Officers

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Officers

  • ambulance officer
  • chief executive officer
  • chief financial officer
  • chief information officer
  • chief nursing officer
  • chief technology officer
  • correctional officer
  • enforcement officer
  • executive officer
  • financial officer
  • health officer
  • house officer
  • information officer
  • law enforcement officer
  • loan officer
  • medical officer
  • military officer
  • nursing officer
  • police officer
  • probation officer
  • senior house officer
  • technology officer


  • Selected Abstracts


    THE COMMODIFICATION OF THE DANISH DEFENCE FORCES AND THE TROUBLED IDENTITIES OF ITS OFFICERS

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2007
    Peter Skærbæk
    The accounting literature has given much attention to the New Public Management and attempts at making the government's performances auditable while influencing the core working of the public sector. This paper contributes to this debate by demonstrating how particular accounting devices participate in the definition of the identities of the officers in the Danish Defence. It shows how the definition of the officers' identities is complex and dynamic and does not necessarily have outcomes of stability and closure. Applying Actor-Network Theory we demonstrate how their identities are caught up in processes of continual or never ending reconfigurations. The major implication is that the occupational identity of the Danish officers is subject to attempts of being defined as ,a manager' in the period 1989-2006. The paper demonstrates how accounting devices participated in defining a hybrid identity of the officers as ,warrior' and ,manager' and that officers in different spaces and times experienced problems with the hybrid identity. [source]


    The administration of union business: the role of the Certification Officer

    INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS JOURNAL, Issue 3 2006
    Graeme Lockwood
    ABSTRACT This commentary reports on the role of the Certification Officer in the regulation of trade union internal affairs. Debate concerning the amount of external supervision of the internal affairs of trade unions has been a recurring theme in labour law for many years. [source]


    An epitaph to CROTUM and CPAUIA

    INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS JOURNAL, Issue 5 2000
    Graeme Lockwood
    This commemtary reviews the operation of the trade union commissioners abolished by the Employment Relations Act 1999, and the initiative to have new powers to the Certification Officer concerning the regulation of internal union affairs. [source]


    Duly Authorized Officers' practices under mental health law in New Zealand: Are nurses meeting the requirements of the law?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2009
    Brian McKenna
    ABSTRACT The Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act (1992) introduced a number of statutory roles that are undertaken by mental health nurses. One of these roles is that of Duly Authorized Officer (DAO). The DAO is responsible for the procedural requirements necessary to facilitate compulsory assessment. Under Section 9(2)(d), the DAO is required to ensure that the purpose of the assessment and the requirements of the notice of assessment are explained to the person in the presence of a member of their family, a caregiver, or other person concerned with the welfare of the person. Three recent High Court decisions under the Habeas Corpus Act 2001 have challenged existing DAO practices in arranging the presence of a third party. This paper presents research, which focuses on unravelling some of the complexities associated with meeting this procedural requirement. It illustrates these complexities through a discussion of the results of an audit of files and three focus groups with mental health nurses who practise as DAO. The paper concludes that national guidelines for practice need to be developed for DAO to assist mental health nurses in meeting this statutory requirement. [source]


    Visions from the Chief Nursing Officer

    JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2003
    Sarah Mullally
    [source]


    Shipboard Maintenance: What Do Surface Warfare Officers Need to Know,and When Do They Need to Know It?

    NAVAL ENGINEERS JOURNAL, Issue 2 2008
    KENNETH R. SYDOW
    As the Navy has moved into the 21st century and the War on Terror has unfolded, the challenges to ship maintenance management have never been greater. These challenges include: a continuing high operating tempo compounded by less predictable schedules and coupled with fewer, shorter scheduled opportunities to conduct maintenance; a fleet of fewer albeit more capable,and therefore more complex,ships; a trend toward smaller, perhaps less stable crews to operate and maintain the ships; and continuing competition for the available budget dollars between operations and maintenance, as well as between current and future readiness concerns. In an era of "operations focused maintenance," what is the role of the Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) in managing their shipboard maintenance? What do they need to know, and when do they need to know it? This paper addresses these questions and related issues and offers, where applicable, some near-term and long-term recommendations for improvement. [source]


    The organizational influence of the Chief Technology Officer

    R & D MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2008
    John W. Medcof
    The proposition that the Chief Technology Officer's (CTO) primary bases for power and influence are in technical expertise and position power is critically analyzed from the perspective of upper echelons research. This fresh perspective suggests that CTOs who aspire to have significant influence in their organizations should also build their power bases on broad knowledge of the firm and its environment, a network of personal relationships inside and outside the firm, ownership position in the firm, and intuitive understanding of the business. The CEO's leadership style can also enhance or curtail the influence of the CTO. Research and managerial implications are drawn. [source]


    Information Modelling as a Paradigm Shift

    ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Issue 2 2009
    Dennis Shelden
    Abstract Building information modelling (BIM) is not just a change in software or skills sets, it requires a paradigm shift. Dennis Shelden, Chief Technology Officer of Gehry Technologies, outlines the more ,fundamental, subtle and profound decisions' on the road to BIM. It is necessary to fully consider not only the impacts both ,upstream' and ,downstream' from the conventional design phase, but also the possible creative restrictions as there is a potential trade-off that comes with the emphasis on collaborative processes. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Preserving the astronomical sky

    ASTRONOMY & GEOPHYSICS, Issue 2 2000
    Article first published online: 24 DEC 200
    Derek McNally was a member of the organizing committee of IAU Symposium 196. Jacqueline Mitton is RAS Press Officer. Derek McNally and Jacqueline Mitton report on an out-of-the-ordinary IAU Symposium, no. 196, held on 12,16 July 1999. [source]


    Colonel Lionel Rose, Chief Veterinary Officer of the Northern Territory 1946,1958

    AUSTRALIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL, Issue 10 2006
    J Whittem
    [source]


    The organizational influence of the Chief Technology Officer

    R & D MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2008
    John W. Medcof
    The proposition that the Chief Technology Officer's (CTO) primary bases for power and influence are in technical expertise and position power is critically analyzed from the perspective of upper echelons research. This fresh perspective suggests that CTOs who aspire to have significant influence in their organizations should also build their power bases on broad knowledge of the firm and its environment, a network of personal relationships inside and outside the firm, ownership position in the firm, and intuitive understanding of the business. The CEO's leadership style can also enhance or curtail the influence of the CTO. Research and managerial implications are drawn. [source]


    Survey of the pre-school child health surveillance programme in Sweden

    ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 2000
    R Kornfält
    A survey of the programme for developmental surveillance in the Child Health Centres (CHCs) in Sweden was performed using a questionnaire administered to the Chief Medical Officers (CMO) of the Child Health Services. The questionnaire asked about methods used for auditory examination, developmental surveillance and identification of disturbances in mother-child interaction. Activities for health promotion concerning breastfeeding, non-smoking and allergy prevention were also queried. Thirty-four CMOs representing 1731 CHCs and 645000 children answered the questionnaire. The reply rate was 81%. Various methods of auditory examination are offered all infants and children in Sweden. The national guidelines for health supervision are followed fairly closely by all. Screening for disturbances in attention, motor development and perception (DAMP) is performed by all but four districts, with various methods, resources and degrees of co-operation with school health services. Support in mother-child interaction is considered very important and new methods to identify and treat disturbances are gradually introduced. Breastfeeding is encouraged; breast milk is the main source of food for 67% of babies at 4 mo of age. Activities to stop or diminish use of tobacco are ongoing everywhere, as are programmes to identify children at risk of developing allergies and for allergy prevention. Thus, the Child Health Services maintain a high standard and are ambitious about introducing new methods and ideas. [source]


    PROBLEM-ORIENTED POLICING IN PRACTICE,

    CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 2 2005
    GARY CORDNER
    Research Summary: Interviews and surveys were used to measure the extent of problem-oriented policing (POP) by individual police officers in the San Diego Police Department. Officers tended to engage in small-scale problem solving with little formal analysis or assessment. Responses generally included enforcement plus one or two more collaborative or nontraditional initiatives. Policy Implications: Despite 15 years of national promotion and a concerted effort at implementation within the San Diego Police Department, POP as practiced by ordinary police officers fell far short of the ideal model. It may be unreasonable to expect every police officer to continuously engage in full-fledged POP. [source]


    Urban Service Partnerships, ,Street-Level Bureaucrats' and Environmental Sanitation in Kumasi and Accra, Ghana: Coping with Organisational Change in the Public Bureaucracy

    DEVELOPMENT POLICY REVIEW, Issue 1 2006
    Richard Crook
    This is an empirical case study of ,street-level' officials in a classic ,regulatory' public agency: the Environmental Health Department in Kumasi and Accra, Ghana, where privatisation and contracting-out of sanitary services have imposed new ways of working on Environmental Health Officers. Both internal and external organisational relationships are analysed to explain the extent to which these officers have adapted to more ,client-oriented' ways of working. Their positive organizational culture is credited with much of the positive results achieved, but was not sufficient to cope with the negative impact of politically protected privatisations on the officials' ability to enforce standards. Nor could it entirely overcome the deficiencies in training and incentive structures which should have accompanied the changes in service delivery. [source]


    ACTFL Officers and Executive Council

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS, Issue 3 2003
    Article first published online: 31 DEC 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Corporate Domesticity and Idealised Masculinity: Royal Naval Officers and their Shipboard Homes, 1918,39

    GENDER & HISTORY, Issue 3 2009
    Quintin Colville
    This article explores the interrelationship of masculine identity and corporate domesticity through the example of Royal Naval officers and the quarters they occupied on board ship during the 1920s and 1930s. Through a case study of a surviving warship, it establishes the linkages of this environment to a wider upper-middle-class world of public school common rooms, gentlemen's clubs and family homes. It analyses the role of this shipboard domesticity in defining the idealised and class-specific persona of the naval officer: constructed through foregrounding approved qualities (such as dutifulness, restraint and self-discipline), and suppressing characteristics considered problematic (for instance, introspection, individualism and intellectualism). The article also evaluates the tensions generated by these impersonal and unreachable standards, and the simultaneous ability of the naval home to support corporate and individual behaviours at odds with the officer ideal. The final section explores the gendered nature of these spaces. It argues that while the shipboard home was essentially a male one, the dynamic it engineered between rival ,male' and ,female' domesticities was invariably relational. Officers' communal quarters were routinely used to support and intensify oppositional understandings of masculinity and femininity. Nonetheless, attempts to dispute these boundaries and to internalise feminised qualities of sentiment, attachment and dependency can be detected in the privatised domesticity of the cabin. [source]


    Assessing damaged road verges as a suspended sediment source in the Hampshire Avon catchment, southern United Kingdom

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, Issue 9 2010
    A. L. Collins
    Abstract Diffuse sediment pollution impairs water quality, exerts a key control on the transfer and fate of nutrients and contaminants and causes deleterious impacts on freshwater ecology. A variety of catchment sediment sources can contribute to such problems. Sediment control strategies and effective targeting of mitigation options therefore require robust quantitative information on the key sources of the sediment problem at catchment scale. Recent observations by Catchment Sensitive Farming Officers (CSFO's) in England have highlighted road verges damaged and eroded by passing vehicles, particularly large farm machinery, and livestock herd movement as visually important potential sources of local sediment problems. A study was therefore undertaken to assess the relative importance of damaged road verges as a suspended sediment source in three sub-catchments of the Hampshire Avon drainage basin, southern UK. Road verge sediment contributions were apportioned in conjunction with those from agricultural topsoils and channel banks/subsurface sources. Time-integrating isokinetic samplers were deployed to sample suspended sediment fluxes at the outlets of two control sub-catchments drained by the Rivers Chitterne and Till selected to characterize areas with a low road network density and limited visual evidence of verge damage, as well as the River Sem sub-catchment used to represent areas where road verge damage is more prevalent. The findings of a sediment source fingerprinting investigation based on a combination of intermittent sampling campaigns spanning the period 22/5/02,27/4/08 suggested that the respective overall mean relative sediment contributions from damaged road verges were 5 ± 3%, 4 ± 2% and 20 ± 2%. Relative inputs from damaged road verges for any specific sampling period in the River Sem sub-catchment were as high as 33 ± 2%. Reconstruction of historical sources in the same sub-catchment, based on the geochemical record stored in a floodplain depth profile, suggested that the significance of damaged road verges as a sediment source has increased over the past 15,20 years. The findings provide important information on damaged road verges as a primary source of suspended sediment and imply that catchment sediment control strategies and mitigation plans should consider such verges in addition to those agricultural and channel sources traditionally taken into account when attempting to reduce sediment pressures on aquatic resources. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Young people's perceptions of complaints procedures in local government

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONSUMER STUDIES, Issue 4 2002
    Carol Brennan
    Abstract This study examined 46 young people aged 16,24 years and evaluated their knowledge and awareness of the formal complaints procedures used by local government. Two areas in Scotland, one city (Edinburgh) and one town (Stirling), were chosen to participate in the study. Six focus groups, three in each area, were carried out to identify the level of awareness among the respondents and to permit a cross-section of educational backgrounds to be obtained. A questionnaire was used to assemble a profile on each participant. After analysis of the focus groups, a focused interview with the Corporate Complaints Officers from two councils was undertaken. Each interview incorporated an in-depth discussion regarding the formal complaints procedure while focusing on the young people within their constituency. The research revealed that young people's knowledge and awareness of local government complaints procedures is low, regardless of educational background and area of residence. For a minority, social factors such as confidence and competence do play a role although it is mainly organizational barriers, such as lack of information and access, which are the main causes of the problem. A number of young people indicated that they would complain if they knew how to execute a complaint successfully. The service providers were knowledgeable that awareness is low among this age group. [source]


    Chief Nursing Officers , who are they and what do they do?

    INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Issue 3 2002
    Article first published online: 6 SEP 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Occupational Attachment and Met Expectations as Predictors of Retirement Adjustment of Naval Officers,

    JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2007
    Mary Anne Taylor
    Attachment to one's former occupation and met expectations regarding retirement were proposed as predictors of the adjustment of military retirees. While results suggested that occupational attachment had a minimal impact, the extent to which expectations of civilian work, financial, and family aspects of life were met emerged as significant predictors of satisfaction and adjustment after military retirement. These findings suggest that the characteristics of the post-retirement environment, and expectations regarding this environment, outweigh the importance of occupational attachment in determining post-retirement adjustment in this setting. [source]


    An Evaluation of Perceived Education and Training Needs of Staff Nurses and Care Officers

    JOURNAL OF FORENSIC NURSING, Issue 4 2006
    Michael Brennan
    This study was carried out to ascertain the specific education and training needs of nursing and care officer staff1 working at the Central Mental Hospital (CMH) in Dublin, Ireland, which provides national forensic psychiatric services. This is the first time an education and training needs analysis was conducted for all nursing and care officer staff. [source]


    Control and legacy as functions of perceived criticality in major incidents

    JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE PSYCHOLOGY AND OFFENDER PROFILING, Issue 3 2004
    Jonathan Crego
    Abstract This paper outlines a model that captures the experiences of 28 Senior Officers who have managed some of the most significant police incidents in the UK in the past 5 years. The process for capturing the model rests on ,pragmatic psychology' (Fishman, 1999; Alison, West & Goodwill, 2003), a paradigm that recognizes practitioners' experiences as a central component of research and policy development. We utilized a set of connected electronic notebooks to enable each critical incident manager to log their experiences and views of the case that they managed. As each individual logs this information, it is simultaneously distributed to all participants. Thus, information is rapidly shared, stimulating further thought and discussion. Following the initial knowledge-sharing phase, participants reorder the material into themed categories that can then be scored against specific criteria (in this case ,impact' and ,ease'). This session revealed that senior officers consider a combination of two co-occurring issues as most significant in defining the ,criticality' of the incident: (i) how direct an impact the facet has on the enquiry at hand; and (ii) whether that issue will influence how the service will be judged (by the community, the victims and the media). These issues were perceived as the most complex and difficult to deal with. We argue that this perception is a joint function of perceived lack of control alongside the belief that judgment and blame regarding the incident will ultimately reside with them as managers. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Becoming an undercover police officer: a note on fairness perceptions, behavior, and attitudes,

    JOURNAL OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR, Issue 4 2003
    Suzanne J. Farmer
    Reactions to an undercover police officer selection system were analyzed for 271 officers. Officers given undercover assignments had higher procedural justice perceptions and outcome satisfaction than others awaiting assignment in a qualified applicant pool. Procedural and distributive justice perceptions were subsequently related to the undercover officer's job performance, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Report of the Council for the session 2006,2007

    JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY: SERIES A (STATISTICS IN SOCIETY), Issue 4 2007
    Council Report
    President's foreword., This year's annual report shows another very successful year for the Society. The range of the Society's new initiatives bears testament to our vigour and to the energy and enthusiasm of Fellows and staff. It is difficult to summarize all of these but I offer a brief overview of some of the highlights. This year we have awarded the first annual prize for ,Statistical excellence in journalism'. It is too easy to bemoan the general quality of coverage of statistical issues in the press and other media. But simply moaning does not improve the situation. As a positive step, on the instigation of Sheila Bird and Andrew Garratt, the Society decided to initiate an award for the best journalistic coverage of a statistical issue. This year first prize was awarded to Ben Goldacre of The Guardian. I hope that these annual awards will offer a positive focus on good coverage and help us to promote best practice. This year, also, we have set up the Professional Development Centre to act as a focus for statistical training both for statisticians and for others who use statistical methods as part of their work. It thus reflects our support for continuing professional development for our Fellows and at the same time provides outreach to members of the statistical user community who want to improve their statistical skills. We welcome Nicola Bright as the Director of the Centre and wish her every success. I am pleased to say that it is not just the Society centrally that has taken new activities this year. The Manchester Local Group have initiated a prize for final year undergraduates from any higher education institute in the north-west. At a time when there are concerns about the number of well-qualified graduates coming into the statistics profession this seems an excellent way to attract the attention of final year undergraduates. I wish this initiative every success. Another development to which the Society has contributed is the Higher Education Funding Council for England project ,more maths grads' which is designed to promote participation in undergraduate degrees in the mathematical sciences. A good supply of mathematically trained graduates is essential to the UK economy in general and to the health of the statistics discipline in particular. It is good that the Society is involved in practical developments that are aimed at increasing participation. The final new initiative that I shall draw attention to is the ,first-in-man' report which is concerned with the statistical design of drug trials aimed at testing novel treatment types. The working party was set up as a result of the adverse reactions suffered by healthy volunteers to a first-in-man trial of monoclonal antibodies and who were subsequently admitted to Northwick Park hospital. The report makes a series of recommendations about the design of such trials and will, I hope, contribute to the safety of future trials. I would like to thank Stephen Senn and the members of the working party for their considerable efforts. As well as these new initiatives there were, of course, many other continuing activities that are noteworthy. The annual conference in Belfast was a great success with many lively sessions and a good number of participants. In particular it was good to see a high number of young statisticians participating in the conference, reflecting the continuing impact of the Young Statisticians Forum on which I commented in the previous annual report. Another continuing activity for the Society is the statistical legislation going through Parliament as I write. The Society has long campaigned for legislation for official statistics. The issue now is to try to get good legislation which will have the required effect and will help the Government Statistical Service and other statistical producers to produce high quality, authoritative statistics in an environment that commands public confidence. As first published, the Society was disappointed with the Bill but we have worked to build support for amendments that, in our view, are essential. Time alone will tell how effective the final legislation will be in meeting our aims. I would like to draw attention to the success of the Membership Services team. We, although with other statistical Societies, have experienced a decline in membership in recent years but the team have turned this round. They are helping to recruit new Fellows and to retain the commitment of existing Fellows. This is a fine achievement and I would like to thank Nicola Emmerson, Ed Swires-Hennessy and the whole team. Finally we have, at last, reached a conclusion in our dealings with the Privy Council and will implement the second phase of constitutional changes. In future our business year, financial year and year for elected appointments will all coincide on a calendar year basis. There will be transitional arrangements but in due course all our administrative arrangements will coincide and will improve efficiency and co-ordination. This has been a long journey, steered effectively by our Director General, Ivor Goddard, and I congratulate him for a successful outcome on your behalf. As you read this report, I hope that you will share my impression of a Society that is lively and spawning many new programmes. We have a dual commitment: to the well-being of statistics as a discipline and to the promotion of statistical understanding and practice to the benefit of Society at large. In both respects I feel that the Society is in good health. This is due to the unstinting efforts of a large number of individual volunteers, including in particular our Honorary Officers and also, of course, the staff at Errol Street. On behalf of all Fellows, I wish to express my thanks to everyone involved. Tim Holt [source]


    Suspect Police Officers Investigated by Former Police Officers: Good Idea, Bad Idea?

    LAW & POLICY, Issue 4 2001
    Sergio Herzog
    Up to 1992, all illegal use-of-force complaints against police officers in Israel were handled internally by the police department. In 1992, following public and political pressure, an external civilian board was established to handle such cases. In this framework, investigations of suspect police officers are conducted by former police officers. In this study, investigators' and suspects' personal and organizational characteristics were examined, as well as their attitudes to the civilian board and the manifestation of police violence. In general, the two groups were found to differ significantly on both levels. The employment of former police officers with high professional qualities seems to have some advantages in this investigative situation. [source]


    Prisoners' Adjustment, Correctional Officers, and Context: The Foreground and Background of Punishment in Late Modernity

    LAW & SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 2 2008
    Mike Vuolo
    Past research indicates that front-line criminal justice workers are the critical players in determining whether innovations in penal policy are realized. Recent attempts to understand the diversity in the application of the penal harm movement have, however, sidestepped the primary audience of these policies, the population of convicted offenders. This article uses data from two prisons to examine the effects of correctional officers on women prisoners' adjustment to prison life. Using regression models and interview data, we find that correctional officer behavior has a profound impact on women's ability to adjust to prison, and this effect is largely independent of the prisoners' characteristics and the institutions in which they are housed. On a theoretical level, the findings speak to recent calls to examine the background and foreground of penal culture. On a practical level, they highlight the need to understand the environments from which women are emerging, not just the communities into which they are released. [source]


    Senior house officers' experience of a six month post in a hospice

    MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 1 2002
    M Lloyd Williams
    Background Hospices provide care for patients with a terminal prognosis , a very small number of hospices employ Senior House Officers. Method A survey was carried out to determine the experiences of SHOs working in hospices and their perceptions of the learning opportunities available. Perceived stress was measured by a Visual Analogue scale and psychological distress by the GHQ 12. Results Of the 38 posts identified 23 SHOs (60%) responded and the majority had qualified during the last five years. Formal teaching was limited, but experiential teaching was very positively described. Many SHOs described their posts as stressful and cited staff conflict and caring for young patients as particularly stressful. Median stress scores as measured on the VAS was 55 mm (range 0,98 mm). Five respondents 22% scored for identifiable psychological distress on the GHQ 12. Conclusion Conclusions include the need to acknowledge the important learning opportunities provided within hospices but also the need for consultant staff to be aware of the sources of stress for SHOs and their need for support. [source]


    Shipboard Maintenance: What Do Surface Warfare Officers Need to Know,and When Do They Need to Know It?

    NAVAL ENGINEERS JOURNAL, Issue 2 2008
    KENNETH R. SYDOW
    As the Navy has moved into the 21st century and the War on Terror has unfolded, the challenges to ship maintenance management have never been greater. These challenges include: a continuing high operating tempo compounded by less predictable schedules and coupled with fewer, shorter scheduled opportunities to conduct maintenance; a fleet of fewer albeit more capable,and therefore more complex,ships; a trend toward smaller, perhaps less stable crews to operate and maintain the ships; and continuing competition for the available budget dollars between operations and maintenance, as well as between current and future readiness concerns. In an era of "operations focused maintenance," what is the role of the Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) in managing their shipboard maintenance? What do they need to know, and when do they need to know it? This paper addresses these questions and related issues and offers, where applicable, some near-term and long-term recommendations for improvement. [source]


    ASNE DAY 2004, New Officers

    NAVAL ENGINEERS JOURNAL, Issue 3 2004
    Dave Sargent RADM USN (Ret.)
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Corporate Officer Wrongdoing and the Fiduciary Duties of Corporate Officers under Delaware Law

    AMERICAN BUSINESS LAW JOURNAL, Issue 3 2007
    Aaron D. Jones
    First page of article [source]