation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


One-lung ventilation of a preterm newborn during esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula repair

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 3 2002
E. Tercan
In this paper, we assessed the anesthesia management of a male, a 34-week gestation age newborn, weighing 1500 g, who has esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula localized just above the carina. Endotracheal intubation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation caused air leakage through the fistula into the stomach, causing abdominal distention. One-lung ventilation by left main bronchus intubation eliminated this problem. [source]


Bilateral pulmonary edema after endoscopic sympathectomy in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 1 2001
C.-J. Lan
Transaxillary endoscopic sympathectomy of thoracic ganglia (T2,T3) has recently gained wider acceptance as the treatment of choice for palmar hyperhidrosis. It requires one-lung ventilation to facilitate the surgery. One-lung ventilation, however, is not without complications, among which acute pulmonary edema has been reported. In this case report, we present a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis complicated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, who received bilateral endoscopic sympathectomy under alternate one-lung anesthesia, and developed acute pulmonary edema immediately after recruitment of the successive collapsed lung. The effects of hypoxemia, G-6-PD deficiency and sympathectomy might all add to the development of acute pulmonary edema secondary to reexpansion of each individual lung after alternate one-lung ventilation. The possibilities of the inferred causes are herein discussed. [source]


How do COPD and healthy-lung patients tolerate the reduced volume ventilation strategy during OLV ventilation.

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 9 2010
P. MICHELET
Background: Although a strategy of tidal volume (Vt) reduction during the one-lung ventilation (OLV) period is advised in thoracic surgery, the influence of the pre-operative respiratory status on the tolerance of this strategy remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the pulmonary function between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and healthy-lung patients during the operative and the post-operative period. Methods: Forty-eight patients undergoing a planned lobectomy for cancer and presenting either a healthy lung function (n=24) or a moderate COPD stage (n=24) were ventilated without external positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and received 9 ml/kg Vt during the two-lung ventilation (TLV) period, secondary reduced to 6 ml/kg during the OLV period. Lung function was assessed by peroperative gas exchange, venous admixture, respiratory mechanical parameters and post-operative spirometric measurements. Results: Although the PaO2 was superior in the healthy-lung group during the TLV, once the OLV was established, no difference was observed between the two groups. Moreover, the PaO2/FiO2 was proportionally more impaired in the healthy-lung group compared with the COPD group (50 ą 13 vs. 72 ą 19% of the baseline values after exclusion and 32 ą 15 vs. 51 ą 25% after the thoracotomy, P<0.05 for each) as well as the venous admixture. In the post-operative period, a higher decrease was observed in the healthy-lung group for the forced vital capacity and the forced expiratory volume. Conclusions: Reducing Vt to 6 ml/kg without the adjunction of external PEEP during OLV is associated with better preservation of lung function in the case of moderate COPD than in the case of healthy-lung status. [source]


Effect of epidural dexmedetomidine on intraoperative awareness and post-operative pain after one-lung ventilation

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 6 2010
M. ELHAKIM
Background: During combined general and regional anaesthesia, it is difficult to use autonomic signs to assess whether wakefulness is suppressed adequately. We compared the effects of a dexmedetomidine,bupivacaine mixture with plain bupivacaine for thoracic epidural anaesthesia on intraoperative awareness and analgesic benefits, when combined with superficial isoflurane anaesthesia (<0.05 maximum alveolar concentration) in patients undergoing thoracic surgery with one-lung ventilation (OLV). Methods: Fifty adult male patients were randomly assigned to receive either epidural dexmedetomidine 1 ,g/kg with bupivacaine 0.5% (group D) or bupivacaine 0.5% alone (group B) after induction of general anaesthesia. Gasometric, haemodynamic and bispectral index values were recorded. Post-operative verbal rating score for pain and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation scale were determined by a blinded observer. Results: Dexmedetomidine reduced the use of supplementary fentanyl during surgery. Patients in group B consumed more analgesics and had higher pain scores after operation than patients of group D. The level of sedation was similar between the two groups in the ICU. Two patients (8%) in group B reported possible intraoperative awareness. There was a limited decrease in PaO2 at OLV in group D compared with group B (P<0.05). Conclusion: In thoracic surgery with OLV, the use of epidural dexmedetomidine decreases the anaesthetic requirements significantly, prevents awareness during anaesthesia and improves intraoperative oxygenation and post-operative analgesia. [source]


Gravity is an important determinant of oxygenation during one-lung ventilation

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 6 2010
L. L. SZEGEDI
Background: The role of gravity in the redistribution of pulmonary blood flow during one-lung ventilation (OLV) has been questioned recently. To address this controversial but clinically important issue, we used an experimental approach that allowed us to differentiate the effects of gravity from the effects of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) on arterial oxygenation during OLV in patients scheduled for thoracic surgery. Methods: Forty patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease scheduled for right lung tumour resection were randomized to undergo dependent (left) one-lung ventilation (D-OLV; n=20) or non-dependent (right) one-lung ventilation (ND-OLV; n=20) in the supine and left lateral positions. Partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) was measured as a surrogate for ventilation/perfusion matching. Patients were studied before surgery under closed chest conditions. Results: When compared with bilateral lung ventilation, both D-OLV and ND-OLV caused a significant and equal decrease in PaO2 in the supine position. However, D-OLV in the lateral position was associated with a higher PaO2 as compared with the supine position [274.2 (77.6) vs. 181.9 (68.3) mmHg, P<0.01, analysis of variance (ANOVA)]. In contrast, in patients undergoing ND-OLV, PaO2 was always lower in the lateral as compared with the supine position [105.3 (63.2) vs. 187 (63.1) mmHg, P<0.01, ANOVA]. Conclusion: The relative position of the ventilated vs. the non-ventilated lung markedly affects arterial oxygenation during OLV. These data suggest that gravity affects ventilation,perfusion matching independent of HPV. [source]


Bronchial blocker compared to double-lumen tube for one-lung ventilation during thoracoscopy

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 2 2001
C. Bauer
Background: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) requires one-lung ventilation with a properly collapsed lung. This study compared the Broncho-Cath double-lumen endotracheal tube with the Wiruthan bronchial blocker to determine the advantages of one device over the other during anaesthesia with one-lung ventilation for thoracoscopy. Methods: Thirty-five patients undergoing VATS were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Sixteen patients received a left-sided double-lumen tube (DLT) and nineteen a Wiruthan bronchial blocker (BB). The BB group was subdivided in two: BB in the right mainstem bronchus (BBR) for right-sided VATS (9 patients), BB in the left mainstem bronchus (BBL) for left-sided VATS (10 patients). The position of the devices was checked using a fibreoptic bronchoscope. The following variables were measured: 1) number of unsuccessful placement attempts; 2) number of malpositions of the devices; 3) time required to place the device in the correct position; 4) number of secondary dislodgements of the devices after turning the patient into the lateral decubitus position. The quality of lung deflation was evaluated by the surgeons who were blinded to the type of tube being used. Results: The number of unsuccessful placement attempts was one in the DLT group (1/16), three in the BBL group (3/10) and none in the BBR group (0/9). The number of malpositions was significantly greater in the BBL group (10/10) compared to the DLT group (2/16) and to the BBR group (1/9) (P<0.001). The time (meanąSD) required to place a BBL was 4.21 miną1.28, significantly longer than the time required to place a DLT (2.26 miną0.55, P<0.0006) or a BBR (2.41 miną0.53, P<0.008). The difference in placement time between DLT and BBR was not significant. The number of secondary dislodgements was one in the DLT group, one in the BBR group and none in the BBL group (NS). The quality of lung deflation was judged excellent or fair in all patients in the DLT and the BBL groups and poor in 44% of the patients in the BBR group. Conclusion: It took significantly longer to place a left BB than a DLT (P<0.0006) or a right BB (P<0.008). The number of initial malpositionings of the left BB was significantly greater than in the other groups (P<0.001). The quality of lung deflation was better in the BBL and in the DLT groups than in the BBR group. We conclude that for routine use during left-sided VATS, the use of a DLT is preferable to a left BB because of its greater ease of placement. For right-sided VATS, DLT and right BB showed the same facility of placement but the DLT provided a better quality of lung deflation. [source]


Bilateral pulmonary edema after endoscopic sympathectomy in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 1 2001
C.-J. Lan
Transaxillary endoscopic sympathectomy of thoracic ganglia (T2,T3) has recently gained wider acceptance as the treatment of choice for palmar hyperhidrosis. It requires one-lung ventilation to facilitate the surgery. One-lung ventilation, however, is not without complications, among which acute pulmonary edema has been reported. In this case report, we present a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis complicated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, who received bilateral endoscopic sympathectomy under alternate one-lung anesthesia, and developed acute pulmonary edema immediately after recruitment of the successive collapsed lung. The effects of hypoxemia, G-6-PD deficiency and sympathectomy might all add to the development of acute pulmonary edema secondary to reexpansion of each individual lung after alternate one-lung ventilation. The possibilities of the inferred causes are herein discussed. [source]


Right heart function during one-lung ventilation , observations using transoesophageal echocardiography

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 12 2009
J. N. Wilkinson
No abstract is available for this article. [source]