Nursing

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Nursing

  • advance nursing
  • arched-back nursing
  • care nursing
  • clinical nursing
  • community mental health nursing
  • community nursing
  • critical care nursing
  • forensic nursing
  • forensic psychiatric nursing
  • health nursing
  • mental health nursing
  • modern nursing
  • older people nursing
  • operating room nursing
  • parish nursing
  • people nursing
  • perioperative nursing
  • practice nursing
  • psychiatric nursing
  • public health nursing
  • room nursing
  • school nursing

  • Terms modified by Nursing

  • nursing action
  • nursing activity
  • nursing assessment
  • nursing assistant
  • nursing award
  • nursing care
  • nursing career
  • nursing competency
  • nursing concept
  • nursing contribution
  • nursing course
  • nursing curriculum
  • nursing degree
  • nursing development unit
  • nursing diagnosis
  • nursing discourse
  • nursing documentation
  • nursing education
  • nursing education program
  • nursing education programme
  • nursing educator
  • nursing ethics
  • nursing expert
  • nursing expertise
  • nursing facility
  • nursing facility resident
  • nursing faculty
  • nursing home
  • nursing home admission
  • nursing home care
  • nursing home facility
  • nursing home patient
  • nursing home placement
  • nursing home population
  • nursing home resident
  • nursing home setting
  • nursing home version
  • nursing implication
  • nursing index
  • nursing informatic
  • nursing inquiry
  • nursing intervention
  • nursing intervention classification
  • nursing journal
  • nursing knowledge
  • nursing language
  • nursing languages
  • nursing leader
  • nursing leadership
  • nursing literature
  • nursing management
  • nursing managers
  • nursing minimum data set
  • nursing model
  • nursing officer
  • nursing organization
  • nursing outcome
  • nursing outcome classification
  • nursing personnel
  • nursing perspective
  • nursing phenomenoN
  • nursing practice
  • nursing practice environment
  • nursing process
  • nursing profession
  • nursing professional
  • nursing program
  • nursing record
  • nursing research
  • nursing researcher
  • nursing resource
  • nursing role
  • nursing scholarship
  • nursing school
  • nursing science
  • nursing service
  • nursing services
  • nursing shortage
  • nursing skill
  • nursing specialty
  • nursing staff
  • nursing student
  • nursing student attitude
  • nursing student experience
  • nursing student perception
  • nursing system
  • nursing team
  • nursing terminology
  • nursing theory
  • nursing time
  • nursing treatment
  • nursing unit
  • nursing work
  • nursing work index
  • nursing workforce

  • Selected Abstracts


    A POTTED HISTORY OF 19TH-CENTURY REMOTE-AREA NURSING IN AUSTRALIA AND, IN PARTICULAR, QUEENSLAND

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 2 2000
    Trudy Yuginovich
    ABSTRACT Knowledge of the history of remote-area nursing in Australia is necessary if we are to truly understand the processes that have dictated the boundaries and reality of the scope of practice for today's RANs (remote-area nurses). This paper briefly explores and discusses the social context and history of remote-area nursing in Australia and, in particular, Queensland during the 19th century. [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 2 2009
    Article first published online: 13 FEB 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 7 2008
    Article first published online: 29 SEP 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 6 2008
    Article first published online: 21 AUG 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 5 2008
    Article first published online: 8 JUL 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 4 2008
    Article first published online: 24 APR 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 3 2008
    Article first published online: 25 FEB 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 1 2008
    Article first published online: 11 DEC 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 6 2007
    Article first published online: 28 AUG 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 3 2007
    Article first published online: 23 FEB 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 5 2006
    Article first published online: 29 AUG 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Current literature in diabetes

    DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 4 2006
    Article first published online: 16 JUN 200
    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, John Wiley & Sons are providing a current awareness service in each issue of the journal. The bibliography contains newly published material in the field of diabetes/metabolism. Each bibliography is divided into 26 sections: 1 Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Genetics; 4 Epidemiology; 5 Immunology; 6 Obesity; 7 Prediction and Prevention; 8 Intervention: a) General; b) Care; c) Drug Therapy; d)Economics; e) Gene therapy; f) Nursing; g) Nutrition; h) Surgery; i) Transplantation; 9 Pathology and Complications: a) General; b) Cardiovascular; c) Eye disease; d) Gestational and fetal; e) Neurological; f) Podiatrical; g) Renal; 10 Endocrinology & Metabolism; 11 Experimental Studies; 12 Diagnosis and Techniques. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author [source]


    Notes on the origins of Epilepsia and the International League Against Epilepsy

    EPILEPSIA, Issue 3 2009
    Simon D. Shorvon
    Summary The recent discovery of archival material has shed interesting light on the origins of Epilepsia and also the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). The idea of an international journal devoted to epilepsy seems first to have arisen from talks between Dr. L. J. J. Muskens and Dr. W. Aldren Turner in 1905. A protracted series of subsequent letters between Muskens and a Haarlem publisher show how the idea slowly took shape. The committee of patronage, editorial board, and editorial assistants was probably first approached at the First International Congress of Psychiatry, Neurology, Psychology, and Nursing of the Insane, held in Amsterdam in 1907. At this meeting, the concept of an international organization to fight epilepsy (to become the ILAE) was also first proposed in public, again by Muskens. The concept of the ILAE was clearly modeled on another international organization,the International Commission for the Study of the Causes of Mental Diseases and Their Prophylaxis. This Commission had been first publicly proposed in 1906 by Ludwig Frank, at the Second International Congress for the Care and Treatment of the Insane. The proposed Commission and ILAE shared many features, aims, and personnel. Despite an auspicious start, the International Commission was prevented by personal and political differences from ever actually coming into being. However, the first issue of Epilepsia appeared in March 1909 and the ILAE was inaugurated in August 1909; and both have flourished and celebrate their centenaries this year. [source]


    The Invisible (Inaudible) Woman: Nursing in the English Academy

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 2 2005
    Liz Meerabeau
    Nursing is numerically a far larger academic discipline than medicine, and is situated in many more higher education institutions in England (over 50), whereas there are 21 medical schools. Like the rest of ,non medical education and training' it is purchased through a quasi-market. Despite the size of this market, however, nursing education has until recently been largely invisible in policy documents and the ambitions of nursing academics to develop their subject are seen as inappropriate. This article explores this invisibility and inaudibility, with particular reference to the 1997 Richards Report, Clinical Academic Careers and the 2001 Nuffield Trust report, A New Framework for NHS/University Relations. It draws on the work of Davies on the ,professional predicament' of nursing, to argue that, although the move of nursing education into higher education had the aim of improving its status, nursing has difficulty finding its voice within academia. As a result, issues which are salient for nursing (as for many of the health professions), such as a poor (or relatively poor) showing in the Research Assessment Exercise and the complexities of balancing research, teaching and maintaining clinical competence, are raised as high-profile issues only in medicine. [source]


    Taurodontism: a review of the condition and endodontic treatment challenges

    INTERNATIONAL ENDODONTIC JOURNAL, Issue 5 2008
    H. Jafarzadeh
    Abstract Taurodontism can be defined as a change in tooth shape caused by the failure of Hertwig's epithelial sheath diaphragm to invaginate at the proper horizontal level. An enlarged pulp chamber, apical displacement of the pulpal floor, and no constriction at the level of the cementoenamel junction are the characteristic features. Although permanent molar teeth are most commonly affected, this change can also be seen in both the permanent and deciduous dentition, unilaterally or bilaterally, and in any combination of teeth or quadrants. Whilst it appears most frequently as an isolated anomaly, its association with several syndromes and abnormalities has also been reported. The literature on taurodontism in the context of endodontics up to March 2007 was reviewed using PubMed, MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature. Despite the clinical challenges in endodontic therapy, taurodontism has received little attention from clinicians. In performing root canal treatment on such teeth, one should appreciate the complexity of the root canal system, canal obliteration and configuration, and the potential for additional root canal systems. Careful exploration of the grooves between all orifices particularly with magnification, use of ultrasonic irrigation; and a modified filling technique are of particular use. [source]


    Effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EVIDENCE BASED HEALTHCARE, Issue 2 2007
    Choong Ng BMedSci(Melb)
    Abstract Background, Anterior instability is a frequent complication following a traumatic glenohumeral dislocation. Frequently the underlying pathology associated with recurrent instability is a Bankart lesion. Surgical correction of Bankart lesions and other associated pathology is the key to successful treatment. Open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation has been advocated as the gold standard because of consistently low postoperative recurrent instability rates. However, arthroscopic glenohumeral stabilisation could challenge open surgical repair as the gold standard treatment for traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Objectives, Primary evidence that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation was systematically collated regarding best-practice management for adults with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Search strategy, A systematic search was performed using 14 databases: MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), ISI Web of Science, Expanded Academic ASAP, Proquest Medical Library, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, TRIP Database, PubMed, ISI Current Contents Connect, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Studies published between January 1984 and December 2004 were included in this review. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria, Eligible studies were those that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability, which had more than 2 years of follow up and used recurrent instability and a functional shoulder questionnaire as primary outcomes. Studies that used non-anatomical open repair techniques, patient groups that were specifically 40 years or older, or had multidirectional instability or other concomitant shoulder pathology were excluded. Data collection and analysis, Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of each study for inclusion into the review, the study design used and its methodological quality. Where any disagreement occurred, consensus was reached by discussion with an independent researcher. Studies were assessed for homogeneity by considering populations, interventions and outcomes. Where heterogeneity was present, synthesis was undertaken in a narrative format; otherwise a meta-analysis was conducted. Results, Eleven studies were included in the review. Two were randomised controlled trials. Evidence comparing arthroscopic and open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation was of poor to fair methodological quality. Hence, the results of primary studies should be interpreted with caution. Observed clinical heterogeneity in populations and outcomes was highlighted and should be considered when interpreting the meta-analysis. Authors also used variable definitions of recurrent instability and a variety of outcome measures, which made it difficult to synthesise results. When comparable data were pooled, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) between the arthroscopic and open groups with respect to recurrent instability rates, Rowe score, glenohumeral external rotation range and complication rates. Conclusions, Statistically, it appears that both surgical techniques are equally effective in managing traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. In light of the methodological quality of the included studies, it is not possible to validate arthoscopic stabilisation to match open surgical stabilisation as the gold standard treatment. Further research using multicentred randomised controlled trials with sufficient power and instability-specific questionnaires with sound psychometric properties is recommended to build on current evidence. The choice of treatment should be based on multiple factors between the clinician and the patient. [source]


    Nursing and midwifery management of hypoglycaemia in healthy term neonates

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EVIDENCE BASED HEALTHCARE, Issue 7 2005
    Vivien Hewitt BSc(Hons) GradDipLib
    Executive summary Objectives The primary objective of this review was to determine the best available evidence for maintenance of euglycaemia, in healthy term neonates, and the management of asymptomatic hypoglycaemia in otherwise healthy term neonates. Inclusion criteria Types of studies The review included any relevant published or unpublished studies undertaken between 1995 and 2004. Studies that focus on the diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care devices for blood glucose screening and/or monitoring in the neonate were initially included as a subgroup of this review. However, the technical nature and complexity of the statistical information published in diagnostic studies retrieved during the literature search stage, as well as the considerable volume of published research in this area, suggested that it would be more feasible to analyse diagnostic studies in a separate systematic review. Types of participants The review focused on studies that included healthy term (37- to 42-week gestation) appropriate size for gestational age neonates in the first 72 h after birth. Exclusions ,,preterm or small for gestational age newborns; ,,term neonates with a diagnosed medical or surgical condition, congenital or otherwise; ,,babies of diabetic mothers; ,,neonates with symptomatic hypoglycaemia; ,,large for gestational age neonates (as significant proportion are of diabetic mothers). Types of intervention All interventions that fell within the scope of practice of a midwife/nurse were included: ,,type (breast or breast milk substitutes), amount and/or timing of feeds, for example, initiation of feeding, and frequency; ,,regulation of body temperature; ,,monitoring (including screening) of neonates, including blood or plasma glucose levels and signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia. Interventions that required initiation by a medical practitioner were excluded from the review. Types of outcome measures Outcomes that were of interest included: ,,occurrence of hypoglycaemia; ,,re-establishment and maintenance of blood or plasma glucose levels at or above set threshold (as defined by the particular study); ,,successful breast-feeding; ,,developmental outcomes. Types of research designs The review initially focused on randomised controlled trials reported from 1995 to 2004. Insufficient randomised controlled trials were identified and the review was expanded to include additional cohort and cross-sectional studies for possible inclusion in a narrative summary. Search strategy The major electronic databases, including MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, etc., were searched using accepted search techniques to identify relevant published and unpublished studies undertaken between 1995 and 2004. Efforts were made to locate any relevant unpublished materials, such as conference papers, research reports and dissertations. Printed journals were hand-searched and reference lists checked for potentially useful research. The year 1995 was selected as the starting point in order to identify any research that had not been included in the World Health Organisation review, which covered literature published up to 1996. The search was not limited to English language studies. Assessment of quality Three primary reviewers conducted the review assisted by a review panel. The review panel was comprised of nine nurses with expertise in neonatal care drawn from senior staff in several metropolitan neonatal units and education programs. Authorship of journal articles was not concealed from the reviewers. Methodological quality of each study that met the inclusion criteria was assessed by two reviewers, using a quality assessment checklist developed for the review. Disagreements between reviewers were resolved through discussion or with the assistance of a third reviewer. Data extraction and analysis Two reviewers used a data extraction form to independently extract data relating to the study design, setting and participants; study focus and intervention(s); and measurements and outcomes. As only one relevant randomised controlled trial was found, a meta-analysis could not be conducted nor tables constructed to illustrate comparisons between studies. Instead, the findings were summarised by a narrative identifying any relevant findings that emerged from the data. Results Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for the objective of this systematic review. The review provided information on the effectiveness of three categories of intervention , type of feeds, timing of feeds and thermoregulation on two of the outcome measures identified in the review protocol , prevention of hypoglycaemia, and re-establishment and maintenance of blood or plasma glucose levels above the set threshold (as determined by the particular study). There was no evidence available on which to base conclusions for effectiveness of monitoring or developmental outcomes, and insufficient evidence for breast-feeding success. Given that only a narrative review was possible, the findings of this review should be interpreted with caution. The findings suggest that the incidence of hypoglycaemia in healthy, breast-fed term infants of appropriate size for gestational age is uncommon and routine screening of these infants is not indicated. The method and timing of early feeding has little or no influence on the neonatal blood glucose measurement at 1 h in normal term babies. In healthy, breast-fed term infants the initiation and timing of feeds in the first 6 h of life has no significant influence on plasma glucose levels. The colostrum of primiparous mothers provides sufficient nutrition for the infant in the first 24 h after birth, and supplemental feeds or extra water is unnecessary. Skin-to-skin contact appears to provide an optimal environment for fetal to neonatal adaptation after birth and can help to maintain body temperature and adequate blood glucose levels in healthy term newborn infants, as well as providing an ideal opportunity to establish early bonding behaviours. Implications for practice The seven studies analysed in this review confirm the World Health Organisation's first three recommendations for prevention and management of asymptomatic hypoglycaemia, namely: 1Early and exclusive breast-feeding is safe to meet the nutritional needs of healthy term newborns worldwide. 2Healthy term newborns that are breast-fed on demand need not have their blood glucose routinely checked and need no supplementary foods or fluids. 3Healthy term newborns do not develop ,symptomatic' hypoglycaemia as a result of simple underfeeding. If an infant develops signs suggesting hypoglycaemia, look for an underlying condition. Detection and treatment of the cause are as important as correction of the blood glucose level. If there are any concerns that the newborn infant might be hypoglycaemic it should be given another feed. Given the importance of thermoregulation, skin-to-skin contact should be promoted and ,kangaroo care' encouraged in the first 24 h after birth. While it is important to main the infant's body temperature care should be taken to ensure that the child does not become overheated. [source]


    Can a purchaser be a partner? nursing education in the English universities

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2001
    E. Meerabeau
    Abstract Since the early 1990s, public sector management in England has been exhorted to follow the example of the private sector, and ,quasi-markets' have been established, for example in the health service. A quasi-market also exists between the NHS and higher education for the purchasing (or procurement) of nursing education. This paper uses policy documents such as the National Health Service Executive Circular (March 1999) on ,Good Contracting Guidelines' for Non-Medical Education and Training, plus other relevant literature on the commodification of higher education, quasi-markets and contract theory to examine this market, and the confusion of two rhetorics, those of competition and partnership. Nursing occupies a marginal place in higher education in England, having only recently become part of it. The emphasis of the quasi-market on the output of a trained ,fit for purpose' labour force combines with professional attempts to create an academic discipline, in complex ways which are as yet underanalysed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Scoping the prospects of Australian mental health nursing

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2000
    Michael Clinton
    ABSTRACT: In March 2000 the Australian & New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses submitted the final report on the National Scoping Study of Mental Health Nursing in Australia to the Mental Health Branch of the Department of Health and Aged Care. In this final article, in a series of four, the authors present an overview of the future prospects of mental health nursing in Australia. [source]


    The first Australian nurse practitioner census: A protocol to guide standardized collection of information about an emergent professional group

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 5 2010
    Sandy Middleton RN PhD
    Middleton S, Gardner G, Gardner A, Della P, Gibb M, Millar L. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2010; 16: 517,524 The first Australian nurse practitioner census: A protocol to guide standardized collection of information about an emergent professional group Internationally, collection of reliable data on new and evolving health-care roles is crucial. We describe a protocol for design and administration of a national census of an emergent health-care role, namely nurse practitioners in Australia using databases held by regulatory authorities. A questionnaire was developed to obtain data on the role and scope of practice of Australian nurse practitioners. Our tool comprised five sections and included a total of 56 questions, using 28existing items from the National Nursing and Midwifery Labour Force Census and nine items recommended in the Nurse Practitioner Workforce Planning Minimum Data Set. Australian Nurse Registering Authorities (n = 6) distributed the survey on our behalf. This paper outlines our instrument and methods. The survey was administered to 238 authorized Australian nurse practitioners (85% response rate). Rigorous collection of standardized items will ensure health policy is informed by reliable and valid data. We will re-administer the survey 2 years following the first survey to measure change over time. [source]


    Determining the professional behaviour of nurse executives

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 4 2010
    Filiz Hisar PhD RN
    Hisar F, Karada, A. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2010; 16: 335,341 Determining the professional behaviour of nurse executives This study was carried out with the aim of determining the professional behaviour of nurse executives. The sample of the study included 104 nurse executives working in university, state and private hospitals in Turkey. Data were collected using a questionnaire, which included demographic characteristics of nurses and a Behavioral Inventory Form for Professionalism in Nursing (BIPN). The questionnaire was filled out by the nurses. The BIPN results showed that the mean score of nurse executives was low. Although the scores of nurse executives who had completed postgraduate studies in nursing were the highest, those who had only completed an associate degree programme were the lowest. In conclusion, the professionalism scores for Turkish nurse executives were found to be low; recommendations for improving these scores were made. [source]


    Nursing and Security in Iraqi Hospitals: Some Problems can be Solved without Foreign Help

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 3 2009
    Sergei V Jargin
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Nursing and medical staff knowledge regarding the monitoring and management of accidental or exposure hypothermia in adult major trauma patients

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 6 2006
    Sharyn Ireland RN Dip.HSc B.Nurs CritCareCert ACCN M.Ed
    Recording a patient's vital signs is a basic requirement that in part informs clinical decision-making. Practice suggests that recording a trauma patient's temperature is occasionally overlooked in the emergency department. A staff survey was undertaken to gain an appreciation of knowledge and understanding of the issues that surround accidental or exposure hypothermia in trauma patients. Results demonstrate that nurses and doctors are unsure of how to define hypothermia and are not conversant with simple ways to prevent heat loss or rewarm patients. Complications from hypothermia such as coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis were seldom identified. Issues that limit staff recording temperature include patient access and acuity, lack of knowledge and confidence and access to temperature-measuring devices. These results emphasize the need for regular education. Implications for clinical practice were considered; an algorithm to guide staff on ways to improve the monitoring and management of temperature in trauma patients was developed. Opportunities for ongoing and further research were identified. [source]


    Journeying to professionalism: The case of Irish nursing and midwifery research

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 4 2004
    Sarah L Condell RGN RM RNT BNS MA
    This paper gives a ,discursive' account of the contemporary development of nursing and midwifery research in the Republic of Ireland in the context of advancing professionalism. Initially, the paper views the landscape by placing research in the current framework of Irish nursing and midwifery. It then examines the map of our present location by documenting a baseline. It ascertains the signposts that are in place by exploring the strategic direction for development. Finally, it uses the compass to orienteer the route through the various obstacles by examining the challenges of the role of the joint appointee leading the implementation of the national Research Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery in Ireland. [source]


    Part two: The core components of legitimate influence and the conditions that constrain or facilitate advanced nursing practice in adult critical care

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 1 2004
    Carol Ball RGN MSc PhD
    This paper describes intervening conditions that might constrain or facilitate the exercise of Legitimate Influence: The Key to Advanced Nursing in Adult Critical Care, the foundation of which is credibility and advanced clinical nursing practice. Constraining conditions are conflict, resistance, gender bias, political awareness and established values. Credibility, advanced clinical nursing practice and strategic activity are required to enhance patient stay in hospital and improve patient outcome. Intervening conditions that facilitate these are overcoming resistance, political awareness and established values. In a previous paper, it was indicated that enhanced patient stay and improved patient outcome were achieved primarily through strategic activity that emphasized restoring patients to a former, or improved, health status. This paper portrays how intervening conditions can impinge upon this and the exercise of legitimate influence. [source]


    Nursing and naturopathy at La Trobe: The challenge of multiparadigm education

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, Issue 5 2001
    Article first published online: 7 JUL 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Identifying Nursing Concepts: Are We Similar?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 3 2010
    Sharie L. Falan PhD
    PURPOSE., The purpose of this article was to define and describe the fundamental aspects of similarity with application to the use of nursing terminologies. DATA SOURCES., Data were obtained from Google, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsychINFO, and PubMed using the keywords "similarity views,""similarity,""concepts and categorization," and other published sources. DATA SYNTHESIS., Three prominent similarity views were compared, contrasted, and applied to the use of nursing diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS., Each view has intentions (requirements) that guide the categorization of information to concepts and influence naming of nursing concepts. IMPLICATIONS., By understanding similarity, nurse educators and technology designers can influence how nursing concepts are represented. [source]


    Development of Two Search Strategies for Literature in MEDLINE,PubMed: Nursing Diagnoses in the Context of Evidence-Based Nursing

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2 2005
    Almuth Berg Dipl.-PGW
    PURPOSE.,To develop and validate search filters for MEDLINE via PubMed according to two categories of the NLINKS-EBN matrix. METHODS.,The search results of the search filters were compared to a gold standard. FINDINGS.,The usage of nursing classification terms for the literature search in evidence-based nursing (EBN) is still limited because taxonomies are neither widely used in nursing literature nor applied for indexing by MEDLINE. The proposed filters achieved a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 94% for "secondary data" and a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 73% for "diagnostic tests." CONCLUSIONS.,The usage of database-specific search filters are a reliable and valid method to search for nursing classification terms in medical databases. [source]


    Nursing Diagnosis Extension and Classification: Ongoing Phase

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2003
    Martha Craft-Rosenberg
    BACKGROUND The Nursing Diagnosis Extension and Classification Project (NDEC) has been active for almost a decade. The team began with the formation of a team of investigators at The University of Iowa College of Nursing. From 1994 until 2000 the research team consisted of 16 investigators who were experts in nursing care across the lifespan. They also represented expertise in both qualitative and quantitative research. The aims of the NDEC research are to evaluate and revise NANDA diagnoses, to validate the diagnoses using a clinical information system, and to develop candidate diagnoses. MAIN CONTENT POINTS Phase 1 of the NDEC research has yielded 116 refined and developed nursing diagnoses that have been submitted to NANDA. Of these, 65 have been approved and 54 appeared in Nursing Diagnoses: Definitions and Classification, 1999,2000 along with 39 NDEC products. In the 2000,2001 edition, 7 diagnoses refined by NDEC and 7 new diagnoses submitted by NDEC are included. As only about half the NDEC products have appeared in NANDA publications, the three-level review process (Diagnosis Review Committee, membership, and Board) has been discussed with the NANDA board. This request is currently being honored by the Diagnosis Review Committee; however, review by the membership and review by the NANDA board is just beginning to move in this direction. Phase 2, clinical validation of the NDEC work, is being conducted at a long-term care facility. It will also be conducted at a large teaching hospital. All the NDEC refinement and development work has been submitted for clinical validation. Currently validation is planned at the label level only. Phase 3 involves identification of candidate diagnoses. Many of the candidate diagnoses were developed during the concept analysis phase, when NDEC team members identified the need for additional diagnoses. Nurses in practice have submitted other candidate diagnoses. In total 195 candidate diagnoses have been identified and placed into a database. In order for the NDEC team to make decisions regarding priorities for diagnosis development, the diagnoses in the candidate database are compared to diagnoses in other classifications that have already been developed. Several classifications are used for comparison including the Omaha System and the Home Health Care Classification. A large table is used to compare candidate label to other labels. Candidate diagnosis included in other classifications will be given lower priority for development by NDEC. CONCLUSIONS The NDEC work plan includes work on diagnoses to be resubmitted to the NANDA Diagnosis Review Committee. It is hoped that the Web site for NLINKS will facilitate the work of diagnosis refinement and development. NDEC will continue to work with any investigator who is seeking assistance. The last part of the work plan is resource acquisition and recruitment of investigators to continue the refinement and development of diagnoses. [source]


    NANDA and NIC: Mediators to Describe Irish Intellectual Disability Nursing

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2003
    Fintan Sheerin
    PURPOSE To identify the foci of interest specific to nursing interventions within residential, intellectual disability nursing through the use of the terms and meanings presented in NANDA and NIC. METHODS Data were collected using a Delphi approach involving a purposive sample of 8 individuals with relevant expertise, followed up by the conduct of three focus groups held with a total sample of 17 intellectual disability nurses working in three Irish service settings: traditional residential, community residential, and nurse education. Data were examined for contextual meaning as well as consensus of perceptions. FINDINGS Many potential interventions and diagnoses were identified for the field of residential learning disability nursing. Interventions that elicited a >50% consensus among participants across groups were examined for contextual meaning, based on the taped and noted responses, and potentially related NIC interventional labels were then applied. These led, through a reverse NIC-NANDA linkage exercise, to the identification of 8 potentially related interventions. The contextual aspect directed the analysis process to identify the nursing diagnoses associated with the interventions to be used, and 21 resultant diagnoses were identified. DISCUSSION Further analysis and study are needed to verify the relevance of these diagnoses and interventions to residential learning disability. A quick comparison of the results with those of studies carried out in other countries demonstrates that certain diagnoses have been identified by one or more authors in their studies. CONCLUSIONS This study identified a number of foci that have achieved various levels of consensus among the study participants. The ongoing study plan will further examine nurses' and managers' perceptions while also looking at these within the context of current service philosophy. [source]