Nursing Students (nursing + student)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Nursing Students

  • baccalaureate nursing student
  • health nursing student
  • undergraduate nursing student

  • Terms modified by Nursing Students

  • nursing student attitude
  • nursing student experience
  • nursing student perception

  • Selected Abstracts


    An Open Letter to Prospective Nursing Students

    JOURNAL FOR SPECIALISTS IN PEDIATRIC NURSING, Issue 2 2003
    Roxie L. Foster PhD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Index of sources of stress in nursing students: a confirmatory factor analysis

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 5 2009
    Chris Gibbons
    Abstract Title.,Index of sources of stress in nursing students: a confirmatory factor analysis. Aim., This paper is a report of a study to test the proposed factor structure of the Index of Sources of Stress in Nursing Students. Background., Research across many countries has identified a number of sources of distress in nursing students but little attempt has been made to understand and measure sources of eustress or those stressors likely to enhance performance and well-being. The Index of Sources of Stress in Nursing Students was developed to do this. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a three-factor structure, the factors being labelled: learning and teaching; placement-related and course organization. It is important, however, to subject the instrument to confirmatory factor analysis as a further test of construct validity. Method., A convenience sample of final year nursing students (n = 176) was surveyed in one university in Northern Ireland in 2007. The Index of Sources of Stress in Nursing Students, which measures sources of stress likely to contribute to distress and eustress, was completed electronically. The lisrel programme was used to carry out the confirmatory factor analysis and test the factor structure suggested in the exploratory analysis. Findings., The proposed factor structure for the items measuring ,Uplifts' proved to be a good fit to the data and the proposed factor structure for the items measuring ,Hassles' showed adequate fit. Conclusion., In nursing programmes adopting the academic model and combining university-based learning with placement experience, this instrument can be used to help identify the sources of stress or course demands that students rate as distressing and those that help them to achieve. The validity of the ISSN could be further evaluated in other education settings. [source]


    The Effect of Creating a Mental Set on Cognitive Learning and Affective Behaviors of Nursing Students

    NURSING FORUM, Issue 4 2009
    Loucine M. D. Huckabay RN
    BACKGROUND., A mental set predisposes a person to view and approach a problem in a predetermined manner. Affective behaviors determine whether students value what they learn. PURPOSE., This study investigated the effect of mental set in the form of negative impressions and anxieties about a nursing course (pathophysiology) on cognitive learning and affective behaviors. RESULTS., Results showed that, irrespective of type of mental set, all students learned significantly. Students who entered the course with a negative set scored significantly lower in affective behaviors than students who entered with a positive or neutral mental set. Predispositions stayed stable; significant changes occurred within each group, but not enough to change a negative set into a positive set or vice versa. IMPLICATIONS., Implications for nursing education and creation of affective behaviors conducive for life-long learning are presented. [source]


    A Community Partnership to Prepare Nursing Students to Respond to Domestic Violence

    NURSING FORUM, Issue 3 2003
    Karen S. Hayward RN, SANE-A
    TOPIC Partnership building to prepare nursing students to respond to domestic violence through service learning. PURPOSE To describe an innovative approach to preparing nursing students to respond to domestic violence. SOURCES Clinical practice and experience, published literature, partner organizations. CONCLUSIONS This community partnership has prepared nursing students to respond effectively and with compassion to individuals and families experiencing violence. This approach can be replicated through a service learning model to support coordinated community response to domestic violence. [source]


    Short-Term Effects of a Health Promotion Course for Taiwanese Nursing Students

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 1 2005
    Ya-Chu Hsiao
    Abstract, The purposes of this study were to (a) develop a teaching course on health promotion for nursing students in Taiwan, (b) evaluate the effects of this teaching course, and (c) understand students' appraisals of its effectiveness in helping them to change unhealthy behavior. A sample of 65 randomly selected female nursing students took an 18-week course developed by the investigators, which included 30 h of classroom lectures and 4 weeks of written reports by students chronicling the changes in their behavior. Health promotion questionnaires administered before and after the course and content analysis of the students' reports were used to evaluate the effects of the course. Students' questionnaire scores after course completion indicated significantly increased intent to adopt healthy lifestyles. Content analysis of students' reports on their personal behavior-changing experiences showed that they accepted the potential value of curriculum aspects such as "experiencing the struggle, suffering, and even abandonment of the process,""experiencing the benefits of change,""increasing self-confidence," and "empathizing with how difficult it is for clients to change behavior." These results support the value of teaching courses on health promotion to nursing students. The authors recommend including such a course as part of a regular nursing education. [source]


    An Active Learning Experience in Health Policy for Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 5 2004
    Mary E. Byrd R.N., Ph.D.
    Abstract Nurses have the potential to promote the public's health through active involvement in shaping health and social policy. Preparing nursing students to influence public policy is a major component of the curriculum in public/community health nursing. A series of learning experiences was designed to engage students in this process. First, students participate in information sessions at the State Health Department and the State House. This provides them with opportunities to engage in dialogue with public health leaders as well as advocates from both professional organizations and community groups. Next, students identify the legislators who represent them in the community and write a narrative that describes the legislators' interest and commitment to health-related legislation. Lastly, students work in clinical groups to analyze a public health problem that can be addressed through public policy interventions. This has led to the students testifying at legislative hearings and working with community groups involved with the issue. The students present their findings to their peers and to the wider college community. Through these learning experiences, students gain practical experience in understanding the political process that leads to important policy change. This in turn prepares them for their roles as professional nurses and involved citizens. [source]


    Preliminary study of stress in undergraduate nursing students in Singapore

    ASIA-PACIFIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 2 2009
    Chi Ching Lim BScN
    Abstract Introduction: Stress experienced by nursing students may adversely affect academic achievement, personal wellbeing and long-term professional capabilities. The current study is the first to report levels and sources of stress among Singaporean students undertaking a pre-registration baccalaureate nursing degree. Methods: An exploratory survey was conducted with students from all three year levels (n=112, 65% response rate) using the Stress in Nursing Students (SINS) scale. Use of this tool also enabled a regional comparison of results with published data from a nursing cohort in Hong Kong. Perceptions of support were measured using the Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS). It was hypothesized that students with higher levels of social support would report less stress. Results: In comparison to other year levels, Year 3 students reported higher levels of overall, clinical, and financial stress. There were statistical differences between Year 3 and Year 1 students in relation to clinical and financial stressors, but not with Year 2, nor were relationships found across year of study and confidence and education subscales. Level of stress was lower compared to Hong Kong nursing students. There were statistically significant differences on stress associated with clinical (P<0.01) and confidence (P<0.001) domains between datasets, but no differences on subscale scores for education and financial stressors. Social support was not statistically associated with stress. Discussion: Student stress increased throughout the program and was not mediated by social support. Awareness of types and progression of stress can inform professional development activities to bolster coping, and minimize adverse psychological, academic and professional consequences. [source]


    An evaluation of the effectiveness of an educational and experiential intervention on nursing students' attitudes towards older people

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 2 2007
    Assumpta Ryan PhD MEd, BSc(Hons), PGCTHE
    Objectives., This paper reports the results of a study that aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational and experiential intervention on nursing students' attitudes towards older people. Background., With repeated exposure to very sick older people in hospitals or nursing homes, nursing students are at risk of adopting stereotypical views about this section of the population as frail and dependent. Design., A pre- and post-test design was used to conduct the study. Methods., Using Kogan's Attitudes Towards Old People Scale, the attitudes of nursing students were tested at the beginning of a degree programme in Adult Nursing (n = 130) and one year later (n = 94) following a series of visits to a well-older person in the community. Results., Nursing students reported positive attitudes towards older people and these were retained throughout the first year of their nurse training. No statistically significant differences were found associated with any of the five independent variables in either pre- or postintervention students. Conclusions., The attitudes of nursing students towards older people remained positive. While it is possible that the experiential and educational interventions utilized in this study may have contributed to the retention of positive attitudes, further research is required to test this hypothesis. Relevance to clinical practice., Nurses have a major role to play in responding to the health and social care needs of older people and their families. The cultivation of positive attitudes is a key factor in enabling practising nurses to respond to this challenge. [source]


    Clinical Learning Environment Inventory: factor analysis

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 6 2010
    Jennifer M. Newton
    newton j.m., jolly b.c., ockerby c.m. & cross w.m. (2010) Clinical Learning Environment Inventory: factor analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing,66(6), 1371,1381. Abstract Title.,Clinical Learning Environment Inventory: factor analysis. Aim., This paper is a report of the psychometric testing of the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. Background., The clinical learning environment is a complex socio-cultural entity that offers a variety of opportunities to engage or disengage in learning. The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory is a self-report instrument consisting of 42 items classified into six scales: personalization, student involvement, task orientation, innovation, satisfaction and individualization. It was developed to examine undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of the learning environment whilst on placement in clinical settings. Method., As a component of a longitudinal project, Bachelor of Nursing students (n = 659) from two campuses of a university in Australia, completed the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory from 2006 to 2008. Principal components analysis using varimax rotation was conducted to explore the factor structure of the inventory. Results., Data for 513 students (77%) were eligible for inclusion. Constraining data to a 6-factor solution explained 51% of the variance. The factors identified were: student-centredness, affordances and engagement, individualization, fostering workplace learning, valuing nurses' work, and innovative and adaptive workplace culture. These factors were reviewed against recent theoretical developments in the literature. Conclusion., The study offers an empirically based and theoretically informed extension of the original Clinical Learning Environment Inventory, which had previously relied on ad hoc clustering of items and the use of internal reliability of its sub-scales. Further research is required to establish the consistency of these new factors. [source]


    Stress and health in novice and experienced nursing students

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 2 2010
    Cristobal Jimenez
    jimenez c., navia-osorio p.m. & diaz c.v. (2010) Stress and health in novice and experienced nursing students. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(2), 442,455. Abstract Title.,Stress and health in novice and experienced nursing students Aim., This paper is a report of a study conducted to identify the differences in novice and experienced nursing students' reports of stress and health. Background., Stress from clinical practice and its impact are international yet culturally mediated phenomena. Nursing students are under considerable stress during clinical practice periods, putting their education and health at risk. However, there is little or no empirical evidence about the stress suffered by nursing students and its impact on their health throughout clinical practice. Methods., We performed cross-sectional research using standard information gathering tools. This study was carried out with 357 students from all 3 years of a nursing diploma programme at a Spanish nursing college (71% response rate). The data were collected over an 8-month period in 2004,2005. Findings., We identified three types of stressors (clinical, academic and external) and two categories of symptoms (physiological and psychological) linked to clinical practice. Factor analysis identified six major sources of stress and six important symptoms. Students perceived clinical stressors more intensely than academic and external stressors, and showed psychological symptoms more frequently than physiological symptoms. Nursing students from all 3 years perceived moderate stress at similar levels. Experienced students perceived more academic stressors than novices. Although the students were healthy, second year students were the most vulnerable to somatic and psychic anxiety, and common symptoms. Conclusion., We suggest informing students about possible stressors associated with their profession, and introducing interventions to support development of professionalism, social skills and coping capacity for clinical practice. [source]


    Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 11 2009
    Li-Ling Hsu
    Abstract Title.,Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies. Aim. This paper is a report of a study to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale for baccalaureate nursing students. Background. Baccalaureate nursing students receive basic nursing education and continue to build competency in practice settings after graduation. Nursing students today face great challenges. Society demands analytic, critical, reflective and transformative attitudes from graduates. It also demands that institutions of higher education take the responsibility to encourage students, through academic work, to acquire knowledge and skills that meet the needs of the modern workplace, which favours highly skilled and qualified workers. Methods. A survey of 802 senior nursing students in their last semester at college or university was conducted in Taiwan in 2007 using the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale. Half of the participants were randomly assigned either to principal components analysis with varimax rotation or confirmatory factor analysis. Results. Principal components analysis revealed two components of core competencies that were named as humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. The initial model of confirmatory factor analysis was then converged to an acceptable solution but did not show a good fit; however, the final model of confirmatory factor analysis was converged to an acceptable solution with acceptable fit. The final model has two components, namely humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. Both components have four indicators. In addition, six indicators have their correlated measurement errors. Conclusion. Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale could be used to assess the core competencies of undergraduate nursing students. In addition, it should be used as a teaching guide to increase students' competencies to ensure quality patient care in hospitals. [source]


    Child disability case studies: an interprofessional learning opportunity for medical students and paediatric nursing students

    MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 8 2007
    Karen N Street
    Context, We describe an interprofessional learning (IPL) opportunity for pre-qualification medical and paediatric nursing students using community-based case studies of disabled children and their families. Methods, A total of 160 students were randomly allocated into interprofessional and uniprofessional pairs. Each pair visited a disabled child at home and school and presented their experience to the rest of the group. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods were used to explore the learning experience. Data collection tools included a scale measuring attitudes towards IPL, which was completed by all students before and after their visits and focus groups. Results, The value of the community setting and independent working of the case study was appreciated by the students. The intimacy involved in working in IP pairs demonstrated both positive and negative features. Nursing students showed more open and positive attitudes towards IPL than medical students. Nursing students in IP pairs appear to have benefited most from the exercise, notably in terms of confidence and self-esteem. Professional differences in communication skills and approach were identified as particular learning points for all students. Conclusions, The added value of combining quantitative and qualitative research methods is well demonstrated by this study. Learning opportunities from the case study were greater as a result of working interprofessionally. Student attitudes towards IPL and professional stereotyping changed as a result of this IPL exercise. The importance of the social context of learning and the contact hypothesis are supported by our findings. [source]


    Loss of income and levels of scholarship support for students on rural clinical placements: A survey of medical, nursing and allied health students

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 3 2009
    Deborah Schofield
    Abstract Objective:,To quantify the financial impact of rural clinical placements on medical, nursing and allied health students in rural Australia. Design:,The Careers in Health Tracking Survey provided data on whether students were employed, usual weekly hours of employment and a range of covariates, such as age, sex, course of study, marital status, dependants and rural or urban origin. Participants:,A total of 121 students from a range of health professions completed the Careers in Health Tracking Survey while on rural placement at the Northern Rivers University Department of Rural Health. Outcome measures:,Survey data. Results:,Forty-one per cent of respondents were working immediately before their clinical placements. Nursing students worked the longest hours by far and were significantly more financially disadvantaged than both medical and allied health students (P < 0.01). Scholarship support was unevenly distributed, with nursing and allied health students being relatively under-supported in relation to lost earnings. Conclusion:,Recruitment of students can be an effective strategy to address the rural health workforce shortage throughout Australia. However, there are a number of financial disincentives for students to undertake rural clinical placements. Additional support for some disciplines is needed to provide equitable distribution of scholarship support to offset this financial burden. Establishing an employment scheme for students on rural clinical placements and a scholarship for income replacement where employment is not available would also alleviate income loss. [source]


    An analysis of narratives to identify critical thinking contexts in psychiatric clinical practice

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 1 2010
    Mi Suk Mun PhD RN
    Mun MS. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2010; 16: 75,80 An analysis of narratives to identify critical thinking contexts in psychiatric clinical practice The development of students' critical thinking abilities is one of the greatest challenges facing contemporary nursing educators. Nursing educators should know about what kind of contents or situations need critical thinking. The research was undertaken to identify the critical thinking contexts that nursing students confront in psychiatric clinical practices. Students were asked to document their everyday experience. The narratives were analysed and interpreted from the philosophical notion of hermeneutics. Four themes emerged as critical thinking contexts: anxiety, conflict, hyper-awareness, dilemmas. Writing narratives appear to provide opportunities for reflection in addition to facilitating critical thinking and communicative skills in students. Also, for the instructor, students' clinical narratives could provide insight to understand how students are thinking and to share student's personal difficulties. [source]


    Study abroad as a process of learning intercultural competence in nursing

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 3 2004
    Liisa Koskinen RN PhD
    The aim of this research was to describe an international student exchange programme as a context of learning intercultural competence in nursing. Twelve Finnish nursing students who had participated in an exchange programme in the United Kingdom participated. The data consisted of group interviews, learning documents, background questionnaires and research diary notes, and the method of inductive content analysis was used. Study abroad as a process of learning intercultural competence consisted of three ethno-categories: transition from one culture to another, adjustment to the difference and gaining intercultural sensitivity. The exchange programme as a context of learning intercultural competence was characterized by a problematic orientation phase, a study abroad phase that involved stressful but rewarding adjustment to the intercultural differences and an inadequate re-entry debriefing phase. In order for the international experience of nursing students to have an impact on their understanding of diversity, they need assistance in each phase of the programme. Particularly, the students need intercultural tutoring and mentoring to venture into encounters with local people, including direct client contacts, during their study abroad. [source]


    Developing a questionnaire to measure nurses' attitudes towards hospitalized older people

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 2 2007
    Dip N. (C.T) Dip., Ella McLafferty PhD
    A number of studies have used generic measures to evaluate nurses' attitudes toward hospitalized older people. Those measures do not consider the context in which nurses meet older people and the influence that this may have on nurses' attitudes. The aims and objectives of the study were to develop a questionnaire from focus group data to evaluate nurses' attitudes towards hospitalized older people. To evaluate the psychometric properties of the questionnaire the design included a qualitative and quantitative phase. The method used for the qualitative phase was focus group interviews with the intention of identifying the phenomena that may indicate nurses' attitudes towards older people. The quantitative phase included the development and psychometric testing of an attitudinal questionnaire. Samples for the qualitative phase included Registered Nurses from the care of older people setting; Registered Nurses from the acute setting; nursing students and nurse teachers. The sample for the quantitative phase included nursing students (numbering 355). Ten themes were identified through thematic analysis. Eighty items were extrapolated from the qualitative analysis and used to formulate a questionnaire which was then distributed to the nursing students. On analysis, the reliability was 0.78. Further analysis using Principal Components Analysis (P.C.A.) with orthogonal rotation indicated that 45 items loaded on to eight factors. Results of the quantitative analysis indicated that there was a strong correlation between the thematic analysis and the P.C.A. The results would suggest that there may be important and relevant domains that are worthy of further study into nurses' attitudes towards older people. If the domains identified are useful for identifying negative attitudes towards older people, then strategies can be implemented to try and reduce negative attitudes in clinical practice. [source]


    Developing a valid and reliable self-efficacy in clinical performance scale

    INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Issue 2 2009
    F. Cheraghi phd
    Aim:, This paper describes the development and testing of the Self-Efficacy in Clinical Performance (SECP) instrument for nursing students. Background:, Accurate measurement of self-efficacy can be used to predict nursing students' clinical performance. The literature review indicated there is no existing self-efficacy in clinical performance instrument for Iranian nursing students. Methods:, To clarify the concept of self-efficacy in clinical performance, 28 semi-structured interviews and three focus groups were conducted. A self-efficacy framework with well-developed theoretical constructs was formed. A review of literature and content analysis of the interview transcripts identified subscales and items to be included in the instrument. Then, a methodological design was used. The SECP was developed into 69 Likert-format items, which were evaluated by 20 nursing experts in the form of content validity index. The scale's validity and reliability were tested in a randomized sample of 207 final year nursing students. Findings:, The final scale consists of four dimensions with 37 items. The overall scale internal reliability had , = 0.96; the dimensions Cronbach's , ranged from 0.90 to 0.92. Test,retest reliability with a 2-week time interval was: r = 0.94. In addition, concurrent validity was obtained (r = 0.73, P = 0.01). Conclusions:, The SECP has demonstrated evidence of content validity, construct validity, concurrent validity, internal consistency reliability and stability. Statistical analysis provided an objective tool for assessing nursing students' self-efficacy in clinical performance. It may have been fruitful to further test the instrument with students from other years of their education. [source]


    Jordanian baccalaureate nursing students' perception of their learning styles

    INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Issue 1 2005
    F. A. Abu-Moghli rn
    Aim:, The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine Jordanian nursing students' perception of their learning styles. Method:, All nursing students enrolled in four universities offering a baccalaureate degree in nursing at the time of the research project (n = 420) were approached. A structured self-administered questionnaire (Autonomous Learner Index) developed by the researchers was used for data collection. The questionnaire was pilot tested on a sample of nursing students who were not included in the study. The tool was reliable with an alpha coefficient of 0.89. Findings:, The majority of Jordanian nursing students perceived themselves as independent learners. The vast majority of students indicated that they have a desire to learn new things, are curious to learn, and can identify their goal independently. However, a low percentage of students indicated having good study skills, ability to concentrate while studying and using their study time efficiently. The two-tailed t -test indicated no significant differences at alpha 0.05 levels between students' learning preferences and the selected demographic variables. Conclusion:, Based on the study findings, it is suggested that nurse educators should provide positive reinforcement of students' active involvement in the learning process, which will stimulate continued self-direction. Moreover, courses on study skills, writing skills, and literature searching skills should be introduced early in nursing curricula. [source]


    Strategies for teaching nursing research online

    INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Issue 2 2004
    P. Moore RN
    Abstract Background:, Nursing, like many disciplines in university settings, is experiencing increasing demand for online courses. Development and implementation of online courses with the quality of education nursing students experience in traditional classroom settings, is essential to maintaining integrity of the educational process. Nursing research has been offered in the online format in the RN-BSN programme for 2 years. This course has an average enrolment of 80 to 90 students each semester. Purpose:, This article presents strategies used in teaching an RN-BSN nursing research course online. Conclusions:, Feedback from faculty and students indicates that these strategies have been successful in facilitating this writing intensive course through distance learning. [source]


    Learning to Support Children With Complex and Continuing Health Needs and Their Families

    JOURNAL FOR SPECIALISTS IN PEDIATRIC NURSING, Issue 2 2007
    Helen Farasat
    PURPOSE.,This paper reports on the evaluation of a pilot placement for preregistration child health nursing students focused on supporting children with complex needs in their homes. CONCLUSIONS.,This type of placement can be beneficial in enabling students to develop practical skills, attitudes, and values that will assist them to provide appropriate support for this client group. The pilot placement clarified some of the major organizational and practical issues that must be considered. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS.,Developing opportunities for preregistration nursing students to learn to support children with complex needs and their families is possible and potentially beneficial. [source]


    Experiences of Students in Pediatric Nursing Clinical Courses

    JOURNAL FOR SPECIALISTS IN PEDIATRIC NURSING, Issue 2 2001
    Marilyn H. Oermann
    ISSUES AND PURPOSE. Learning may be inhibited if students experience undue stress in the clinical setting. This study described the stresses, challenges, and emotions experienced by pediatric nursing students. DESIGN AND METHODS. Students (n = 75) completed a modified Pagana Clinical Stress Questionnaire at the end of their pediatric nursing clinical course. The comparison group of students (n = 383) was enrolled in nonpediatric clinical courses in the same nursing programs. RESULTS. The most stressful aspect of clinical practice was giving medications to children. High stress scores were related to more fear and disappointment in clinical practice. Students who experienced high stress were less stimulated by their clinical activities and developed less confidence in practice. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS. Knowledge of students' perceptions of clinical stress can help educators and clinicians promote a positive and rewarding clinical atmosphere. [source]


    Spiritual health, clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 7 2010
    Ya-Chu Hsiao
    hsiao y.-c., chien l.-y., wu l.-y., chiang c.-m. & huang s.-y. (2010) Spiritual health, clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students. Journal of Advanced Nursing,66(7), 1612,1622. Abstract Title.,Spiritual health, clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students. Aim., This paper is a report of an exploration of the association of spiritual health with clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students. Background., Several studies in western countries have demonstrated an association between spirituality and health. Spirituality-related research in eastern countries, however, is still in its infancy. Methods., A cross-sectional design was adopted and structured questionnaires were used for data collection. We adopted the Probability Proportional to Size cluster sampling method to recruit nursing students in senior grades. Data were collected in 2005 using the Spiritual Health Scale, Perceived Clinical Practice Stress Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-II and Health Promotion Behaviours Scale. Results., A total of 1276 nursing students with an average age of 201 years (sd = 16 years) participated in the study. Spiritual health was negatively associated with clinical practice stress (r = ,0211, P < 0001) and depressive tendency (r = ,0324, P < 0001) and positively associated with health-promoting behaviours (r = 0611, P < 0001). Using hierarchical regression analysis to control for demographic factors, spiritual health was found to be an important predictive factor for clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours. Conclusion., These results are consistent with research findings from western countries. Educators should develop strategies to address nursing students' spiritual health. This may help nursing students to manage their stress, to reduce depressive symptoms and to enhance health-promoting behaviours. [source]


    Stress and health in novice and experienced nursing students

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 2 2010
    Cristobal Jimenez
    jimenez c., navia-osorio p.m. & diaz c.v. (2010) Stress and health in novice and experienced nursing students. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(2), 442,455. Abstract Title.,Stress and health in novice and experienced nursing students Aim., This paper is a report of a study conducted to identify the differences in novice and experienced nursing students' reports of stress and health. Background., Stress from clinical practice and its impact are international yet culturally mediated phenomena. Nursing students are under considerable stress during clinical practice periods, putting their education and health at risk. However, there is little or no empirical evidence about the stress suffered by nursing students and its impact on their health throughout clinical practice. Methods., We performed cross-sectional research using standard information gathering tools. This study was carried out with 357 students from all 3 years of a nursing diploma programme at a Spanish nursing college (71% response rate). The data were collected over an 8-month period in 2004,2005. Findings., We identified three types of stressors (clinical, academic and external) and two categories of symptoms (physiological and psychological) linked to clinical practice. Factor analysis identified six major sources of stress and six important symptoms. Students perceived clinical stressors more intensely than academic and external stressors, and showed psychological symptoms more frequently than physiological symptoms. Nursing students from all 3 years perceived moderate stress at similar levels. Experienced students perceived more academic stressors than novices. Although the students were healthy, second year students were the most vulnerable to somatic and psychic anxiety, and common symptoms. Conclusion., We suggest informing students about possible stressors associated with their profession, and introducing interventions to support development of professionalism, social skills and coping capacity for clinical practice. [source]


    Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure: psychometric testing with Chinese nursing students

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 12 2009
    Jian Wang
    Abstract Title.,Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure: psychometric testing with Chinese nursing students. Aim., This paper is a report of the psychometric testing of the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure with Chinese nursing students. Background., Although the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure has been widely used to measure educational environments in the healthcare professions, no psychometric evaluation of the measure with Chinese nursing students has been reported. Method., Data from 214 nursing students were collected during a 2-month period between December, 2004 and January, 2005. Exploratory factor analysis, internal consistency reliability and Cronbach's alpha were examined. Results., Five factors were found by principal components analysis with Oblimin with Kaiser Normalization rotation. The original factor names were maintained, but items in each factor changed. These five factors all achieved eigenvalues >1, and in total accounted for 52186% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0623 to 09 across factors, with an overall alpha of 0949. Conclusion., The Chinese version of the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure could be a valuable measurement for nursing educators in professional development programmes and nursing curriculum design. Further studies need in different Chinese nursing schools and larger sample sizes to be conducted to validate its stability and factor structure. [source]


    Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 11 2009
    Li-Ling Hsu
    Abstract Title.,Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies. Aim. This paper is a report of a study to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale for baccalaureate nursing students. Background. Baccalaureate nursing students receive basic nursing education and continue to build competency in practice settings after graduation. Nursing students today face great challenges. Society demands analytic, critical, reflective and transformative attitudes from graduates. It also demands that institutions of higher education take the responsibility to encourage students, through academic work, to acquire knowledge and skills that meet the needs of the modern workplace, which favours highly skilled and qualified workers. Methods. A survey of 802 senior nursing students in their last semester at college or university was conducted in Taiwan in 2007 using the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale. Half of the participants were randomly assigned either to principal components analysis with varimax rotation or confirmatory factor analysis. Results. Principal components analysis revealed two components of core competencies that were named as humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. The initial model of confirmatory factor analysis was then converged to an acceptable solution but did not show a good fit; however, the final model of confirmatory factor analysis was converged to an acceptable solution with acceptable fit. The final model has two components, namely humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. Both components have four indicators. In addition, six indicators have their correlated measurement errors. Conclusion. Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale could be used to assess the core competencies of undergraduate nursing students. In addition, it should be used as a teaching guide to increase students' competencies to ensure quality patient care in hospitals. [source]


    Evidence-based practice-focused interactive teaching strategy: a controlled study

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 6 2009
    Son C. Kim
    Abstract Title.,Evidence-based practice-focused interactive teaching strategy: a controlled study. Aim., This paper is a report of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the evidence-based practice (EBP)-focused interactive teaching (E-FIT) strategy. Background., Although EBP is a mandatory competency for all healthcare professionals, little is known about the effectiveness of E-FIT in nursing. Methods., A quasi-experimental, controlled, pre- and post-test study involving senior, 4th-year nursing students (N = 208) at two nursing schools in the USA was carried out from August 2007 to May 2008. The experimental group (n = 88) received the E-FIT strategy intervention and the control group (n = 120) received standard teaching. A Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors Questionnaire for Evidence-Based Practice was used to assess the effectiveness of the E-FIT strategy. Results., Independent t -tests showed that the experimental group had statistically significant higher post-test Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge (mean difference = 025; P = 0001) and Evidence-Based Practice Use (mean difference = 026; P = 0015) subscale scores compared to the control group, but showed no statistically significant differences in Attitudes toward Evidence-Based Practice and Future Use of Evidence-Based Practice (mean difference = ,012; P = 0398 and mean difference = 013; P = 0255 respectively). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses of the post-test data indicated that the intervention explained 76% and 51% of variance in Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge and Evidence-Based Practice Use respectively. Conclusion., The EBP-focused interactive teaching strategy was effective in improving the knowledge and use of EBP among nursing students but not attitudes toward or future use of EBP. [source]


    Index of sources of stress in nursing students: a confirmatory factor analysis

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 5 2009
    Chris Gibbons
    Abstract Title.,Index of sources of stress in nursing students: a confirmatory factor analysis. Aim., This paper is a report of a study to test the proposed factor structure of the Index of Sources of Stress in Nursing Students. Background., Research across many countries has identified a number of sources of distress in nursing students but little attempt has been made to understand and measure sources of eustress or those stressors likely to enhance performance and well-being. The Index of Sources of Stress in Nursing Students was developed to do this. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a three-factor structure, the factors being labelled: learning and teaching; placement-related and course organization. It is important, however, to subject the instrument to confirmatory factor analysis as a further test of construct validity. Method., A convenience sample of final year nursing students (n = 176) was surveyed in one university in Northern Ireland in 2007. The Index of Sources of Stress in Nursing Students, which measures sources of stress likely to contribute to distress and eustress, was completed electronically. The lisrel programme was used to carry out the confirmatory factor analysis and test the factor structure suggested in the exploratory analysis. Findings., The proposed factor structure for the items measuring ,Uplifts' proved to be a good fit to the data and the proposed factor structure for the items measuring ,Hassles' showed adequate fit. Conclusion., In nursing programmes adopting the academic model and combining university-based learning with placement experience, this instrument can be used to help identify the sources of stress or course demands that students rate as distressing and those that help them to achieve. The validity of the ISSN could be further evaluated in other education settings. [source]


    Stages of Change , Continuous Measure (URICA-E2): psychometrics of a Norwegian version

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 1 2009
    Anners Lerdal
    Abstract Title.,Stages of Change , Continuous Measure (URICA-E2): psychometrics of a Norwegian version. Aim., This paper is a report of research to translate the English version of the Stages of Change continuous measure questionnaire (URICA-E2) into Norwegian and to test the validity of the questionnaire and its usefulness in predicting behavioural change. Background., While the psychometric properties of the Stages of Change categorical measure have been tested extensively, evaluation of the psychometric properties of the continuous questionnaire has not been described elsewhere in the literature. Method., Cross-sectional data were collected with a convenience sample of 198 undergraduate nursing students in 2005 and 2006. The English version of URICA-E2 was translated into Norwegian according to standardized procedures. Findings., Principal components analysis clearly confirmed five of the dimensions of readiness to change (Precontemplation Non-Believers, Precontemplation Believers, Contemplation, Preparation and Maintenance), while the sixth dimension, Action, showed the lowest Eigenvalue (093). Findings from the cluster analysis indicate distinct profiles among the respondents in terms of readiness to change their exercise behaviour. Conclusion., The URICA-E2 was for the most part replicated from Reed's original work. The result of the cluster analysis of the items associated with the factor ,Action' suggests that these do not adequately measure the factor. [source]


    Nursing students' perceptions of the importance of caring behaviors

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 4 2008
    Zahra Khademian
    Abstract Title.,Nursing students' perceptions of the importance of caring behaviours Aim., This paper is a report of a study to determine the nursing students' perceptions of the importance of caring behaviours. Background., Caring has been considered as the essence of nursing. It is believed that caring enhances patients' health and well-being and facilitates health promotion. Nursing education has an important role in educating the nurses with adequate caring abilities. Method., Ninety nursing students (response rate 75%) responded to a questionnaire consisting of 55 caring behaviours adapted from items on Caring Assessment Questionnaire (Care-Q). Behaviours were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale. The caring behaviours were categorized in seven subscales: ,accessibles', ,monitors and follows through', ,explains and facilitates', ,comforts', ,anticipates', ,trusting relationship' and ,spiritual care'. Data were collected in Iran in 2003. Findings., The students perceived ,monitors and follows through' (mean = 433, SD = 060) as the most and ,trusting relationship' (mean = 370, SD = 062) as the least important subscales. ,To give patient's treatments and medications on time' and ,to do voluntarily little things,' were the most and least important caring behaviours, respectively. ,Explains and facilitates' statistically and significantly correlated with age (r = 031, P = 0003) and programme year (r = 028, P = 0025). Gender had no statistically significant influence on students' perceptions of caring behaviours. Conclusion., Further research is needed, using longitudinal designs, to explore nursing students' perceptions of caring behaviours in different cultures, as well as evaluation studies of innovations in curriculum and teaching methods to improve learning in relation to cultural competence and caring concepts. [source]


    Critical thinking dispositions in baccalaureate nursing students

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 2 2006
    Kyung Rim Shin EdD RN FAAN
    Aim., This paper reports an investigation into the critical thinking disposition of students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing programme at a university in Korea. Background., Critical thinking may be summarized as a skilled process that conceptualizes and applies information from observation, experience, reflection, inference and communication in a technical manner. It is more of a rational act used as an instrument rather than as a result. Critical thinking is a core competency in nursing and has been widely discussed in nursing education. However, the results of previous research on the effectiveness of nursing education in improving students' critical thinking have been inconsistent. Methods., A longitudinal design was used with a convenience sample of 60 nursing students; 32 students participated four times in completing a questionnaire each March from 1999 to 2002. The California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory was administered to measure disposition to critical thinking. Results., There was a statistically significant improvement in critical thinking disposition score by academic year (F = 754, P = 00001). Among the subscales, open-mindedness, self-confidence, and maturity also showed a statistically significant difference by academic year (P = 00194, 00041, 00044). Conclusion., Teaching strategies to enhance critical thinking should be developed, in addition to further research on the effect of the nursing curriculum on students' critical thinking. Moreover, survey instruments could be adjusted to incorporate characteristics of the Korean culture. [source]