Nursing Terminology (nursing + terminology)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Novel Nursing Terminologies for the Rapid Response System

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2 2009
Elizabeth Wong CRNA
PURPOSE., Nursing terminology with implications for the rapid response system (RRS) is introduced and proposed: critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND), defined as the recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication; critical incident nursing intervention, defined as any indirect or direct care registered nurse-initiated treatment, based upon clinical judgment and knowledge that a registered nurse performs in response to a CIND; and critical incident control, defined as a response that attempts to reverse a life-threatening condition. DATA SOURCES., The current literature, research studies, meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS., The current nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and nursing outcomes listed in the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International Classification, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), respectively, are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of such standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations when activating the RRS. CONCLUSIONS., The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International Classification, NIC, and NOC are urged to refine their classifications and include CIND, critical incident nursing intervention, and critical incident control. The RRS should incorporate standardized nursing terminology to describe patient care during life-threatening situations. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE., Refining the diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes classifications will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on the efficacy of the proposed novel nursing terminology when providing care to patients during life-threatening situations. In addition, including the proposed novel nursing terminology in the RRS offers a means of improving care in such situations. [source]


Coining and Defining Novel Nursing Terminology.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 1 2009
Part 3: Critical Incident Control
PURPOSE.,In the third of a three-part series, a novel nursing terminology is introduced and proposed for inclusion in the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC),Critical incident control (CIC),defined as a response that attempts to reverse a life-threatening condition. Critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND), defined as recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication, and critical incident nursing intervention, defined as any indirect or direct care registered nurse,initiated treatment, based upon clinical judgment and knowledge that a registered nurse performs in response to a CIND, were introduced in Parts 1 and 2 of this series, respectively. DATA SOURCES.,The current literature, research studies, meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS.,The current nursing outcomes in the NOC are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations. CONCLUSION.,Coining and defining novel nursing terminology, CIC, for patient care during life-threatening situations is important and fills the gap in the current standardized nursing terminology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE.,Refining the NOC will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on nursing diagnoses in conjunction with the proposed novel nursing terminology, CIC. [source]


Coining and Defining Novel Nursing Terminology.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 4 2008
Part 2: Critical Incident Nursing Intervention
PURPOSE.,In the second of a three-part series, a novel nursing terminology is introduced and proposed for inclusion in the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC): Critical incident nursing intervention (CINI), defined as any indirect or direct care registered nurse,initiated treatment, based upon clinical judgment and knowledge that a registered nurse performs in response to a critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND). A CIND is defined as recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication. DATA SOURCES.,The literature, research studies, meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS.,The current nursing interventions in the NIC are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations. CONCLUSION.,Coining and defining novel nursing terminology, CINI, for patient care during life-threatening situations is important and fills the gap in the current standardized nursing terminology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE.,Refining the NIC will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on nursing interventions in conjunction with the proposed novel nursing terminology, CINI. The first article in this series (Part 1) introduced the novel nursing terminology: CIND; the present article (Part 2) introduces the novel nursing terminology: CINI; and the third article in this series (Part 3) will introduce the novel nursing terminology: critical incident control. [source]


Coining and Defining Novel Nursing Terminology.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 3 2008
Part 1: Critical Incident Nursing Diagnosis
PURPOSE.,In the first of a three-part series, a novel nursing terminology is introduced and proposed for inclusion in the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) International Classification,Critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND),defined as the recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication. DATA SOURCES.,The literature, research studies, and meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS.,The current nursing diagnoses in the NANDA International Classification are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations. CONCLUSIONS.,Coining and defining a novel nursing terminology, CIND, for patient care during life-threatening situations are important and fill the gap in the current standardized nursing terminology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE.,Refining the NANDA International Classification will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on nursing diagnoses in conjunction with the proposed novel nursing terminology: CIND. Parts 2 and 3 of this series will propose additional nursing terminology: critical incident nursing intervention and critical incident control, respectively. [source]


Novel Nursing Terminologies for the Rapid Response System

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2 2009
Elizabeth Wong CRNA
PURPOSE., Nursing terminology with implications for the rapid response system (RRS) is introduced and proposed: critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND), defined as the recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication; critical incident nursing intervention, defined as any indirect or direct care registered nurse-initiated treatment, based upon clinical judgment and knowledge that a registered nurse performs in response to a CIND; and critical incident control, defined as a response that attempts to reverse a life-threatening condition. DATA SOURCES., The current literature, research studies, meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS., The current nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and nursing outcomes listed in the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International Classification, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), respectively, are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of such standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations when activating the RRS. CONCLUSIONS., The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International Classification, NIC, and NOC are urged to refine their classifications and include CIND, critical incident nursing intervention, and critical incident control. The RRS should incorporate standardized nursing terminology to describe patient care during life-threatening situations. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE., Refining the diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes classifications will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on the efficacy of the proposed novel nursing terminology when providing care to patients during life-threatening situations. In addition, including the proposed novel nursing terminology in the RRS offers a means of improving care in such situations. [source]


Accuracy and Efficiency of Computer-Aided Nursing Diagnosis

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 3 2008
Sachiko Kurashima MSN
PURPOSE.,This study aims to determine whether a computer-aided nursing (CAN) diagnosis system improves diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. METHODS.,A randomized crossover trial was performed using two kinds of case studies with 42 nurses as subjects. The subjects were divided into a group using the CAN diagnosis system and a group using a handbook of nursing diagnosis. Degree of accuracy was judged by using Lunney's seven-point interval scale, while efficiency was evaluated by time required for diagnosis. FINDINGS.,There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of diagnostic accuracy; however, time required for diagnosis was significantly shorter for subjects who used the CAN diagnosis system than for those who did not. Multiple regression analysis showed that the use of the CAN diagnosis system was the only factor associated with the time required for making the nursing diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS.,The use of the CAN diagnosis system improved the efficiency of the diagnostic process without reducing the level of accuracy of nursing diagnoses. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS.,The use of a computerized system should be a useful tool for implementation of standardized nursing terminologies. [source]


Novel Nursing Terminologies for the Rapid Response System

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2 2009
Elizabeth Wong CRNA
PURPOSE., Nursing terminology with implications for the rapid response system (RRS) is introduced and proposed: critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND), defined as the recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication; critical incident nursing intervention, defined as any indirect or direct care registered nurse-initiated treatment, based upon clinical judgment and knowledge that a registered nurse performs in response to a CIND; and critical incident control, defined as a response that attempts to reverse a life-threatening condition. DATA SOURCES., The current literature, research studies, meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS., The current nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and nursing outcomes listed in the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International Classification, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), respectively, are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of such standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations when activating the RRS. CONCLUSIONS., The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International Classification, NIC, and NOC are urged to refine their classifications and include CIND, critical incident nursing intervention, and critical incident control. The RRS should incorporate standardized nursing terminology to describe patient care during life-threatening situations. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE., Refining the diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes classifications will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on the efficacy of the proposed novel nursing terminology when providing care to patients during life-threatening situations. In addition, including the proposed novel nursing terminology in the RRS offers a means of improving care in such situations. [source]


Coining and Defining Novel Nursing Terminology.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 1 2009
Part 3: Critical Incident Control
PURPOSE.,In the third of a three-part series, a novel nursing terminology is introduced and proposed for inclusion in the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC),Critical incident control (CIC),defined as a response that attempts to reverse a life-threatening condition. Critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND), defined as recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication, and critical incident nursing intervention, defined as any indirect or direct care registered nurse,initiated treatment, based upon clinical judgment and knowledge that a registered nurse performs in response to a CIND, were introduced in Parts 1 and 2 of this series, respectively. DATA SOURCES.,The current literature, research studies, meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS.,The current nursing outcomes in the NOC are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations. CONCLUSION.,Coining and defining novel nursing terminology, CIC, for patient care during life-threatening situations is important and fills the gap in the current standardized nursing terminology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE.,Refining the NOC will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on nursing diagnoses in conjunction with the proposed novel nursing terminology, CIC. [source]


Coining and Defining Novel Nursing Terminology.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 4 2008
Part 2: Critical Incident Nursing Intervention
PURPOSE.,In the second of a three-part series, a novel nursing terminology is introduced and proposed for inclusion in the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC): Critical incident nursing intervention (CINI), defined as any indirect or direct care registered nurse,initiated treatment, based upon clinical judgment and knowledge that a registered nurse performs in response to a critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND). A CIND is defined as recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication. DATA SOURCES.,The literature, research studies, meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS.,The current nursing interventions in the NIC are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations. CONCLUSION.,Coining and defining novel nursing terminology, CINI, for patient care during life-threatening situations is important and fills the gap in the current standardized nursing terminology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE.,Refining the NIC will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on nursing interventions in conjunction with the proposed novel nursing terminology, CINI. The first article in this series (Part 1) introduced the novel nursing terminology: CIND; the present article (Part 2) introduces the novel nursing terminology: CINI; and the third article in this series (Part 3) will introduce the novel nursing terminology: critical incident control. [source]


Coining and Defining Novel Nursing Terminology.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 3 2008
Part 1: Critical Incident Nursing Diagnosis
PURPOSE.,In the first of a three-part series, a novel nursing terminology is introduced and proposed for inclusion in the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) International Classification,Critical incident nursing diagnosis (CIND),defined as the recognition of an acute life-threatening event that occurs as a result of disease, surgery, treatment, or medication. DATA SOURCES.,The literature, research studies, and meta-analyses from a variety of disciplines, and personal clinical experience serve as the data sources for this article. DATA SYNTHESIS.,The current nursing diagnoses in the NANDA International Classification are inaccurate or inadequate for describing nursing care during life-threatening situations. The lack of standardized nursing terminology creates a barrier that may impede critical communication and patient care during life-threatening situations. CONCLUSIONS.,Coining and defining a novel nursing terminology, CIND, for patient care during life-threatening situations are important and fill the gap in the current standardized nursing terminology. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE.,Refining the NANDA International Classification will permit nursing researchers, among others, to conduct studies on nursing diagnoses in conjunction with the proposed novel nursing terminology: CIND. Parts 2 and 3 of this series will propose additional nursing terminology: critical incident nursing intervention and critical incident control, respectively. [source]


Is It Time for a New Category of Nursing Diagnosis?

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2 2007
Geralyn A. Meyer PhD
Professional vigilance, the art of "watching out," is the essence of nursing. Vigilance is the mental process that makes the informed nursing actions of assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and evaluation possible and meaningful. Nursing vigilance must be described in our nursing terminology or it risks remaining invisible to others. We propose that the current definition of nursing diagnosis be expanded to include surveillance diagnoses for which the nurse has the responsibility for problem identification and ongoing monitoring. Inclusion of surveillance diagnoses in the NANDA International taxonomy will better reflect the breadth and depth of nursing practice. [source]


Evaluating nursing documentation , research designs and methods: systematic review

JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 3 2009
Kaija Saranto
Abstract Title., Evaluating nursing documentation , research designs and methods: systematic review. Aim., This paper is a report of a review conducted to assess the research methods applied in the evaluation of nursing documentation. Data sources., The material was drawn from three databases: CINAHL, PubMed and Cochrane using the keywords nursing documentation, nursing care plan, nursing record system, evaluation and assessment. The search was confined to relevant electronically-retrievable studies published in the English language from 2000 to 2007. This yielded 41 studies, including two reviews. Methods., Content analysis produced a classification into three themes: nursing documentation, patient-centred documentation and standardized documentation. Each study was assessed according to its research design, methodology, sample size and focus of data collection. In addition, the studies categorized under the heading of standardized documentation were assessed in terms of their outcomes. Results., Most of the studies (n = 19) focused on patient-centred documentation. Most (n = 20) were retrospective studies and used data collected from patient records (n = 35). An audit instrument was used to assess nursing documentation in almost all the studies. Studies classified under the heading of standardized documentation showed more positive than negative effects with respect to quality, the nursing process and terminology use, knowledge level and acceptance of computer use in documentation. Conclusion., The use of structured nursing terminology in electronic patient record systems will extend the scope of documentation research from assessing the quality of documentation to measuring patient outcomes. More data should also be collected from patients and family members when evaluating nursing documentation. [source]