Nonprofit Organizations (nonprofit + organization)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Immediate and Midterm Complications of Sclerotherapy: Report of a Prospective Multicenter Registry of 12,173 Sclerotherapy Sessions

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 2 2005
FACPH, Jean-Jérôme Guex MD
Background Growing interest in sclerotherapy has emphasized the need for complete knowledge of all aspects of this method. Objective To precisely delineate the actual incidence of immediate and delayed untoward events of daily sclerotherapy. Methods A multicenter prospective registry was established in 22 phlebology clinics to report their activity and complications. Results During the study period, 12,173 sessions of sclerotherapy were carried out, 5,434 with liquid, 6,395 with foam, and 344 using both. Four thousand eighty-eight (33.9%) sessions were carried out with ultrasound guidance. Forty-nine incidents or accidents (0.4%) occurred, of which 12 were with liquid and 37 with foam. These were reported during the time of the study and an additional 1-month follow-up. Most numerous were 20 cases of visual disturbances (in 19 cases, foam or air block was used); all resolved shortly, without any after-effects. A femoral vein thrombosis was the only severe adverse event in this study. Conclusions This study demonstrates that sclerotherapy is a safe technique. FUNDING FOR RESEARCH WAS PROVIDED BY THE FRENCH SOCIETY OF PHLEBOLOGY, A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION. [source]


THE COMBINED EFFECT OF DONATION PRICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE INEFFICIENCY ON DONATIONS TO US NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2009
Fred A. Jacobs
We examine the effects that two accounting measures of nonprofit organization (NPO) inefficiency, administrative inefficiency and donation price, have on donations to US NPOs using a better-specified model and industry-specific samples. Although numerous studies examine the effect that donation price has on donations (e.g., Marudas and Jacobs, 2006; Marudas, 2004; Khanna and Sandler, 2000; and Tinkelman, 1999), only three studies examine the effect of administrative inefficiency on donations (Tinkelman and Mankaney, 2007; Frumkin and Kim, 2001; and Greenlee and Brown, 1999). However, none of these studies tests donation price and administrative inefficiency in one model and only two test industry-specific samples of NPOs. We find that misspecifying the model by including only one of these two inefficiency measures creates substantial bias and the effect of administrative inefficiency on donations varies substantially across industries. Administrative inefficiency has a significantly negative effect on donations to NPOs in the full sample and the philanthropy sample, but no significant effect on donations to NPOs in the arts, education, health, or human services samples. Furthermore, donation price has a significantly negative effect on donations to NPOs in the full sample and the education, health and human services samples, but not in the arts or philanthropy samples. Results are also reported for the other variables in the model , government support, program service revenue, fundraising and organizational age, wealth and size. [source]


A Strategic Planning Process for a Small Nonprofit Organization: A Hospice Example

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 2 2000
Cynthia Massie Mara
Strategic planning is an essential part of management. However, planning processes can consume great amounts of time and resources that small, nonprofit organizations may lack. Moreover, the process that is used can be tedious and may result in plans that are discarded before or during their implementation. In this article, a strategic planning process is presented that incorporates a Policy Delphi group technique and Situation Structuring, a computer program that assists participants in structuring or defining the problems to be addressed in the plan. The organization to which the process is applied is a small, nonprofit hospice. Both the planning process and an evaluation of the implementation of the resultant strategic plan are examined. [source]


Inclusive Governance Practices in Nonprofit Organizations and Implications for Practice

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 4 2002
William A. Brown
An inclusive board seeks information from multiple sources, demonstrates an awareness of the community and constituents that benefit from and contribute to the organization's services, and establishes policies and structures to foster stakeholder contributions. This research investigated the prevalence of inclusive governance practices and its relationship to board composition, diversity attitudes, and recruitment practices. Fifty-six executive directors and forty-three board members representing sixty-two nonprofit organizations returned a mailed survey (29 percent response rate). The study profiled two organizations that represented different styles of inclusive governance. The survey, part of a larger study, contained questions about inclusive practices, board composition, attitudes toward diversity, and recruitment practices. Most organizations indicated that they operate with inclusive governance practices. The organizational profiles provide a picture of boards that used different strategies to accomplish the goal of inclusivity. Boards that use more inclusive practices were not necessarily heterogeneous in board member composition. Inclusive boards were more inclined to be sensitive to diversity issues and used recommended board recruitment practices. The existence of a task force or committee on diversity was also significantly associated with a more inclusive board. Nonprofit organizations must consider their philosophy on stakeholder involvement, recognizing that different strategies lead to different levels of stakeholder involvement. [source]


Ethical Climate in Nonprofit Organizations: Propositions and Implications

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 1 2001
David Cruise Malloy
The authors discuss a number of variables that may influence the perception of ethical climate in the nonprofit sector, including individual, organizational, and significant other (peers, coworkers, and superiors) variables. The basis of this discussion is the model developed by Agarwal and Malloy (1999) identifying a framework for nonprofits that is distinct from the for-profit orientation. The authors provide ten propositions and discuss their implications. [source]


The Effects of United Way Membership on Employee Pay in Nonprofit Organizations

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 1 2000
Steve Werner
This research investigates the relationship between United Way membership and the compensation level of employees in nonprofit organizations. This study is based on questionnaires completed by 1,811 employees from sixty-nine nonprofit agencies in a large metropolitan area. Managerial capitalism, agency theory, and United Way funding and governance roles were used to develop the hypotheses. We found that employees of organizations belonging to the United Way receive pay premiums, suggesting that the United Way member agencies are higher-quality agencies that pay their employees higher wages. [source]


A Collaborator Profile for Executives of Nonprofit Organizations

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 4 2000
Samuel Goldman
This study involving ninety-two nonprofit executive directors who engaged in separate interorganizational collaborations investigated the relationship between a select number of individual characteristics (personality and demographic) and perceived collaboration outcome (successful or unsuccessful). The collaborator profile that resulted suggests that directors who are predisposed to perceiving their respective collaborations as successful are extravert, feeling males who have high role ambiguity and low role boundary occupational stress. Given the increasing need for nonprofit organizations to collaborate with other organizations, it is important for nonprofit executives and their boards to be cognizant of some key factors that can lead to successful interorganizational collaborations. [source]


Strategic Positioning and the Financing of Nonprofit Organizations: Is Efficiency Rewarded in the Contributions Marketplace?

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW, Issue 3 2001
Peter Frumkin
This article addresses the question of whether operational efficiency is recognized and rewarded by the private funders that support nonprofit organizations in fields ranging from education to social service to arts and beyond. Looking at the administrative efficiency and fundraising results of a large sample of nonprofit organizations over an 11-year period, we find that nonprofits that position themselves as cost efficient,reporting low administrative to total expense ratios,fared no better over time than less efficient appearing organizations in the market for individual, foundation, and corporate contributions. From this analysis, we suggest that economizing may not always be the best strategy in the nonprofit sector. [source]


Nonprofit organizations and pharmaceutical research and development

DRUG DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH, Issue 7 2009
Walter H. Moos
Abstract Not-for-profit or nonprofit organizations (NPOs) are playing an increasingly important role in providing solutions to the significant challenges faced by both large pharmaceutical and smaller biotechnology companies in today's world. NPOs chartered for the public benefit are common in the United States and in selected other parts of the world. The largest NPOs in the U.S. with bioscience programs include Battelle, the Midwest Research Institute, the Research Triangle Institute, Southern Research, and SRI International. To provide a perspective on NPO business models, 10 SRI case studies spanning a broad range of technical and business initiatives are summarized herein, including basic and contract research, discovery of new drugs and biologics, pharmaceutical and biotech R&D services, technology pivots, company spin-ins and spin-outs, and the creation of new NPOs. The article concludes with lessons learned and food for thought for both pharmaceutical companies and outsourcing participants. Drug Dev Res 70: 461,471, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


NONPROFIT EMPLOYEES' MACHIAVELLIAN PROPENSITIES

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2009
Pamela C. Smith
Nonprofit organizations are held to high ethical standards due to their charitable missions serving the common good. Incidents of fiscal mismanagement within the nonprofit sector make it relevant to assay the ethical principles of employees. This study examines the level of Machiavellian propensities of US nonprofit employees. Results indicate Machiavellian propensities do exist in certain nonprofit employees and these employees agree with questionable behavior. Policy makers and oversight agencies may find these results useful in developing corporate governance and accountability measures for nonprofit organizations. Furthermore, board of director members may use these results to monitor employee actions and address management training. [source]


Corporate giving in the Netherlands 1995-2003: exploring the amounts involved and the motivations for donating

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 1 2006
May-May Meijer
Corporate giving as an expression of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been researched less than the more general theme of CSR. In addition, much of the research in this area focuses on countries with an Anglo cultural tradition. The study outlined in this paper offers a comprehensive longitudinal study of corporate giving in the Netherlands. An overview is provided of corporate giving in the Netherlands in the period from 1995 till 2003. The data are gathered by means of a biennial survey of Dutch companies as part of the ,Giving in the Netherlands' project. Based on these findings, recent developments in corporate giving can be sketched out. Moreover, literature on motives for corporate giving behavior is focused upon and applied in exploring Dutch managers' motivations for offering donations. Nonprofit organizations could use this knowledge to increase the efficiency of their fund raising. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Inclusive Governance Practices in Nonprofit Organizations and Implications for Practice

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 4 2002
William A. Brown
An inclusive board seeks information from multiple sources, demonstrates an awareness of the community and constituents that benefit from and contribute to the organization's services, and establishes policies and structures to foster stakeholder contributions. This research investigated the prevalence of inclusive governance practices and its relationship to board composition, diversity attitudes, and recruitment practices. Fifty-six executive directors and forty-three board members representing sixty-two nonprofit organizations returned a mailed survey (29 percent response rate). The study profiled two organizations that represented different styles of inclusive governance. The survey, part of a larger study, contained questions about inclusive practices, board composition, attitudes toward diversity, and recruitment practices. Most organizations indicated that they operate with inclusive governance practices. The organizational profiles provide a picture of boards that used different strategies to accomplish the goal of inclusivity. Boards that use more inclusive practices were not necessarily heterogeneous in board member composition. Inclusive boards were more inclined to be sensitive to diversity issues and used recommended board recruitment practices. The existence of a task force or committee on diversity was also significantly associated with a more inclusive board. Nonprofit organizations must consider their philosophy on stakeholder involvement, recognizing that different strategies lead to different levels of stakeholder involvement. [source]


The Role of Philanthropy in Local Government Finance

PUBLIC BUDGETING AND FINANCE, Issue 3 2005
Renée A. Irvin
Nonprofit organizations thrive on the altruism of citizens, and actively court donors for major gifts. Yet individual gifts to government agencies are often unexpected, sporadic, and initiated by the donor. This article introduces the phenomenon of private giving to local governments and tests hypotheses regarding the expected forms of giving to public agencies. Results indicate that philanthropy is and will likely remain a minor and highly variable source of revenue, making it an ill-suited replacement for broad-based tax revenue. However, deliberate government efforts to provide a suitable environment for private donations appear to succeed in attracting more gifts per capita. [source]


Nonprofit organizations' use of the internet: A content analysis of communication trends on the internet sites of the philanthropy 400

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 1 2007
Richard D. Waters
To evaluate the current status of communication and fundraising strategies on the Internet, a stratified random sample of the Chronicle of Philanthropy's Philanthropy 400 was content-analyzed in mid-January 2005. Web sites were coded on variables identified in practitioner and scholarly literature on issues of accountability, fundraising practices, and interactive communication strategies. Chi-square analysis found that the top nonprofit organizations included copies of their annual reports, organizational goals, and mission statements, while second-tier organizations were more likely to use a sales approach by using e-commerce technology and terminology to process online donations. [source]


The role of Lay Review Committees in diabetes research

DIABETES/METABOLISM: RESEARCH AND REVIEWS, Issue 4 2003
David P. Stenger
Abstract Type 1 diabetes is unique among disease entities in having a large voluntary health nonprofit organization (the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) that employs the process of review by laypersons (following a review by scientists) in selecting the recipients of its funding awards to individual investigators/trainees: grants, career-development awards, fellowships, and ,innovative grants.' Therefore, that organization can be a suitable model on which an examination of lay review can be based. This paper summarizes (1) the history of how lay review originated and (2) this foundation's experience with it, (3) assesses the impact of the procedure on the discipline of diabetes science, and (4) examines the role it might play in the future, given the current state of that discipline. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


THE COMBINED EFFECT OF DONATION PRICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE INEFFICIENCY ON DONATIONS TO US NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2009
Fred A. Jacobs
We examine the effects that two accounting measures of nonprofit organization (NPO) inefficiency, administrative inefficiency and donation price, have on donations to US NPOs using a better-specified model and industry-specific samples. Although numerous studies examine the effect that donation price has on donations (e.g., Marudas and Jacobs, 2006; Marudas, 2004; Khanna and Sandler, 2000; and Tinkelman, 1999), only three studies examine the effect of administrative inefficiency on donations (Tinkelman and Mankaney, 2007; Frumkin and Kim, 2001; and Greenlee and Brown, 1999). However, none of these studies tests donation price and administrative inefficiency in one model and only two test industry-specific samples of NPOs. We find that misspecifying the model by including only one of these two inefficiency measures creates substantial bias and the effect of administrative inefficiency on donations varies substantially across industries. Administrative inefficiency has a significantly negative effect on donations to NPOs in the full sample and the philanthropy sample, but no significant effect on donations to NPOs in the arts, education, health, or human services samples. Furthermore, donation price has a significantly negative effect on donations to NPOs in the full sample and the education, health and human services samples, but not in the arts or philanthropy samples. Results are also reported for the other variables in the model , government support, program service revenue, fundraising and organizational age, wealth and size. [source]


Are single-gift committed donors different from their multiple-gift counterparts?

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 3 2010
Anyuan Shen
Committed donors who keep giving every year are a key asset for nonprofit organizations because they provide a steady funding source and return a higher lifetime value. We distinguish between committed donors who give only one gift per year (single-gift (SG) donors) and those who give multiple gifts in at least some year (multiple-gift (MG) donors). In this paper, we study whether SG donors and MG donors follow different longitudinal patterns of gift-giving in four consecutive years. We theorize that a donor's yearly gift amount is an indication of his or her willingness to give (WTG) to the organization and may be explained in terms of his or her intrinsic willingness to give (IWTG) and extrinsic willingness to give (EWTG) for that year. We test our theory with data from a leading US nonprofit organization and find that SG donors and MG donors would follow different longitudinal patterns: While SG donors and MG donors would start off at a similar level of WTG in year 1 and would both increase WTG in subsequent years, MG donors would record a higher rate of increase than SG donors. IWTG and EWTG would have different relative importance as determinants of the observed yearly giving level: MG donors depend on both IWTG and EWTG whereas SG donors largely depend on IWTG rather than EWTG to determine how much to give in a year. Our findings suggest that different strategies are needed to manage SG donors and MG donors to sustain and grow annual contributions. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Excessive, optimal, and insufficient fundraising among the Nonprofit Times 100

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 2 2006
Fred A. Jacobs
Using a six-factor model of donations, we estimate the effect on net donations; i.e., donations less fundraising expenditures, of a one percent marginal increase in fundraising expenditures, for each sample nonprofit organization (NPO) from the Nonprofit Times 100 from 2000 to 2002. No prior study of U.S. NPOs estimates the effect of fundraising expense on net donations. We then use these estimates and what we argue is the correct benchmark, the ratio of fundraising expense to donations, to provide evidence, for each NPO, on whether the NPO's level of fundraising is ,excessive,' ,optimal,' or ,insufficient,' relative to the level that maximizes net donations. All prior studies using log-log models use what we suggest is an incorrect benchmark for evaluating NPO fundraising behavior. The estimated effect of a 1% increase in fundraising on net donations varies widely across NPOs in our sample,from an increase in net donations of 0.18% of gross donations to a decrease of 0.66% of gross donations. Of the 76 Nonprofit Times 100 NPOs with usable data in 2002, we estimate that 24 engaged in ,excessive' fundraising, 18 engaged in ,insufficient' fundraising, and 34 did not engage in ,excessive' or ,insufficient' fundraising; i.e., we could not reject the null hypothesis of ,optimal' levels of fundraising. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization

JOURNAL OF HEALTHCARE RISK MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2005
Glenn T. Troyer Esq. Partner
Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves. [source]


Nuri's testimony: HIV/AIDS in Indonesia and bare knowledge

AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 2 2009
TOM BOELLSTORFF
ABSTRACT As an epidemic that has emerged since the 1980s, still has no cure, and may bear no symptoms, HIV/AIDS is powerfully linked to questions of knowledge. In this article, I explore intersections of HIV/AIDS and knowledge by drawing from ethnographic and activist work with an HIV/AIDS nonprofit organization in Indonesia that focuses on gay men and warias (roughly, male transvestites). In particular, I look at testimony, a form of knowledge production differing from confession in that it emphasizes form over content. Examining testimony with regard to persons living with AIDS, I show how it produces a "bare" or "asymptomatic" knowledge that may cast light on broader dynamics of epistemology, selfhood, and belonging. [HIV/AIDS, Indonesia, gay men, transgenderism, knowledge, emotion, nonprofit organizations] [source]


An expanded theory of pluralistic interactions in voluntary nonprofit organizations

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 2 2007
Judith Y. Weisinger
Demographic trends suggest a more culturally diverse society, yet research focusing specifically on the management of this diversity in nonprofit organizations is at a nascent stage. Furthermore, traditional ways of conceptualizing cultural diversity in U.S. society are becoming outmoded. Thus, nonprofit managers and leaders can benefit from new ways of thinking about and managing diversity. In this article, we extend our proposed representationinteraction model of diversity in voluntaristic nonprofits (Weisinger and Salipante, 2005) by more closely examining the interaction prong of our model in order to provide a more grounded understanding of this new approach to increasing pluralism. The expanded model that we discuss here is founded on interaction processes: in-group identity and recategorization. This study enables us to transform our grounded theory into a theory of practices that leaders of voluntaristic organizations can directly apply. We present findings from a field study of a national nonprofit organization and discuss implications for practice and research. [source]


Fractals of strategic coherence in a successful nonprofit organization

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 4 2007
Janice A. Black
We theorize that organizations that are able to use stories and examples to explain their strategy and offer a flexible guide to discretionary employee behaviors use them in what can be termed a fractal fashion. The thesis is based on the idea of how strategic logic can be communicated and how it can be reiterated to lead to strategic coherence across different levels of analysis in organizations. The parallels of a nonlinear, reinforcing process that is based on iteration inspired us to draw on complexity theory and fractal processes to understand the generation of strategic coherence. We present the case of a successful nonprofit organization where it appears that such a fractal use of stories occurred. [source]


Nonprofit organization financial performance measurement: An evaluation of new and existing financial performance measures

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 4 2003
William J. Ritchie
Consensus about financial performance measurement remains elusive for nonprofit organization (NPO) researchers and practitioners alike, due in part to an overall lack of empirical tests of existing and new measures. The purpose of the current study was to explore potential similarities of financial performance measures derived from two sources: current NPO research and key informant interviews with NPO foundation constituencies. The authors examined financial performance measurement ratios with data from fifteen Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 990 line items. Using factor analytic techniques, they found three performance factors, each with two associated financial measurement ratios, to be present. They categorized the performance factors as fundraising efficiency, public support, and fiscal performance. This article discusses implications of the findings and future research. [source]


Designing Agendas to Reflect Board Roles and Responsibilities: Results of a Study

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 1 2000
Sue Inglis
Over a nine-month period the board agendas of a community nonprofit organization were redesigned to reflect a particular board agenda tool titled "Strategic Activities, Resource Planning, and Operations." Feedback from the board members and executive director indicate strong support for the framework in focusing the work of the board. The framework also has implications for how the executive director and board members prepare for meetings and how the shared leadership of the meetings is played out. [source]


Developing and Sharing Team Mental Models in a Profession-driven and Value-laden Organization

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2006
Jeng-Yi Tzeng
While team mental models have been shown to be effective in facilitating team operations in ordinary transactive organizations, their impact on loosely coupled yet value-laden organizations is relatively under studied. Using qualitative inquiry methodology, this study investigates the three referential frameworks (i.e., theoretical knowledge, practical experiences, and team consciousness) of the team mental models employed in a nonprofit organization which provides therapy for hearing-impaired children in Taiwan. The results indicate that fostering a strong team mental model may be an effective way to ensure that the performance of value-laden practice meets a certain expectation. Moreover, I present arguments that because various cognitive properties of team mental models are formed, shared, and represented in different ways, they should be investigated and understood from a holistic perspective; and that it should also be cultivated by an integrative approach that utilizes theoretical, practical, and organizational knowledge. [source]


Nonprofits as Local Government Service Contractors

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW, Issue 4 2009
Richard C. Feiock
Despite the growing role that contracts with nonprofits play in local service delivery, only limited attention has been directed to why some cities rely more on nonprofit organizations to produce services or how political institutions influence the role nonprofits play in service delivery. To investigate these issues, the authors present a transaction cost explanation that focuses on how political system characteristics and structures of service markets shape the costs of negotiating, monitoring, and enforcing contracts for local governments. The findings indicate that forms of government, mayoral turnover, racial segregation, and the market of nonprofit producers influence the role of nonprofits in delivering elder services, but decisions to contract exclusively with nonprofits are subject to different influences than decisions to jointly produce service with a nonprofit organization. [source]


OPERATIONALIZING OPPORTUNITIES AND CREATING PUBLICS IN SALVADORAN CHURCHES: FINDINGS FROM AN ETHNOGRAPHIC PROCESS EVALUATION

ANNALS OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL PRACTICE, Issue 1 2010
James Huff
This article explores how one faith-based nonprofit organization and its various Pentecostal and evangelical church partners in El Salvador are creating associational contexts within which local community development projects are identified and implemented. Observational and interview data derived from a process evaluation of a project identification exercise are examined to explore how different community and organizational stakeholders attempt to implement local development initiatives that will presumably build on local assets and associations. The study details the patterns of participation that emerged as members of local churches negotiated with their neighbors over how to best direct social change in their community. Corresponding analysis of interview data portrays how these same actors relied on diverse social logics,which are both religious and practical in nature,to make sense of and assess some of the key assumptions of a particular form of faith-based development. The case is a good example of how faith-based organizations play key roles in the formation of publics, wherein actors from diverse networks come together to deliberate over the aims and outcomes of local development projects in contemporary El Salvador. [source]


THE INFLUENCE OF VOLUNTEERS, DONATIONS AND PUBLIC SUBSIDIES ON THE WAGE LEVEL OF NONPROFIT WORKERS: EVIDENCE FROM AUSTRIAN MATCHED DATA

ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 1 2010
Astrid Haider
ABSTRACT,:,In this article we add to the literature analyzing wages in the nonprofit sector by estimating a wage function based on employer-employee matched data for Austria. We concentrate on the influence of voluntary contributions on the wage level of paid workers. By using a quantile regression approach we find that the existence of volunteers reduces the wages of paid employees in nonprofit organizations. The number of volunteers does not have an influence on the wage level. Donations have a small but positive effect for higher income groups only. Public subsidies increase wages of all paid workers in a nonprofit organization. [source]


Critical Postcolonial Dance Pedagogy: The Relevance of West African Dance Education in the United States

ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2010
Ojeya Cruz Banks
This dance ethnography examines work conducted by the Dambe Project,a nonprofit organization that specializes in African performing arts education and mentorship. The study focuses on the implications of the organization's dance pedagogy in light of its postcolonial context and the importance of West African dance education in the United States. The study strives to be a conversation between the fields of anthropology and education, dance studies and postcolonial studies.,[pedagogy, African dance, urban education, decolonization] [source]


Transformative Education: Chronicling a Pedagogy for Social Change

ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2008
Miguel Guajardo
This article chronicles the work of the Llano Grande Center for Research and Development, an educational nonprofit organization in South Texas, by following the narrative of one of its students and two of the authors, who are also founders of Llano Grande. Through the use of ethnography, visuals, and storytelling, they present an emerging theory of practice and a hybrid methodology that has contributed to the development of the work, the school, and the community. An activist agenda informed by practice and supported with theory is woven through the text in biographical form. The text also documents the cornerstones of the work: building strong relationships; work originating from self, place, and community; and engaging in meaningful work. When integrated into a seamless practice, this combination of guiding principles yields a certain power that youth and adults alike begin to negotiate within and between their peers, teachers, and community for change. This sense of self, efficacy, and power then informs much of their work as adults.,[Latino epistemology and education, activist ethnography, Llano Grande Center, storytelling, community as text, pedagogy of hope] [source]