Old Myocardial Infarction (old + myocardial_infarction)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Ventricular Flutter Induced During Electrophysiologic Studies in Patients with Old Myocardial Infarction:

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 9 2003
Clinical, Electrophysiologic Predictors, Prognostic Significance
Introduction: Induction of ventricular flutter during electrophysiologic (EP) studies (similar to that of ventricular fibrillation [VF]) often is viewed as a nonspecific response with limited prognostic significance. However, data supporting this dogma originate from patients without previously documented ventricular tachyarrhythmias. We examined the significance of ventricular flutter in patients with and without spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results: We conducted a cohort study of all patients with myocardial infarction (MI) undergoing EP studies at our institution. Of 344 consecutive patients, 181 had previously documented spontaneous sustained ventricular arrhythmias, 61 had suspected ventricular arrhythmias, and 102 had neither. Ventricular flutter was induced in 65 (19%) of the patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction was highest among patients with inducible VF (35 13), lowest for patients with inducible sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (SMVT; 27 9), and intermediate for patients with inducible ventricular flutter (30 10). Similarly, the coupling intervals needed to induce the arrhythmia were shortest for VF (200 28 msec), intermediate for ventricular flutter (209 27 msec), and longest for SMVT (230 35 msec). During 5 8 years of follow-up, the risk for ventricular tachycardia/VF was high for patients with SMVT and ventricular flutter and low for patients with inducible VF and noninducible patients (46%, 34%, 17%, and 14%, P < 0.005). Conclusion: Patients with inducible ventricular flutter appear to be "intermediate" between patients with inducible VF and patients with SMVT in terms of clinical and electrophysiologic correlates. However, the prognostic value of inducible ventricular flutter is comparable to that of SMVT. (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. 14, pp. 913-919, September 2003) [source]


Risk of Heart Failure Due to a Combination of Mild Mitral Regurgitation and Impaired Distensibility of the Left Ventricle in Patients with Old Myocardial Infarction

CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY, Issue 12 2008
Shu Inami MD
Abstract Background Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is a serious complication after myocardial infarction, and the incidence of heart failure (HF) increases as the severity of MR increases. However, little is known about the relationship between mild MR and HF in the patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) and a normal ejection fraction (EF). Hypothesis We hypothesized that a combination of mild MR and impaired distensibility of the left ventricle may increase the risk of diastolic HF in the patients with OMI and a normal EF. Methods The relationship between HF and mild MR was retrospectively investigated in 62 patients with OMI and EF of > 50% on echocardiography. Results Of the 62 patients, 47 (76%) did not have HF and 15 (24%) had HF. There was a significant difference in the incidence of mild MR between the patients with and without HF (p < 0.0001): of the 47 patients without HF, mild MR was detected in 19, but all 15 patients with HF had mild MR. However, there were no significant differences in age, gender, infarct sites, diseased coronary vessels, peak CK level, and observation period between the 2 groups. An increased E-wave and the ratio of the E-wave to the A-wave (E/A), a reduction of the E-wave deceleration time, and an increased brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level were significantly noted in HF patients with mild MR compared with patients without HF. Conclusions Even a mild MR may cause diastolic HF in patients with impaired distensibility of the left ventricle due to ischemic heart disease. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Transvenous Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in a Patient with Tricuspid Mechanical Prosthesis

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 3 2007
MAURO BIFFI M.D.
Background. A 64-year-old woman was referred to our center because of poorly tolerated ventricular tachycardia (VT) at 210 bpm due to an old myocardial infarction. The patient had been operated on at age of 20 for mitral valve commissurolysis, at age of 49 for ductal carcinoma, at age of 56 for mitral valve replacement, and at age of 61 for tricuspid valve replacement. Left ventricular EF was 31%. The patient was in permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) since the age of 53. She had undergone three cardiac surgery procedures, ending with two prosthetic mechanical valves. The cardiac surgery team advised against an epicardial ICD implantation. Results. We achieved a fully transvenous implant, with a screw-in defibrillation coil in the low right atrium and a bipolar pacing/sensing lead in a posterolateral branch of the coronary sinus. Pacing/sensing parameters were reliable, and effective defibrillation occurred at 20 J by a stepdown protocol. During 16-month follow-up, three VT episodes at 210 bpm were terminated by antitachycardia pacing (ATP) therapy. Left ventricular pacing/sensing was stable at long term. Conclusion. Thanks to technologic improvements, transvenous ICD implantation is feasible and safe in patients with a tricuspid mechanical prosthesis. [source]


Exercise- or dipyridamole-loaded QGS is useful to evaluate myocardial ischemia and viability in the patients with a history of Kawasaki disease

PEDIATRICS INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2005
Yuichi Ishikawa
AbstractBackground:,Evaluation of myocardial ischemia and viability is very important for the management of patients with a history of Kawasaki disease (KD). 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scintigraphy combined with quantitative gated single photon computed emission tomography (QGS) gives us information, not only about perfusion, but also the percentage change in left ventricular wall thickness (%WT) and relative changes in left ventricular wall motion (LVM). Methods:,The subjects were 27 patients with a history of KD followed as outpatients at the National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan. Exercise-loaded QGS was performed on 21 patients, and dipyridamole- loaded QGS was performed in six patients younger than 7 years old. Results:,Perfusion defects (PD) were observed in 12 patients. Of the 12 patients, four with old myocardial infarction (OMI) had decreased %WT. All patients with OMI showed a decrease in %WT in the areas where PD was seen on the image. The other eight patients without OMI showed no decrease in %WT. In non-infarcted cases, the %WT was normal in the PD-positive area. Conclusions:,It is possible to evaluate myocardial ischemia and viability in KD patients by comparing PD on the image with %WT determined by QGS using exercise or drug-loaded myocardial scintigraphy alone. [source]


Risk of Heart Failure Due to a Combination of Mild Mitral Regurgitation and Impaired Distensibility of the Left Ventricle in Patients with Old Myocardial Infarction

CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY, Issue 12 2008
Shu Inami MD
Abstract Background Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is a serious complication after myocardial infarction, and the incidence of heart failure (HF) increases as the severity of MR increases. However, little is known about the relationship between mild MR and HF in the patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) and a normal ejection fraction (EF). Hypothesis We hypothesized that a combination of mild MR and impaired distensibility of the left ventricle may increase the risk of diastolic HF in the patients with OMI and a normal EF. Methods The relationship between HF and mild MR was retrospectively investigated in 62 patients with OMI and EF of > 50% on echocardiography. Results Of the 62 patients, 47 (76%) did not have HF and 15 (24%) had HF. There was a significant difference in the incidence of mild MR between the patients with and without HF (p < 0.0001): of the 47 patients without HF, mild MR was detected in 19, but all 15 patients with HF had mild MR. However, there were no significant differences in age, gender, infarct sites, diseased coronary vessels, peak CK level, and observation period between the 2 groups. An increased E-wave and the ratio of the E-wave to the A-wave (E/A), a reduction of the E-wave deceleration time, and an increased brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level were significantly noted in HF patients with mild MR compared with patients without HF. Conclusions Even a mild MR may cause diastolic HF in patients with impaired distensibility of the left ventricle due to ischemic heart disease. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]