non-Latino Whites (non-latino + white)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A population-based description of glioblastoma multiforme in Los Angeles County, 1974,1999

CANCER, Issue 12 2005
Indro Chakrabarti M.D., M.P.H.
Abstract BACKGROUND There have been reports that the incidence rates of brain tumors have increased over the past few decades, but most have considered all brain tumors together. The authors analyzed the pattern of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) occurrence in Los Angeles County, California to shed light on the incidence and descriptive epidemiology of this type of brain tumor. METHODS Data were obtained from the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. Incidence rates were analyzed by gender, race, age at diagnosis, period of diagnosis (1974,1981, 1982,1988, or 1989,1999), and socioeconomic status (SES). In addition, data were stratified according to anatomic subsite. A multivariate model describing changes in rates by each of these variables was constructed. RESULTS Age-specific incidence rates (ASIR) rose sharply after age 30 years. The peak ASIR was at age 70,74 years in males and at age 75,79 years in females. The age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) of GBM increased from 1974 to 1999 by an estimated 2.4% per year among males and 2.8% per year among females. Overall, males had a 60% increased risk of brain tumors compared with females. Males had a higher incidence of GBM compared with females at each anatomic subsite except the posterior fossa. The largest male:female ratio occurred in the occipital lobes. Non-Latino whites had the highest incidence rates (2.5 per 100,000) followed by Latino whites (1.8 per 100,000), and blacks (1.5 per 100,000). After 1989, compared with the period before magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was available, there was an increase in GBM incidence rates among those with of higher SES that was most pronounced in females. The incidence of GBM was highest for frontal lobe tumors and for tumors that involved two or more lobes (overlapping tumors), followed by tumors in the temporal and parietal lobes. In the multivariate analysis, year of diagnosis, SES, gender, race (Latino but not black), site, and age at diagnosis all were important predictors of incidence rate. CONCLUSIONS GBM incidence increased in Los Angeles County over the last 30 years and especially after 1989, suggesting that the introduction of MRI may have contributed to the increase. Individuals older than age 65 years experienced the greatest increase in incidence over time. Older age, male gender, higher SES, and non-Latino white race increased the risk of GBM. Previously unreported incidence rates for GBM among Latino whites were significantly lower than among non-Latino whites but were intermediate between non-Latino whites and blacks. Cancer 2005. 2005 American Cancer Society. [source]


PUTTING VIOLENCE IN ITS PLACE: THE INFLUENCE OF RACE, ETHNICITY, GENDER, AND PLACE ON THE RISK FOR VIOLENCE,

CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 1 2001
JANET L. LAURITSEN
Research Summary: This research shows that non-Latino black, non-Latino white, and Latino males and females in the U.S. experience significantly different levels of stranger and non-stranger violence, and that these forms of non-lethal violence are especially pronounced in areas with high levels of socioeconomic disadvantage. Many of the differences between these groups are eliminated once community and other individual characteristics are taken into account. Policy Implications: The results suggest that victimization resources should be geographically targeted at places with high levels of poverty and single-parent families, and that the most stable institutions within these communities be drawn upon to deliver information about victimization prevention and services. [source]


Considering context, place and culture: the National Latino and Asian American Study

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Issue 4 2004
Margarita Alegria
Abstract This paper provides a rationale for, and overview of, procedures used to develop the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS). The NLAAS is nationally representative community household survey that estimates the prevalence of mental disorders and rates of mental health service utilization by Latinos and Asian Americans in the US. The central aims of the NLAAS are to: 1) describe the lifetime and 12-month prevalence of psychiatric disorders and the rates of mental health services use for Latino and Asian American populations using nationwide representative samples of Latinos and Asian Americans, 2) assess the associations among social position, environmental context, and psychosocial factors with the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and utilization rates of mental health services, and 3) compare the lifetime and 12-month prevalence of psychiatric disorders, and utilization of mental health services of Latinos and Asian Americans with national representative samples of non-Latino whites (from the National Comorbidity Study-Replication) (NCS-R) and African Americans (from the National Survey of American Life) (NSAL). This paper presents new concepts and methods utilized in the development of the NLAAS to capture and investigate ethnic, cultural and environmental considerations that are often ignored in mental health research. Copyright 2004 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


A population-based description of glioblastoma multiforme in Los Angeles County, 1974,1999

CANCER, Issue 12 2005
Indro Chakrabarti M.D., M.P.H.
Abstract BACKGROUND There have been reports that the incidence rates of brain tumors have increased over the past few decades, but most have considered all brain tumors together. The authors analyzed the pattern of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) occurrence in Los Angeles County, California to shed light on the incidence and descriptive epidemiology of this type of brain tumor. METHODS Data were obtained from the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. Incidence rates were analyzed by gender, race, age at diagnosis, period of diagnosis (1974,1981, 1982,1988, or 1989,1999), and socioeconomic status (SES). In addition, data were stratified according to anatomic subsite. A multivariate model describing changes in rates by each of these variables was constructed. RESULTS Age-specific incidence rates (ASIR) rose sharply after age 30 years. The peak ASIR was at age 70,74 years in males and at age 75,79 years in females. The age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) of GBM increased from 1974 to 1999 by an estimated 2.4% per year among males and 2.8% per year among females. Overall, males had a 60% increased risk of brain tumors compared with females. Males had a higher incidence of GBM compared with females at each anatomic subsite except the posterior fossa. The largest male:female ratio occurred in the occipital lobes. Non-Latino whites had the highest incidence rates (2.5 per 100,000) followed by Latino whites (1.8 per 100,000), and blacks (1.5 per 100,000). After 1989, compared with the period before magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was available, there was an increase in GBM incidence rates among those with of higher SES that was most pronounced in females. The incidence of GBM was highest for frontal lobe tumors and for tumors that involved two or more lobes (overlapping tumors), followed by tumors in the temporal and parietal lobes. In the multivariate analysis, year of diagnosis, SES, gender, race (Latino but not black), site, and age at diagnosis all were important predictors of incidence rate. CONCLUSIONS GBM incidence increased in Los Angeles County over the last 30 years and especially after 1989, suggesting that the introduction of MRI may have contributed to the increase. Individuals older than age 65 years experienced the greatest increase in incidence over time. Older age, male gender, higher SES, and non-Latino white race increased the risk of GBM. Previously unreported incidence rates for GBM among Latino whites were significantly lower than among non-Latino whites but were intermediate between non-Latino whites and blacks. Cancer 2005. 2005 American Cancer Society. [source]