Objects

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Objects

  • arbitrary object
  • art object
  • boundary object
  • compact object
  • compact symmetric object
  • everyday object
  • foreign object
  • geometric object
  • good object
  • individual object
  • learning object
  • material object
  • moving object
  • multiple object
  • near-earth object
  • new object
  • novel object
  • one object
  • other object
  • physical object
  • quasi-stellar object
  • real object
  • red object
  • religious object
  • same object
  • scattering object
  • similar object
  • small object
  • specific object
  • stellar object
  • symmetric object
  • target object
  • test object
  • three-dimensional object
  • transitional object
  • virtual object
  • young stellar object

  • Terms modified by Objects

  • object category
  • object characteristic
  • object detection
  • object location
  • object model
  • object motion
  • object processing
  • object recognition
  • object relation
  • object relation theory
  • object representation
  • object shape

  • Selected Abstracts


    THE POWER OF THE OBJECT

    CURATOR THE MUSEUM JOURNAL, Issue 2 2002
    ANDREW PEKARIK
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    [Commentary] DOES IT MATTER WHERE THE DRINKING IS, WHEN THE OBJECT IS GETTING DRUNK?

    ADDICTION, Issue 1 2009
    ROBIN ROOM
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    [Commentary] WHEN THE OBJECT IS TO GET DRUNK, PRE-DRINKING MATTERS

    ADDICTION, Issue 1 2009
    SAMANTHA WELLS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    THE OBJECT OF DESIRE SPEAKS: INGEBORG BACHMANN'S ,UNDINE GEHT' AND LUCE IRIGARAY 'S ,WOMAN'

    GERMAN LIFE AND LETTERS, Issue 2 2008
    Lorraine Markotic
    ABSTRACT This article presents a detailed examination of Ingeborg Bachmann's ,Undine geht'. It argues for the uniqueness of this work: the text's astonishing ability to depict an object who is also a subject, able to articulate her otherness. Undine is a speaking and desiring subject at the same time as she remains an object of projection. The article compares Bachmann's short story with Irigaray's extensive philosophical and feminist project, showing the many ways in which ,Undine geht' anticipates (and is ultimately more successful than) Irigaray's concept of ,woman' and her mimetic strategy. Bachmann's Undine subversively mimes what she represents; she both incarnates and eludes her representation as man's imaginary other. While ,Undine geht' appears to provide an alternative conception of female subjectivity or to articulate repressed female desire, it ultimately explores the radical complexity of these concepts. Bachmann's short story illustrates, moreover, the salience of Irigaray's attempt to examine the way in which language constructs and reproduces sexual difference. ,Undine geht' goes further, however, by also exploring the constitutive role of narrative and culture in subjectivity. The text is less an account of a female figure who finds her voice than of the difficulty and impediments to so doing. [source]


    REMEMBERING A DEPRESSIVE PRIMARY OBJECT

    THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 1 2002
    Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber
    Memory has always been a central issue in psychoanalytic theory and practice. Recent developments in the cognitive and neural sciences suggest that traditional notions of memory based on stored structures which are also often underlying psychoanalytic thinking cannot account for a number of fundamental phenomena and thus need to be revised. We suggest that memory be conceived as a) a theoretical construct explaining current behaviour by reference to events that have happened in the past. b) Memory is not to be conceived as stored structures but as a function of the whole organism, as a complex, dynamic, recategorising and interactive process, which is always ,embodied'. c) Memory always has a subjective and an objective side. The subjective side is given by the individual's history, the objective side by the neural patterns generated by the sensory motor interactions with the environment. This implies that both ,narrative' (subjective) and ,historical' (objective) truth have to be taken into account achieving stable psychic change as is illustrated by extensive clinical materials taken from a psychoanalysis with a psychogenic sterile borderline patient. [source]


    SUBJECT, OBJECT, MIMESIS: THE AESTHETIC WORLD OF THE BECHERS' PHOTOGRAPHY

    ART HISTORY, Issue 5 2009
    SARAH E. JAMES
    This paper will examine the critical relationship between subjectivity and objecthood established in Bernd and Hilla Bechers' photography. Building upon existing readings by Blake Stimson and Michael Fried, I argue that Adorno's aesthetic thought, and especially his category of mimesis, offers a way in which both to frame the politics of the subject and object experiences in the Bechers' photography, and to situate these culturally, contextualizing their work within a critical juncture in German history. The Bechers' rejection of the subject and the pursuit of an objective photography are explored in relation to the ,post-Auschwitz taboo on beauty' and the anti-ideology that dominated West Germany of the 1950s. The Bechers' attempt to redeem expression by presenting the frail objectivity and historicity of things is examined in relation to the negative dialectical framework and desubjectifying model of aesthetics formulated by Adorno. [source]


    PRIVILEGING THE OBJECT OF SCULPTURE: ACTUALITY AND HARRY BATES'S PANDORA OF 1890

    ART HISTORY, Issue 1 2005
    David J. Getsy
    Sculptural representation negotiates between being an image (for instance, a female nude) and an object (a thing made of marble, bronze, etc.). Questions of literality and objecthood are often reserved for assessments of later modernist sculpture, but I demonstrate that this same fundamental set of concerns preoccupied the late-Victorian sculptor Harry Bates in his Pandora of 1890. In this work, Bates staged sculptural actuality , that is, the equivalence in a sculpture between the thing represented and the sculptural object itself. He did so in order to position himself within late-Victorian debates about the future of sculpture and to make a polemical case for the potency of the decorative object as a new avenue for sculptors' efforts. Beyond allowing a reconsideration of the art-theoretical sophistication of so-called ,academic' nineteenth-century sculpture, Bates's Pandora illuminates on a more general level the parameters of sculptural representation. [source]


    IS THE ANALYST A GOOD OBJECT?

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 3 2006
    Warren Colman
    ABSTRACT This paper suggests that the prohibition against ,taking the role of the good object' may inhibit therapists from an appropriate recognition of loving relation between the patient and themselves. It is argued that the prohibition actually refers to a defensive attempt to get the analyst to take the role of the idealized object as a defence against the emergence of bad objects in the transference. This clinical scenario is contrasted with one where the patient needs to find in their therapist a real good object who genuinely cares for them. [source]


    PSYCHIC RETREATS REVISITED: BINDING PRIMITIVE DESTRUCTIVENESS, OR SECURING THE OBJECT?

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 2 2002
    A MATTER OF EMPHASIS?
    ABSTRACT This paper argues that a potent cause of impasse in analysis/psychotherapy is the fear of annihilation by uncontained affect, and that the ,retreat'(Steiner 1993) to which the patient has recourse is often prompted by such anxiety rather than by paranoid-schizoid or depressive anxiety. Such retreats are marked by defensive attempts to occupy the object, to abolish separation, and to avoid emotional links that are feared will bring on the overwhelming affect related to attachment failures from the past. Thus, analysis itself is perceived unconsciously to be the disaster against which the patient is likely to implement an impasse. This approach offers an alternative to the concept of retreat as described by Steiner (ibid.), but is not intended to replace it. Either model may be indicated clinically in different circumstances. The author introduces the theories of Armando Ferrari and Ignacio Matte Blanco, both consonant with Ogden's theory of the autistic-contiguous position and offering alternative explanations for the clinical phenomena. The technical implications of these considerations are then discussed in relation to some of the clinical material from Steiner's (2000) paper, ,Containment, enactment and communication'. [source]


    TIME OF HISTORY AND TIME OUT OF HISTORY: THE SISTINE CHAPEL AS ,THEORETICAL OBJECT'

    ART HISTORY, Issue 3 2007
    GIOVANNI CARERI
    Drawing on Mieke Bal's construction of a critical history of art, which facilitates the extension of Walter Benjamin's philosophy to the visual arts, this essay reconsiders Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel in Rome, attentive to the conditions that allows the work of art from the past to appear in the present. Two forms of anachronism are proposed: the first may be understood as constituting the temporal structure of the Sistine Chapel up to its completion in 1542; the second, by contrast, is concerned with our ,present' and is a more audacious form of anachronism defined by the relationship between Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot and the Chapel, particularly the ,Ancestors of Christ'. In elucidating these connections, Careri proposes ,constellation' rather than influence to signify deep and problematic relations. [source]


    CONTEXTUALIZING LEARNING OBJECTS USING ONTOLOGIES

    COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, Issue 3 2007
    Phaedra Mohammed
    Educational research over the past three years has intensified such that the context of learning resources needs to be properly modeled. Many researchers have described and even mandated the use of ontologies in the research being conducted, yet the process of actually connecting one or more ontologies to a learning object has not been extensively discussed. This paper describes a practical model for associating multiple ontologies with learning objects while making full use of the IEEE LOM specification. The model categorizes these ontologies according to five major categories of context based on the most popular fields of study actively being pursued by the educational research community: Thematic context, Pedagogical context, Learner context, Organizational context, and Historical/Statistical context. [source]


    HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FOR COOKIE SHAPED OBJECTS IN A HOT AIR JET IMPINGEMENT OVEN

    JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESS ENGINEERING, Issue 1 2001
    N. NITIN
    ABSTRACT Correlations for average heat transfer coefficient for cookie shaped objects in a hot air jet impingement oven were obtained using aluminum cookie models. The study was carried out in a pilot plant scale hot air jet impingement oven. The effects of individual cookie position, presence of surrounding cookies, air velocity, air temperature and rotation of the oven plate on average surface heat transfer coefficient were investigated. The value of the heat transfer coefficient ranged between 100,225 W/m2K and was found to be a strong function of jet air velocity. The impact of surrounding cookies on the heat transfer coefficient was more for smaller cookies, which had larger cookie-to-cookie spacing. [source]


    III. SIMULATIONS 1a, 1b, AND 1c: THE ROLE OF MOVING PARTS IN FORMING REPRESENTATIONS OF OBJECTS

    MONOGRAPHS OF THE SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 1 2008
    Article first published online: 16 MAR 200
    First page of article [source]


    CORTICAL DYNAMICS FOR VISUAL KNOWLEDGE ABOUT OBJECTS: WHERE VISION MEETS MEMORY

    PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 2007
    Article first published online: 14 AUG 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    METAPHYSICAL ARGUMENTS AGAINST ORDINARY OBJECTS

    THE PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 224 2006
    Amie L. Thomasson
    Several prominent attacks on the objects of ,folk ontology' argue that these would be omitted from a scientific ontology, or would be ,rivals' of scientific objects for their claims to be efficacious, occupy space, be composed of parts, or possess a range of other properties. I examine causal redundancy and over determination arguments, ,nothing over and above' appeals, and arguments based on problems with collocation and with property additivity. I argue that these share a common problem: applying conjunctive principles to cases in which the claims conjoined are not analytically independent. This unified diagnosis provides a way of defending ordinary objects against these common objections, while also yielding warnings about certain uses of general conjunctive principles. [source]


    DETECTING FORGERIES AMONG ANCIENT GOLD OBJECTS USING THE U,Th,4He DATING METHOD,

    ARCHAEOMETRY, Issue 4 2009
    O. EUGSTER
    Forgeries of ancient gold objects are prevalent in almost every collection and some public exhibitions in the past have been exposed as containing forgeries to an embarrassing extent. This situation comes from the fact that it is sometimes impossible to unequivocally recognize forgeries based on their patina or manufacturing and decoration characteristics. We demonstrate that for 13 ancient gold objects the time of their last melting process can be estimated using the U,Th,4He dating technique. The extremely small quantities of radiogenic 4He found, due to the young age and small sample size, require the use of a specially designed ultrasensitive mass spectrometer. We show that the proposed method is a powerful, and the only, quantitative tool in archaeometry for discriminating between fake and genuine ancient gold objects. [source]


    COMPOSITIONAL VARIATION IN ROMAN COLOURLESS GLASS OBJECTS FROM THE BOCHOLTZ BURIAL (THE NETHERLANDS)*

    ARCHAEOMETRY, Issue 3 2009
    D. J. HUISMAN
    We investigated the major and trace element composition and Pb and Sr isotope characteristics of a series of about 20 colourless glass objects from a single high-status Roman burial from the Netherlands (Bocholtz). The major elements show a relatively homogeneous group, with one outlier. This is corroborated by the Sr isotopes. Based on the Sb and Pb content, three major groups can be discerned, with two other outliers. This grouping is corroborated by the contents of the trace elements Bi, Sn, Ag, As and Mo, and by variations in lead isotopic ratios. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the glass of all objects was probably made with sand and lime from the same source. The variation in trace elements and lead isotope composition is most likely the result of variations in the composition of the sulphidic antimony ore(s) that were used to decolourize the glass. The composition of the Bocholtz glass is compared with that of other Roman glass, and implications for production models, trade and use of colourless glass objects are discussed. On the basis of isotopic and major element variation, we conclude that the antimony ore presumably originated from different mines. [source]


    OCCURRENCES OF GREEN EARTH PIGMENT ON NORTHWEST COAST FIRST NATIONS PAINTED OBJECTS*

    ARCHAEOMETRY, Issue 3 2009
    I. N. M. WAINWRIGHT
    An analytical study of First Nations painted objects from the Northwest Coast showed that green earth (celadonite) was used as a green pigment by Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian artists. Green earth appears to have been used less frequently by Heiltsuk and Kwakwaka'wakw artists and was not found on Coast Salish or Nuu-chah-nulth objects. Microscopical samples of green paint from 82 Northwest Coast objects, as well as several pigment sources and mineral specimens, were analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or X-ray diffraction. Green earth was the most frequently identified green pigment, found in approximately 40% of the samples. [source]


    ENVELOPING OBJECTS: ALLEGORY AND COMMODITY FETISH IN WENCESLAUS HOLLAR'S PERSONIFICATIONS OF THE SEASONS AND FASHION STILL LIFES

    ART HISTORY, Issue 3 2006
    JOSEPH MONTEYNE
    While in London during the 1640s Wenceslaus Hollar produced a striking cycle of etchings using contemporary female figures as allegories of the seasons, followed by another series of still lifes depicting fashion accessories, in which fur muffs appear repeatedly. This article focuses on the connections between the personi-fications of winter and the still lifes, and brings out the tensions that transpire when the disinterested and supposedly objective eye utilized in Hollar's other projects of the 1640s is revealed as an eye steeped with ambivalent desires , not just in relation to the bodies of certain women, but to the commodity form as well. The fur muff in these etchings is shown to be an enigmatic entity, not only intersecting with issues related to fetishism, eroticism and urban space in early modern London, but is also poised on a threshold between different economies of the object, between residual classical and medieval systems of representation and newly emergent anxieties about the commodity and exchange value. [source]


    TRANSFORMATIONAL, CONSERVATIVE AND TERMINAL OBJECTS: THE APPLICATION OF BOLLAS'S CONCEPTS TO PRACTICE

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 1 2000
    Gabriela Mann
    ABSTRACT This paper focuses on Christopher Bollas's contributions to the understanding of transformations in object usage. Bollas has delineated numerous kinds of object usage but has not described the possible transformations that could occur as a result of psychotherapy. The author examines conservative and terminal objects, on the one hand, and transformational objects, on the other hand, as signifiers for the kinds of transformation that are likely to occur in psychotherapy. Two vignettes informed by Bollas's ideas will illustrate how the therapist can facilitate the patient' s use of the therapeutic environment that,transforms' rather than,conserves' or,terminates' psychic evolution. The author describes how Bollas draws from diverse theoretical sources, particularly from Freud, Winnicott and Bion. The author also suggests that unrestricted use of different theoretical frameworks is consistent with Bollas's favoring free movement between different modes of interpretation. It is argued that this flexibility of moving between modalities is indeed the chief distinguishing characteristic of Bollas's therapeutic style. [source]


    Object combining: a new aggressive optimization for object intensive programs

    CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 5-6 2005
    Ronald Veldema
    Abstract Object combining tries to put objects together that have roughly the same life times in order to reduce strain on the memory manager and to reduce the number of pointer indirections during a program's execution. Object combining works by appending the fields of one object to another, allowing allocation and freeing of multiple objects with a single heap (de)allocation. Unlike object inlining, which will only optimize objects where one has a (unique) pointer to another, our optimization also works if there is no such relation. Object inlining also directly replaces the pointer by the inlined object's fields. Object combining leaves the pointer in place to allow more combining. Elimination of the pointer accesses is implemented in a separate compiler optimization pass. Unlike previous object inlining systems, reference field overwrites are allowed and handled, resulting in much more aggressive optimization. Our object combining heuristics also allow unrelated objects to be combined, for example, those allocated inside a loop; recursive data structures (linked lists, trees) can be allocated several at a time and objects that are always used together can be combined. As Java explicitly permits code to be loaded at runtime and allows the new code to contribute to a running computation, we do not require a closed-world assumption to enable these optimizations (but it will increase performance). The main focus of object combining in this paper is on reducing object (de)allocation overhead, by reducing both garbage collection work and the number of object allocations. Reduction of memory management overhead causes execution time to be reduced by up to 35%. Indirection removal further reduces execution time by up to 6%. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Prostitution as a Male Object of Epistemological Pain

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 2 2002
    Hugo Letiche
    It is not, in the first place, prostitutes' physical and psychological pain that is examined in this article, but the pain encountered in trying to come to terms with the studying of prostitution. Prostitution upsets consciousness' efforts and confuses its epistemes of representation. It reveals issues of (male) avoidance and over-rationalization that apply just as well to how business and organization are (not) studied, as to prostitution. Following Artaud, we examine how, because prostitution is both consciousness (idea, theory, representation) and body (sex, body, the physiology of the brain), it poses the problem of doubling. How can one apprehend both: (i) that one is the physical hyle (materiality) of thought and also (ii) remain aware of the contents of consciousness? Artaud claimed that only in ,cruelty' and the ,scream' could the mind and body be grasped at once. By contrast, Derrida proposes via the subjectile to glide over the space between consciousness and body, trying to acknowledge but not be stymied by the double. Finally, we turn to Irigaray who has accepted doubling and has made it epistemologically productive. [source]


    Medial temporal lobe activity at recognition increases with the duration of mnemonic delay during an object working memory task

    HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING, Issue 11 2007
    Marco Picchioni
    Abstract Object working memory (WM) engages a disseminated neural network, although the extent to which the length of time that data is held in WM influences regional activity within this network is unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study a delayed matching to sample task in 14 healthy subjects, manipulating the duration of mnemonic delay. Across all lengths of delay, successful recognition was associated with the bilateral engagement of the inferior and middle frontal gyri and insula, the medial and inferior temporal, dorsal anterior cingulate and the posterior parietal cortices. As the length of time that data was held in WM increased, activation at recognition increased in the medial temporal, medial occipito-temporal, anterior cingulate and posterior parietal cortices. These results confirm the components of an object WM network required for successful recognition, and suggest that parts of this network, including the medial temporal cortex, are sensitive to the duration of mnemonic delay. Hum Brain Mapp 2007. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Introductory review on object oriented paradigm for full-wave microwave CAD

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RF AND MICROWAVE COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING, Issue 4 2002
    G. Liotta
    Abstract Object oriented (OO) techniques are proving useful in software engineering for dealing with complex systems and for increasing the ease of code development and maintainability. However, their application to electromagnetic modeling is still in its infancy. A brief introduction for microwave engineers to OO paradigms is made. A review of the state of the art in OO full-wave electromagnetic modeling is made, an illustrative example is shown, and likely future trends are discussed. 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J RF and Microwave CAE 12: 341,353, 2002. Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/mmce10031 [source]


    Karl Barth, Emil Brunner and the Subjectivity of the Object of Christian Hope

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
    JOHN C. McDOWELL
    The Barth,Brunner debate of 1934, although not specifically about hope, provides resources for exploring the radical nature of Christian hope. [source]


    Optimal Representative Blocks for the Efficient Tracking of a Moving Object

    JOURNAL OF FIELD ROBOTICS (FORMERLY JOURNAL OF ROBOTIC SYSTEMS), Issue 3 2004
    SangJoo Kim
    Optimal representative blocks are proposed for an efficient tracking of a moving object and it is verified experimentally by using a mobile robot with a pan-tilt camera. The key idea comes from the fact that when the image size of a moving object is shrunk in an image frame according to the distance between the camera of mobile robot and the moving object, the tracking performance of a moving object can be improved by shrinking the size of representative blocks according to the object image size. Motion estimation using edge detection (ED) and block-matching algorithm (BMA) are often used in the case of moving object tracking by vision sensors. However, these methods often miss the real-time vision data since these schemes suffer from the heavy computational load. To overcome this problem and to improve the tracking performance, the optimal representative block that can reduce a lot of data to be computed is defined and optimized by changing the size of the representative block according to the size of object in the image frame. The proposed algorithm is verified experimentally by using a mobile robot with a two degree-of-freedom active camera. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Overexpression of GLUT-1 in the invasion front is associated with depth of oral squamous cell carcinoma and prognosis

    JOURNAL OF ORAL PATHOLOGY & MEDICINE, Issue 1 2010
    Shinichi Ohba
    J Oral Pathol Med (2010) 39: 74,78 Object:, Malignant cells show increased uptake, which is considered to be facilitated by glucose transporters (GLUTs). Increased GLUT-1 expression has been reported in many human cancers. We hypothesized that a oral squamous cell carcinoma, characterized by high frequency of lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis or local recurrences, was associated with GLUT-1 overexpression in invasion front. Methods:, GLUT-1 immunostaining in invasion front was studied on 24 oral squamous cell carcinomas, and revealed the correlation with the clinical characteristics. Result:, The analysis showed that all oral squamous cell carcinoma patients and GLUT-1 expression correlated the depth of the tumors (P = 0.023 < 0.05). Furthermore the survival of patients who had overexpression of invasion front was significant shorter than that of patients with GLUT-1 weakly positive (P = 0.046 < 0.05). No significant association was noted between GLUT-1 immunostaining and either age, gender, subsites, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusion:, The present study shows that GLUT-1 served as a marker indicating that tumors with deep invasion tended to result in a worse prognosis in patients due to either lymph node metastasis, a recurrence of the primary lesion or distant metastasis. [source]


    How to Define an Object: Evidence from the Effects of Action on Perception and Attention

    MIND & LANGUAGE, Issue 5 2007
    GLYN W. HUMPHREYS
    For example, patients who show visual extinction are more likely to become aware of two objects if the objects fall in appropriate visual locations for a common action. This effect of the action relations between objects is modulated both by the familiarity of the positioning of the objects for action, and by the mere possibility of action (the ,affordance') between the objects. In addition, the programming of an action to a part of an object alters the representation of that object, making the ,part' into the object selected by the visual system. These results point to object coding being a rather flexible process, affected not only by the perceptual properties of stimuli but also by the relations between these properties and action. We discuss the implications for theories of perception as well as considering why action information, in particular, may be important for perception. [source]


    On the reported death of the MACHO era

    MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY: LETTERS (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2009
    D. P. Quinn
    ABSTRACT We present radial velocity measurements of four wide halo binary candidates from the sample in Chaname & Gould (CG04) which, to date, is the only sample containing a large number of such candidates. The four candidates that we have observed have projected separations >0.1 pc, and include the two widest binaries from the sample, with separations of 0.45 and 1.1 pc. We confirm that three of the four CG04 candidates are genuine, including the one with the largest separation. The fourth candidate, however, is spurious at the 5, level. In the light of these measurements, we re-examine the implications for MAssive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) models of the Galactic halo. Our analysis casts doubt on what MACHO constraints can be drawn from the existing sample of wide halo binaries. [source]


    Redefining the Ethnographic Object: An Anthropology Museum Turns Fifty

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 3 2000
    Saloni Mathur
    Exhibit A: Objects of Intrigue. Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, March 9, 1999,March 31, 2000. Objects and Expressions: Celebrating the Collections of the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Vancouver: Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, 1999. [source]