Nursing Phenomena (nursing + phenomenon)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Husserl and Heidegger: Exploring the disparity

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 1 2009
Tracy McConnell-Henry RN BN GDN (Critical Care) MHSc (Nse Ed) PhD candidate MRCNA
Introduced as an alternative to empirical science, phenomenology offers nursing an insightful means for understanding nursing phenomena specifically in relation to lived experiences. However, not all phenomenologies were created equal, a point which has left many a nursing researcher not only confused. Furthermore, this confusion might result in the choosing of a philosophical framework that is neither cognizant with the research question nor the epistemological lens through which the researcher operates. Drawing on common nursing examples to illustrate concepts, the authors closely examine and debate the disparities between Husserl's transcendental phenomenology and Heidegger's hermeneutic approach to phenomenology. The aim of the article is to demystify the dense language used and present the fundamental beliefs of each philosopher in a format that is accessible to novice phenomenologists. [source]


Standardized Care Planning: Evaluation of ICNP Beta in the Areas of Nutrition and Skin Care in a Practice Setting

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2003
Jan Florin
PURPOSE To evaluate completeness, granularity, multiple axial content, and clinical utility of the beta version of the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP®). METHODS Standardized care plans were developed based on research in the areas of nutrition and skin care and clinically tested in a 35-bed infectious disease unit at a Swedish university hospital. A convenience sample of 56 computerized and manual patient records were content analyzed and mapped to the terms in ICNP® beta. FINDINGS A total of 1,771 phrases were identified. Approximately 60% of the record content describing nursing phenomena and about one third of the nursing interventions in the areas of nutrition and skin care could be expressed satisfactorily using the terminology of ICNP® beta. For about 25% of the content describing both nursing phenomena and interventions, no corresponding term was found. The most common deficiencies were focus terms for stating patient perspective or collaboration, nonhuman focus, normal findings, more qualitative judgments, and different expressions for stating duration. Some terms are available in the ICNP beta as a whole, but the organization of axes impedes or restricts the use of terms beyond the ICNP categories. Terms needed to express nursing phenomena could sometimes be found in nursing actions axes. CONCLUSIONS The ICNP® beta needs to be further developed to capture relevant data in nursing care. The axial structure needs to be evaluated, and completeness and granularity of terms need to be addressed further before ICNP beta can be used on a daily basis in the clinical setting. Terms need to be developed to express patient participation and preferences, normal conditions, qualitative dimensions and characteristics, nonhuman focuses as well as duration. Empirical studies covering the complexity of information in nursing care are needed. [source]


Applicability of the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP®) in the Areas of Nutrition and Skin Care

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 1 2003
Margareta Ehnfors PhD
PURPOSE. To evaluate completeness, granularity, multiple axial content, and clinical utility of the beta version of the ICNP® in the context of standardized nursing care planning in a clinical setting. METHODS. An 35-bed acute care ward for infectious diseases at a Swedish university hospital was selected for clinical testing. A convenience sample of 56 patient records with data on nutrition and skin care was analyzed and mapped to the ICNP. FINDINGS. Using the ICNP terminology, 59%-62% of the record content describing nursing phenomena and 30%-44% of the nursing interventions in the areas of nutrition and skin care could be expressed satisfactorily. For about a quarter of the content describing nursing phenomena and interventions, no corresponding ICNP term was found. CONCLUSIONS. The ICNP needs to be further developed to allow representation of the entire range of nursing care. Terms need to be developed to express patient participation and preferences, normal conditions, qualitative dimensions and characteristics, nonhuman focus, and duration. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS. The practical usefulness of the ICNP needs further testing before conclusions about its clinical benefits can be determined. Search terms: ICNP®, nursing classification, standardized terminology, VIPS [source]