non-Hispanic White Women (non-hispanic + white_woman)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Exploring Pregnancy-Related Changes in Alcohol Consumption Between Black and White Women

ALCOHOLISM, Issue 3 2008
Daniel S. Morris
Background:, Although epidemiological data indicate that White women are more likely to drink and binge drink before pregnancy, fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is more common in the Black population than among Whites in the United States. Differences in drinking cessation between Black and White women who become pregnant may help explain the disparity in FAS rates. Methods:, The study sample was comprised of 280,126 non-Hispanic Black and White women, ages 18 to 44, from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) 2001 to 2005 data sets. Predictors of reduction in alcohol consumption (in drinks per month) and binge drinking (>4 drinks on one occasion) by pregnant and non-pregnant women were identified with logistic regression. The effect of interactions of pregnancy status with age, education, and Black or White race on drinks per month and binge occasions were explored using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results:, Pregnant White women averaged 79.5% fewer drinks per month than non-pregnant White women (F = 1250.1, p < 0.001), and 85.4% fewer binge drinking occasions (F = 376, p < 0.001). Pregnant Black women averaged 58.2% fewer drinks per month than non-pregnant Black women (F = 31.8, p < 0.001) and 64.0% fewer binge occasions (F = 13.8, p < 0.001). Compared to Black women, White women appear to make a 38% greater reduction in drinks per month, and a 33% greater reduction in binge occasions. Conclusions:, Non-Hispanic White women appear more likely to reduce drinks per month and binge drinking occasions than non-Hispanic Black women during pregnancy. These findings may help explain disparities in FAS in the United States, though this cross-sectional sample does not permit claims of causation. To better describe the impact of differential drinking reduction on FAS rates, future studies of longitudinal data should be done. [source]


Differences in urinary incontinence between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women: a population-based study

BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2008
Firouz Daneshgari
OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women in a population-based study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS The prevalence of moderate to severe UI, defined as Sandvik severity score of ,3, was assessed in relation to ethnicity by stratification, age adjustment and logistic regression models among 250 Hispanic and 491 non-Hispanic White women in Colorado, USA, who were participants in a breast cancer case-control study. RESULTS Hispanic women reported more stress UI (odds ratio 1.7, P = 0.005) and mixed UI (odds ratio 1.8, P = 0.005) than did non-Hispanic White women. These higher prevalences were largely associated with ethnic differences in parity, body mass index, diabetes, hysterectomy and bilateral oopherectomy. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of moderate to severe UI in Colorado is higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic white women. This difference is largely compatible with differences in reproductive history, adiposity and diabetes. [source]


Estimating personal costs incurred by a woman participating in mammography screening in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program,,

CANCER, Issue 3 2008
Donatus U. Ekwueme PhD
Abstract BACKGROUND. The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) covers the direct clinical costs of breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic follow-up for medically underserved, low-income women. Personal costs are not covered. In this report, the authors estimated personal costs per woman participating in NBCCEDP mammography screening by race/ethnicity and also estimated lifetime personal costs (ages 50-74 years). METHODS. A decision analysis model was constructed and parameterized by using empiric data from a retrospective cohort survey of mammography rescreening among women ages 50 years to 64 years who participated in the NBCCEDP. Data from 1870 women were collected from 1999 to 2000. The model simulated the flow of resources incurred by a woman participating in the NBCCEDP. The analysis was stratified by annual income into 2 scenarios: Scenario 1, <$10,000; and Scenario 2, from $10,000 to <$20,000. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to appraise uncertainty, and all costs were standardized to 2000 U.S. dollars. RESULTS. In Scenario 1, for all races/ethnicities, a woman incurred a 1-time cost of $17 and a discounted lifetime cost of $108 for 10 screens and $262 for 25 screens; in Scenario 2, these amounts were $31 and from $197 to $475, respectively. In both scenarios, a non-Hispanic white woman incurred the highest cost. The sensitivity analyses revealed that >70% of cost incurred was attributable to opportunity cost. CONCLUSIONS. Capturing and quantifying personal costs will help ascertain the total cost (ie, societal cost) of providing mammography screening to a medically underserved, low-income woman participating in a publicly funded cancer screening program and, thus, will help determine the true cost-effectiveness of such programs. Cancer 2008. Published 2008 by the American Cancer Society. [source]


Prevalence of Breastfeeding and Acculturation in Hispanics: Results from NHANES 1999,2000 Study

BIRTH, Issue 2 2005
Maria V. Gibson MD
The study objective was to describe current national estimates of the prevalence of breastfeeding and evaluate differences in reasons not to breastfeed by acculturation status. Methods: Secondary data analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999,2000 was performed on a nationally representative sample of non-Hispanic white women born in the U.S. and Hispanic women with at least one live birth. Acculturation status among Hispanics was assessed using a validated language scale, and prevalence of breastfeeding was based on maternal self-report. Results: Prevalence of breastfeeding was higher in less acculturated Hispanic women (59.2%) than high acculturated Hispanic women (33.1%) and white women (45.1%). Less acculturated Hispanic women were more likely to cite their child's physical/medical condition as a reason not to breastfeed (53.1%), whereas whites and more acculturated Hispanics were more likely to cite their child preferred the bottle (57.5% and 49.8%, respectively). A logistic regression analysis revealed no significant differences in likelihood to breastfeed between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics after controlling for education, age, and income. Higher acculturated women were less likely to breastfeed their children than low acculturated women (95% CI: 0.14,0.40) even after education, age, and income were taken into account. Conclusions: Acculturation differences in prevalence of breastfeeding and reasons not to breastfeed may be the result of attitudinal changes that occur due to acculturation. Further research into the acculturation process and its impact on breastfeeding may help to prevent the decline in breastfeeding that occurs as mothers become more acculturated. Meanwhile, patient education that addresses women's perceptions of the child's health condition and benefits of breastfeeding would be helpful. (BIRTH 32:2 June 2005) [source]


Ethnicity and gestational diabetes in New York City, 1995,2003

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 8 2008
DA Savitz
Objective, To characterise the patterns of occurrence of gestational diabetes among a wide range of ethnic groups that reside in New York City. Design, Birth records and hospital discharge data were linked to more accurately assess the risk of gestational diabetes by ethnicity, compare risk in US-born to foreign-born women, and assess time trends. Setting, New York City. Population, All singleton live births occurring between 1995 and 2003. Methods, Multivariable binomial regression analysis of ethnicity and gestational diabetes, yielding adjusted risk ratios with non-Hispanic white women as the referent. Main outcome measure, Diagnosis of gestational diabetes on birth certificate or in hospital discharge. Results, Adjusted relative risks (aRRs) were modestly elevated for African-Americans and sub-Saharan Africans and somewhat higher (<2.0) for non-Hispanic Caribbeans, Hispanic Caribbeans, Central Americans, and South Americans. The aRR was 4.7 (95% CI = 4.6,4.9) for South Central Asians (with an absolute gestational diabetes risk of 14.3%), 2.8 (95% CI = 2.7,3.0) among South-East Asian and Pacific Islanders, and 2.3 (95% CI = 2.2,2.4) among East Asians. Among South Central Asians, the greatest risks were found for women from Bangladesh (aRR = 7.1, 95% CI = 6.8,7.3). Foreign-born women consistently had higher risk than US-born women. Risk for gestational diabetes increased over time among South Central Asians, some Hispanic groups, and African-Americans. Conclusions, Risk of gestational diabetes appears to vary markedly among ethnic groups, subject to potential artefacts associated with screening and diagnosis. These differences would have direct implications for health care and may suggest aetiologic hypotheses. [source]


Differences in urinary incontinence between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women: a population-based study

BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2008
Firouz Daneshgari
OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women in a population-based study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS The prevalence of moderate to severe UI, defined as Sandvik severity score of ,3, was assessed in relation to ethnicity by stratification, age adjustment and logistic regression models among 250 Hispanic and 491 non-Hispanic White women in Colorado, USA, who were participants in a breast cancer case-control study. RESULTS Hispanic women reported more stress UI (odds ratio 1.7, P = 0.005) and mixed UI (odds ratio 1.8, P = 0.005) than did non-Hispanic White women. These higher prevalences were largely associated with ethnic differences in parity, body mass index, diabetes, hysterectomy and bilateral oopherectomy. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of moderate to severe UI in Colorado is higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic white women. This difference is largely compatible with differences in reproductive history, adiposity and diabetes. [source]