Non-market Valuation (non-market + valuation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Pure Altruism, Consumer Behavior and Choice Modeling,

ASIAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL, Issue 2 2006
Jungho Suh
Q51; D64; D12 An important assumption underlying non-market valuation is that it is not the environment but the human preference that is valued. This paper attempts to test whether individual consumer behavior is influenced by a purely altruistic motive, examining the attitude of hikers towards the hypothetical removal of the Muju ski resort from the Mount Togyu National Park in South Korea. Data were collected from samples of hikers and skiers who visited the national park. The respondents were forced to consider trade-offs between the recovery of the lost environmental assets in the Muju ski resort area, skiers' additional travel time, and willingness-to-pay amounts for the hypothetical environmental improvement. It was found that hikers did not take into account skiers' disutility represented by additional travel time. [source]


Design efficiency for non-market valuation with choice modelling: how to measure it, what to report and why,

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCE ECONOMICS, Issue 3 2008
Riccardo Scarpa
We review the basic principles for the evaluation of design efficiency in discrete choice modelling with a focus on efficiency of WTP estimates from the multinomial logit model. The discussion is developed under the realistic assumption that researchers can plausibly define a prior belief on the range of values for the utility coefficients. D -, A- , B- , S- and C- errors are compared as measures of design performance in applied studies and their rationale is discussed. An empirical example based on the generation and comparison of fifteen separate designs from a common set of assumptions illustrates the relevant considerations to the context of non-market valuation, with particular emphasis placed on C- efficiency. Conclusions are drawn for the practice of reporting in non-market valuation and for future work on design research. [source]


Australasian environmental economics: contributions, conflicts and ,cop-outs',

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCE ECONOMICS, Issue 3 2005
Jeff Bennett
Australian and New Zealand environmental economists have played a significant role in the development of concepts and their application across three fields within their subdiscipline: non-market valuation, institutional economics and bioeconomic modelling. These contributions have been spurred on by debates within and outside the discipline. Much of the controversy has centred on the validity of valuations generated through the application of stated preference methods such as contingent valuation. Suggestions to overcome some shortcomings in the work of environmental economists include the commissioning of a sequence of non-market valuation studies to fill existing gaps to improve the potential for benefit transfer. [source]