Non-invaded Sites (non-invaded + site)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A dendro-ecological study of forest overstorey productivity following the invasion of the non-indigenous shrub Lonicera maackii

APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE, Issue 1 2007
K.M. Hartman
Gleason & Cronquist (1991) for vascular plants Abstract Question: Will a non-indigenous, invasive, understorey shrub, such as Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle) have an impact on the productivity of overstorey trees in hardwood forests? Location: Trees from 12 invaded and four non-invaded sites were sampled in hardwood forests of southwestern Ohio, US. Methods: Changes in radial and basal area tree growth in the ten years prior to L. maackii invasion vs. ten years after invasion were examined using dendrochronological techniques. Intervention analysis was used to detect growth changes 25 years prior to and 25 years following invasion, and estimates of load impacts for L. maackii population and biomass were also calculated. Results: We found that the rate of radial and basal area growth of overstorey trees was reduced significantly in eleven out of twelve invaded sites. Non-invaded sites did not exhibit this consistent pattern of reduced growth. For invaded vs. non-invaded sites, the mean basal area growth was reduced by 15.8%, and the overall rate of basal area growth was reduced by 53.1%. Intervention analysis revealed that the first significant growth reductions were 6.25 1.24 (mean SE) years after invasion with the greatest frequency of negative growth changes occurring 20 years after invasion. In invaded stands, 41% of trees experienced negative growth changes. In terms of invasive load estimates per 1000 L. maackii individuals, radial tree growth was reduced by 0.56 mm.a,1, and basal area growth was reduced by 0.74 cm2.a,1, Given these findings, significant economic losses could occur in hardwood forests of Ohio. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study using dendrochronological techniques to investigate the impact of a non-indigenous, understorey plant on overstorey tree growth. Active management will likely be needed to maintain forest productivity in L. maackii impacted landscapes. [source]


Impacts of a woody invader vary in different vegetation communities

DIVERSITY AND DISTRIBUTIONS, Issue 5 2008
T. J. Mason
Abstract The impact of an exotic species in natural systems may be dependent not only on invader attributes but also on characteristics of the invaded community. We examined impacts of the invader bitou bush, Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata, in fore and hind dune communities of coastal New South Wales, Australia. We compared invader impacts on vegetation structure, richness of both native and exotic growth forms and community variability in fore and hind dunes. We found that impacts of bitou invasion were context specific: in fore dune shrublands, functionally distinct graminoid, herb and climber rather than shrub growth forms had significantly reduced species richness following bitou invasion. However, in forested hind dunes, the functionally similar native shrub growth form had significantly reduced species richness following bitou invasion. Density of vegetation structure increased at the shrub level in both fore and hind dune invaded communities compared with non-invaded communities. Fore dune ground-level vegetation density declined at invaded sites compared with non-invaded sites, reflecting significant reductions in herb and graminoid species richness. Hind dune canopy-level vegetation density was reduced at invaded compared with non-invaded sites. Bitou bush invasion also affected fore dune community variability with significant increases in variability of species abundances observed in invaded compared with non-invaded sites. In contrast, variability among all hind dune sites was similar. The results suggest that effects of bitou bush invasion are mediated by the vegetation community. When bitou bush becomes abundant, community structure and functioning may be compromised. [source]


Invasion of Agave species (Agavaceae) in south-east Spain: invader demographic parameters and impacts on native species

DIVERSITY AND DISTRIBUTIONS, Issue 5-6 2004
Ernesto I. Badano
ABSTRACT Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the success of invasive species in new environments. A species may become invasive when a new site provides the potential for positive rates of population growth. This may be the case of several Agave species introduced to Spain in the 1940s. In this paper we document factors that promote large increases of populations of these species, and their effects on native plant communities in two sites of SE Spain. Results showed higher rhizome and bulbil production, and higher establishment rates by agaves in sandy soils than in clay soils. In their native habitats, agaves have low establishment rates and sandy soils are rare. This suggests that sandy soils are an opportunity which releases the clonal reproduction of Agave. The effects of agaves on the physiological performance and reproduction of native species were negative, positive or neutral, depending on the size and rooting depth of neighbours. Assemblages of native species growing within Agave stands had lower diversity than non-invaded sites. Our data show that Agave stands have positive growth rates in SE Spain, and suggest that sandy soils are a niche dimension enhancing the invasion in these new habitats. [source]


A dendro-ecological study of forest overstorey productivity following the invasion of the non-indigenous shrub Lonicera maackii

APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE, Issue 1 2007
K.M. Hartman
Gleason & Cronquist (1991) for vascular plants Abstract Question: Will a non-indigenous, invasive, understorey shrub, such as Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle) have an impact on the productivity of overstorey trees in hardwood forests? Location: Trees from 12 invaded and four non-invaded sites were sampled in hardwood forests of southwestern Ohio, US. Methods: Changes in radial and basal area tree growth in the ten years prior to L. maackii invasion vs. ten years after invasion were examined using dendrochronological techniques. Intervention analysis was used to detect growth changes 25 years prior to and 25 years following invasion, and estimates of load impacts for L. maackii population and biomass were also calculated. Results: We found that the rate of radial and basal area growth of overstorey trees was reduced significantly in eleven out of twelve invaded sites. Non-invaded sites did not exhibit this consistent pattern of reduced growth. For invaded vs. non-invaded sites, the mean basal area growth was reduced by 15.8%, and the overall rate of basal area growth was reduced by 53.1%. Intervention analysis revealed that the first significant growth reductions were 6.25 1.24 (mean SE) years after invasion with the greatest frequency of negative growth changes occurring 20 years after invasion. In invaded stands, 41% of trees experienced negative growth changes. In terms of invasive load estimates per 1000 L. maackii individuals, radial tree growth was reduced by 0.56 mm.a,1, and basal area growth was reduced by 0.74 cm2.a,1, Given these findings, significant economic losses could occur in hardwood forests of Ohio. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study using dendrochronological techniques to investigate the impact of a non-indigenous, understorey plant on overstorey tree growth. Active management will likely be needed to maintain forest productivity in L. maackii impacted landscapes. [source]


Insect diversity and trophic structure differ on native and non-indigenous congeneric rushes in coastal salt marshes

AUSTRAL ECOLOGY, Issue 5 2010
KERINNE J. HARVEY
Abstract Displacement of native plant species by non-indigenous congeners may affect associated faunal assemblages. In endangered salt marshes of south-east Australia, the non-indigenous rush Juncus acutus is currently displacing the native rush Juncus kraussii, which is a dominant habitat-forming species along the upper border of coastal salt marshes. We sampled insect assemblages on multiple plants of these congeneric rushes in coastal salt marshes in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, and compared the abundance, richness, diversity, composition and trophic structure between: (i) J. acutus and J. kraussii at invaded locations; and (ii) J. kraussii at locations either invaded or not invaded by J. acutus. Although J. acutus supported a diverse suite of insects, species richness and diversity were significantly greater on the native J. kraussii. Moreover, insect assemblages associated with J. kraussii at sites invaded by J. acutus were significantly different from, and more variable than, those on J. kraussii at non-invaded sites. The trophic structure of the insect assemblages was also different, including the abundance and richness of predators and herbivores, suggesting that J. acutus may be altering consumer interactions, and may be spreading in part because of a reduction in herbivory. This strongly suggests that J. acutus is not playing a functionally similar role to J. kraussii with respect to the plant-associated insect species assemblages. Consequently, at sites where this non-indigenous species successfully displaces the native congener, this may have important ecological consequences for community composition and functioning of these endangered coastal salt marshes. [source]