Nursing Programs (nursing + program)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The healing power of reflective writing for a student victim of sexual assault

JOURNAL OF FORENSIC NURSING, Issue 2 2009
Karen A. Karlowicz EdD
Abstract The phenomenon of a caring relationship between a teacher and her student, a victim of sexual assault, is mediated through reflective writing assignments in a baccalaureate nursing program. Increased self-awareness, personal transformation, and healing results when the student is encouraged to openly write about her feelings. [source]


Using Family History to Assess Women's Cancer Risk in a Parish Nurse Setting

NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, Issue 2 2006
Carol Cherry
This health promotion project fulfillled required field study in a graduate public health nursing program. Family history, an important risk factor for many chronic diseases including cancer, is gaining importance as a public health tool. The author used cancer risk assessment expertise to assess women's cancer risk based on family history in two parish settings. Women completed cancer family history using the U.S. Surgeon General's Family Health Portrait. They received pedigree, tailored risk communication and educational materials for cancer prevention/detection. Of 23 women, the majority reported intention to: (i) change behavior to reduce risk; (ii) change screening practice; and (iii) share family history with healthcare providers. One woman at high risk sought formal genetic counseling. Risk information was based on family history only, although multiple factors affect risk. Women's intention to change behavior may not lead to actual change. Population was homogeneous and well educated so results may not be generalizable to other populations. Even though most parish nurses would not have expertise in cancer risk assessment, they can advocate use of the Family Health Portrait. Women respond positively to personalized risk feedback presented in the context of their faith communities. The project facilitated genomic understanding within a public health setting. [source]


Community Based and Community Focused: Nursing Education in Community Health

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2000
Cheryl Feenstra Ph.D., R.N.C.
Nurses have always cared for individuals, families, groups, and communities in their practice. Recently there has been an increase in the focus on nurses working outside of the hospital, primarily in community-based settings that focus on individuals and families. There is also increasing emphasis on community-focused nursing care with the community as the client. In some nursing programs, nurse educators have tried to adjust to this change by increasing the amount of time that nursing students spend in the community. The focus of this experience ranges from individuals to populations. This article describes a one-semester community health course in a baccalaureate nursing program that gives students both theoretical and practical knowledge in caring for individuals, families, groups, and communities. This allows for practice and understanding of both community-based and community-focused nursing care. [source]


Experiences of Students in Pediatric Nursing Clinical Courses

JOURNAL FOR SPECIALISTS IN PEDIATRIC NURSING, Issue 2 2001
Marilyn H. Oermann
ISSUES AND PURPOSE. Learning may be inhibited if students experience undue stress in the clinical setting. This study described the stresses, challenges, and emotions experienced by pediatric nursing students. DESIGN AND METHODS. Students (n = 75) completed a modified Pagana Clinical Stress Questionnaire at the end of their pediatric nursing clinical course. The comparison group of students (n = 383) was enrolled in nonpediatric clinical courses in the same nursing programs. RESULTS. The most stressful aspect of clinical practice was giving medications to children. High stress scores were related to more fear and disappointment in clinical practice. Students who experienced high stress were less stimulated by their clinical activities and developed less confidence in practice. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS. Knowledge of students' perceptions of clinical stress can help educators and clinicians promote a positive and rewarding clinical atmosphere. [source]


An exploratory study of forensic nursing education in North America: Constructed definitions of forensic nursing

JOURNAL OF FORENSIC NURSING, Issue 4 2009
Arlene Kent-Wilkinson RN
Abstract The aim of this study was to explore forensic nursing knowledge as a specialty area of study, and factors influencing its educational development. A purposeful sample of nurse educators who had established some of the earliest forensic nursing programs in North America were sought for their perspective to answer predominantly qualitative questions. Unexpected findings from this study resulted in the concept of forensic nursing being described, differentiated, and defined. Since the inception of forensic nursing, numerous definitions have been written to articulate the knowledge of the specialty. The constructed definitions of forensic nursing from this study not only validated prior definitions developed by individuals and associations by nonresearchable methods, but also led to a discussion of what concepts are important to include in definitions of forensic nursing. [source]


Leadership Styles and Nursing Faculty Job Satisfaction in Taiwan

JOURNAL OF NURSING SCHOLARSHIP, Issue 4 2005
Hsiu-Chin Chen
Purpose: To examine nursing faculty job satisfaction and their perceptions of nursing deans' and directors' leadership styles, and to explore how the perceptions of leadership styles relate to faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan. Methods: Descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. The sample was recruited from 18 nursing programs, and 286 questionnaires were returned. Results: Faculty perceived that Taiwan's nursing deans and directors showed more transformational than transactional leadership. Taiwan's nursing faculty were moderately satisfied in their jobs, and they were more satisfied with deans or directors who practiced the transactional leadership style of contingent reward and the transformational style of individualized consideration. A style with negative effect was passive management by exception. Conclusions: Three types of leadership behaviors explained significant variance (21.2%) in faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan, indicating the need for further attention to training and development for effective leadership behaviors. [source]


Study of Gerontological Nursing Curriculum

NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, Issue 3 2002
S.J. Chon
The purpose of this study was: (i) to survey the present status of the gerontological nursing course in 3-year diploma programs, baccalaureate degree programs (BSN), and graduate programs in Korea; and (ii) to analyze the contents of the syllabus, credits, clinical practise, and gerontological nursing textbooks used within these programs, so as to provide basic data for developing a standard model for a gerontological nursing curriculum. Primary data were collected from all the nursing programs in Korea, from November 2000 to February 2001, by way of mail and fax. Data on the detailed contents of the gerontological nursing curriculum were collected from those programs that had a gerontological nursing course. The results of the study revealed that 36 diploma programs (58%), 40 BSN (80%), and 17 graduate programs (63%) offered gerontological nursing courses. The credits of the gerontological nursing course offered, by program, were found to be: one credit (10 diploma programs, eight BSN programs), two credits (22 diploma programs, 29 BSN programs) and three credits (one BSN program). The gerontological nursing courses were found to be taught mostly by adult health nursing professors. The contents of gerontological nursing curricula were analyzed by comparison with the core curriculum of NGNA. The majority of the nursing schools were found to include the following: gerontological nursing in general; theory of aging; aging processes; care plan options; and common health problems. Legal/ethical issues; evaluation; regulatory and reimbursement issues; education issues; nursing research in gerontology; and environment issues of older adults were not covered in most of the programs. Differences were noted between ADN, BSN, and graduate school curricula. However, similar curriculum contents were found among the undergraduate programs, suggesting that these curricula used gerontological nursing textbooks as references. [source]


Globalization of tertiary nursing education in post-Mao China: A preliminary qualitative assessment

NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, Issue 4 2001
Zhaomin Xu RN
Abstract This article examines China's collaborative initiatives with Western countries to assess the impact of globalization on Chinese nursing education, especially at the post-secondary level, in the post-Mao era. Through the theoretical framework of mutuality, it evaluates the outcomes of globalization in two broad domains: pedagogy and system-institution-program building. In addition, case studies on two collaborative projects between Chinese nursing programs and Western institutions were conducted to further illustrate the principles of mutuality. This qualitative assessment is primarily based on a systematic review of published studies on the multifaceted dimensions of globalization in Chinese post-secondary nursing education in both English and Chinese nursing literature since 1990. It is supplemented by unpublished documents and data obtained from a research trip to China in 2000. The study concludes that globalization has been, and will remain, one of the major forces underpinning Chinese nursing education (and the nursing profession in general), which is moving towards integration into the global nursing community. However, there is a significant imbalance in the knowledge transfer equation both in the national and international context. Great efforts need to be made to synthesize nursing knowledge in the East and West to achieve an integrative nursing science. [source]


Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry-Level Community/Public Health Nursing

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2010
Education Committee of the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators
ABSTRACT Community/public health nursing (C/PHN) educators and practitioners need a framework from which to plan, implement, and evaluate curriculum and community-based practice. The Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE) periodically updates the Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry Level Community/Public Health Nursing to reflect changes in core knowledge, basic competencies, and practice. This update reflects relevance to 21st-century health care and to national trends influencing nursing education. The 2009 revision is based on critical analysis of key C/PHN literature and input from public health nursing educators and practitioners. A key assumption is that a baccalaureate nursing degree is the minimum requirement for professional C/PHN. Fifteen essential concepts for baccalaureate nursing education are delineated along with related competencies. Newly defined essentials include communication, social justice, and emergency preparedness, response, and recovery. Issues related to didactic and clinical experiences are addressed. The ACHNE Essentials is an important guide for baccalaureate education curriculum planning and evaluation. The Essentials may be useful as a baseline from which to develop competencies of graduate nursing programs. The document is also useful for guiding practice setting orientation and professional development. [source]


Parish Nursing: Nurturing Body, Mind, Spirit, and Community

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2003
Ingrid Brudenell R.N., Ph.D.
Abstract Parish nursing is a model of nursing care that focuses on health promotion and disease prevention within a faith community. A descriptive study was conducted in the intermountain West to determine how faith communities form parish nursing programs and what their effect is. Thirteen congregations representing eight denominations with parish nurse/health ministries participated. Parish nurses, parish nurse coordinators from two medical centers, pastors, and hospital chaplains (n = 24) were interviewed and provided documents from their programs. Over time, congregations formed parish nursing/health ministries using strategies in a developmental process. The process involved significant support from the pastor, congregation members, and the parish nurses. Collaboration between faith communities and health organizations were successful using a limited domain approach to attain specific health goals. Parish nursing is making a contribution to integrating faith and health practices, promoting health, and increasing accessibility to health care and congregational activities. Conclusions and recommendations are included for future research, practice, and education. [source]


Community Based and Community Focused: Nursing Education in Community Health

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2000
Cheryl Feenstra Ph.D., R.N.C.
Nurses have always cared for individuals, families, groups, and communities in their practice. Recently there has been an increase in the focus on nurses working outside of the hospital, primarily in community-based settings that focus on individuals and families. There is also increasing emphasis on community-focused nursing care with the community as the client. In some nursing programs, nurse educators have tried to adjust to this change by increasing the amount of time that nursing students spend in the community. The focus of this experience ranges from individuals to populations. This article describes a one-semester community health course in a baccalaureate nursing program that gives students both theoretical and practical knowledge in caring for individuals, families, groups, and communities. This allows for practice and understanding of both community-based and community-focused nursing care. [source]