Otolith Chemistry (otolith + chemistry)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Age-related movement patterns and population structuring in southern garfish, Hyporhamphus melanochir, inferred from otolith chemistry

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT & ECOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
M. A. STEER
Abstract, The southern garfish, Hyporhamphus melanochir (Val.), is an important inshore fishery species in South Australia. Over the past few years there have been concerns with this fishery, which is now considered to be over-exploited. Currently, the fishery is assumed to consist of two separate stocks, but there is no understanding of movement patterns both within and between these two stocks to justify this assumption. Otolith chemistry was used to infer age-related patterns of movement, delineate potential sub-populations and determine the extent of mixing within South Australian coastal waters. Results indicated that the population structuring of garfish is more complex than previously assumed and it seems that stocks can be discriminated at a much finer spatial scale. Garfish collected from sites separated by <60 km displayed significantly different chemical signatures (relative concentrations of 7Li, 24Mg, 55Mn, 88Sr and 138Ba) in their otoliths, especially during their second year of growth, indicating that they had inhabited different water bodies. From a broader perspective, South Australian garfish can be partitioned into six regional components with various levels of inter-mixing. From these results, it was suggested that assessment and management of the fishery may have to be restructured to align with the smaller spatial units. [source]


Identification of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) stocks from putative nurseries using otolith chemistry

FISHERIES OCEANOGRAPHY, Issue 2 2003
Jay R. Rooker
Abstract Chemical signatures in the otoliths of teleost fishes represent natural tags that may reflect differences in the chemical and physical characteristics of an individuals' environment. Otolith chemistry of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) was quantified to assess the feasibility of using these natural tags to discriminate juveniles (age 0 and age 1) from putative nurseries. A suite of six elements (Li, Mg, Ca, Mn, Sr and Ba) was measured in whole otoliths using solution-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Otolith chemistry of age-1 T. thynnus collected from the two primary nurseries in the Mediterranean Sea and western Atlantic Ocean differed significantly, with a cross-validated classification accuracy of 85%. Spatial and temporal variation in otolith chemistry was evaluated for age-0 T. thynnus collected from three nurseries within the Mediterranean Sea: Alboran Sea (Spain), Ligurian Sea (northern Italy), and Tyrrhenian Sea (southern Italy). Distinct differences in otolith chemistry were detected among Mediterranean nurseries and classification accuracies ranged from 62 to 80%. Interannual trends in otolith chemistry were observed between year classes of age-0 T. thynnus in the Alboran Sea; however, no differences were detected between year classes in the Tyrrhenian Sea. Age-0 and age-1 T. thynnus collected from the same region (Ligurian Sea) were also compared and distinct differences in otolith chemistry were observed, indicating ontogenetic shifts in habitat or elemental discrimination. Findings suggest that otolith chemistry of juvenile T. thynnus from different nurseries are distinct and chemical signatures show some degree of temporal persistence, indicating the technique has considerable potential for use in future assessments of population connectivity and stock structure of T. thynnus. [source]


Otolith chemistry of prey fish consumed by a fish predator: does digestion hinder Russian doll techniques?

JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY, Issue 10 2009
Q. E. Phelps
The effect of digestion by a predatory fish (largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides) on stable isotopic (,13C and ,18O) and trace elemental (Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca) compositions of prey fish (bluegill Lepomis macrochirus) otoliths was investigated in a laboratory experiment. Trace element and stable-isotopic signatures of L. macrochirus otoliths were not significantly altered for up to 16 h after L. macrochirus were consumed by M. salmoides. Prey fish otoliths recovered from predator digesta can retain environmental stable isotopic and trace elemental signatures, suggesting that determination of environmental history for prey fishes by stable-isotope and trace-element analysis of otoliths recovered from stomachs of piscivorous fishes will be feasible. [source]


Age-related movement patterns and population structuring in southern garfish, Hyporhamphus melanochir, inferred from otolith chemistry

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT & ECOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
M. A. STEER
Abstract, The southern garfish, Hyporhamphus melanochir (Val.), is an important inshore fishery species in South Australia. Over the past few years there have been concerns with this fishery, which is now considered to be over-exploited. Currently, the fishery is assumed to consist of two separate stocks, but there is no understanding of movement patterns both within and between these two stocks to justify this assumption. Otolith chemistry was used to infer age-related patterns of movement, delineate potential sub-populations and determine the extent of mixing within South Australian coastal waters. Results indicated that the population structuring of garfish is more complex than previously assumed and it seems that stocks can be discriminated at a much finer spatial scale. Garfish collected from sites separated by <60 km displayed significantly different chemical signatures (relative concentrations of 7Li, 24Mg, 55Mn, 88Sr and 138Ba) in their otoliths, especially during their second year of growth, indicating that they had inhabited different water bodies. From a broader perspective, South Australian garfish can be partitioned into six regional components with various levels of inter-mixing. From these results, it was suggested that assessment and management of the fishery may have to be restructured to align with the smaller spatial units. [source]


Identification of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) stocks from putative nurseries using otolith chemistry

FISHERIES OCEANOGRAPHY, Issue 2 2003
Jay R. Rooker
Abstract Chemical signatures in the otoliths of teleost fishes represent natural tags that may reflect differences in the chemical and physical characteristics of an individuals' environment. Otolith chemistry of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) was quantified to assess the feasibility of using these natural tags to discriminate juveniles (age 0 and age 1) from putative nurseries. A suite of six elements (Li, Mg, Ca, Mn, Sr and Ba) was measured in whole otoliths using solution-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Otolith chemistry of age-1 T. thynnus collected from the two primary nurseries in the Mediterranean Sea and western Atlantic Ocean differed significantly, with a cross-validated classification accuracy of 85%. Spatial and temporal variation in otolith chemistry was evaluated for age-0 T. thynnus collected from three nurseries within the Mediterranean Sea: Alboran Sea (Spain), Ligurian Sea (northern Italy), and Tyrrhenian Sea (southern Italy). Distinct differences in otolith chemistry were detected among Mediterranean nurseries and classification accuracies ranged from 62 to 80%. Interannual trends in otolith chemistry were observed between year classes of age-0 T. thynnus in the Alboran Sea; however, no differences were detected between year classes in the Tyrrhenian Sea. Age-0 and age-1 T. thynnus collected from the same region (Ligurian Sea) were also compared and distinct differences in otolith chemistry were observed, indicating ontogenetic shifts in habitat or elemental discrimination. Findings suggest that otolith chemistry of juvenile T. thynnus from different nurseries are distinct and chemical signatures show some degree of temporal persistence, indicating the technique has considerable potential for use in future assessments of population connectivity and stock structure of T. thynnus. [source]


Interspecific variations of otolith chemistry in estuarine fish nurseries

JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY, Issue 10 2008
P. Reis-Santos
Otolith chemical composition differed between juveniles of five fish species (Solea solea, Solea senegalensis, Platichthys flesus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax) in nursery areas of six estuaries along the Portuguese coast (Douro, Ria de Aveiro, Mondego, Tejo, Sado and Mira). Spatially consistent patterns in the concentration of some elements were responsible for differences between species. Discrimination of estuaries using data from all species simultaneously averaged 447% of correctly classified cases, whilst discrimination of species averaged 762%. Moreover, species-related patterns in otolith fingerprints were highlighted when comparing species for each estuarine nursery area, with intra estuarine species discrimination averages ranging from 862 to 1000%. Similarities in the otolith elemental fingerprints were larger between species with close phylogeny and ecology, particularly between flatfish and perciform species. In addition to the differences in physiological regulation of species, specific microhabitat use in a common environment was suggested as a relevant factor for the differentiation of otolith chemistry among species occurring in the same locations. Despite positive results in specific estuaries, variation in otolith composition limited the use of species as proxies to classify others to their system of origin. [source]


The differentiation of Stegastes partitus populations using lapillar and sagittal otolith chemistry

JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY, Issue 6 2006
P. M. Chittaro
The comparison of elemental concentrations of sagittal and lapillar otoliths from the same individuals of Stegastes partitus indicated significant differences for several elements. Sagittal otoliths were superior at differentiating individuals, yet the differentiation of individuals was further improved when the elemental concentrations of both otolith types were used in the same analysis. [source]


Effect of diet on otolith composition in Pomatomus saltatrix, an estuarine piscivore

JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY, Issue 6 2004
J. A. Buckel
To test the hypothesis that elemental composition of otoliths (sagittae) could be influenced by differences in natural prey type, young-of-the-year bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix were captured immediately after their migration from oceanic waters into mid-Atlantic Bight estuaries and fed either shrimp, Crangon septemspinosa and Palaemonetes spp. or fish Menidia menidia under similar temperature and salinity regimes in two separate 60 day experiments. Unlimited rations of fish and shrimp prey were provided in the first experiment which led to differences in bluefish growth rate between the two prey treatments; fish prey was limited in the second experiment to ensure that growth rates of bluefish in the two prey treatments were similar. Concentrations of seven elements in bluefish otoliths were determined using solution-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). There was no significant effect of diet on five of the seven elements examined (Na, Mg, K, Ca and Mn). The levels of Sr and Ba in the otoliths of shrimp-fed bluefish, however, were significantly higher than fish-fed bluefish in both experiments. Concentrations of Ba in shrimp-fed bluefish otoliths were double that found in fish-fed bluefish. The results suggest that diet can explain some of the variation in otolith chemistry previously attributed to physical and chemical properties of the water. [source]


Long-distance dispersal and local retention of larvae as mechanisms of recruitment in an island population of a coral reef fish

AUSTRAL ECOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
HEATHER M. PATTERSON
Abstract Although recruitment of pelagic larvae is a fundamental and well-documented process in the dynamics of benthic marine populations, identifying the sources of recruitment, or the degree to which populations are connected via dispersal of larvae, has remained elusive for most marine taxa. In this study we used natural environmental markers (trace elements) recorded in fish otoliths (ear stones) as tags of natal origin. Specifically, we used the otolith core and edge chemistries of a locally endemic wrasse (Coris bulbifrons) from Lord Howe Island (LHI), Australia, and a widely distributed species (Coris picta) from three potential mainland source regions, to determine the likely sources of recruitment to C. picta populations on LHI. The use of a local endemic species, which is by definition self-recruiting, is a novel approach for ground-truthing the dispersal history of non-endemic coral reef fish. Discriminant function analyses were able to separate LHI from mainland fish, using both edge and core signatures, with a high degree of accuracy, suggesting at least some of the C. picta collected on LHI were of local origin. This result was corroborated when half of the C. bulbifrons and LHI C. picta were introduced as unknowns into a discriminant function analysis using the remaining C. bulbifrons, LHI C. picta, and the mainland C. picta as a training data set. Overall, our findings suggest that both long distance dispersal and local retention are important sources of recruitment to populations of C. picta on LHI and that otolith chemistry of endemic species could be a useful benchmark for determining the prevalence of self-recruitment in insular populations of other widespread species. [source]