Nondominant Hand (nondominant + hand)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Impaired Motor Function in Patients with Psychogenic Pseudoseizures

EPILEPSIA, Issue 12 2001
Dalma Kalogjera Sackellares
Summary: ,Purpose: To evaluate motor speed and grip strength in patients with well-documented psychogenic pseudoseizures. Methods: We analyzed manual motor speed and grip strength in a group of 40 patients with confirmed psychogenic pseudoseizures (without evidence of concomitant epilepsy) and a group of 40 normal controls matched for handedness and gender, and of comparable age. The two groups were compared with respect to manual motor performance with the dominant hand, nondominant hand, and asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant hands. For the patient sample, we reviewed the neurologic history. Results: Patients with pseudoseizures performed more poorly than controls with both dominant and nondominant hands. In addition, pseudoseizure patients failed to demonstrate the dominant-hand advantage observed in the normal control subjects on both tasks. The patient group had a high incidence of head trauma and other antecedent neurologic risk factors, and the proportion of left-handers was 3 times higher than expected. Conclusions: Bilaterally reduced motor speed and grip strength, reduced intermanual performance asymmetry, the high percentage of left-handers, and historical evidence of antecedent insults to the brain indicate that frontal lobe impairment may be common in patients with psychogenic pseudoseizures. [source]


Effector-independent representations of simple and complex imagined finger movements: a combined fMRI and TMS study

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, Issue 12 2003
J. P. Kuhtz-Buschbeck
Abstract Kinesthetic motor imagery and actual execution of movements share a common neural circuitry. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used in 12 right-handed volunteers to study brain activity during motor imagery and execution of simple and complex unimanual finger movements of the dominant and the nondominant hand. In the simple task, a flexible object was rhythmically compressed between thumb, index and middle finger. The complex task was a sequential finger-to-thumb opposition movement. Premotor, posterior parietal and cerebellar regions were significantly more active during motor imagery of complex movements than during mental rehearsal of the simple task. In 10 of the subjects, we also used transcranial magnetic brain stimulation to examine corticospinal excitability during the same motor imagery tasks. Motor-evoked potentials increased significantly over values obtained in a reference condition (visual imagery) during imagery of the complex, but not of the simple movement. Imagery of finger movements of either hand activated left dorsal and ventral premotor areas and the supplementary motor cortex regardless of task complexity. The effector-independent activation of left premotor areas was particularly evident in the simple motor imagery task and suggests a left hemispherical dominance for kinesthetic movement representations in right-handed subjects. [source]


Temporal dynamics of ipsilateral and contralateral motor activity during voluntary finger movement

HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING, Issue 1 2004
Ming-Xiong Huang
Abstract The role of motor activity ipsilateral to movement remains a matter of debate, due in part to discrepancies among studies in the localization of this activity, when observed, and uncertainty about its time course. The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the spatial localization and temporal dynamics of contralateral and ipsilateral motor activity during the preparation of unilateral finger movements. Eight right-handed normal subjects carried out self-paced finger-lifting movements with either their dominant or nondominant hand during MEG recordings. The Multi-Start Spatial Temporal multi-dipole method was used to analyze MEG responses recorded during the movement preparation and early execution stage (,800 msec to +30 msec) of movement. Three sources were localized consistently, including a source in the contralateral primary motor area (M1) and in the supplementary motor area (SMA). A third source ipsilateral to movement was located significantly anterior, inferior, and lateral to M1, in the premotor area (PMA) (Brodmann area [BA] 6). Peak latency of the SMA and the ipsilateral PMA sources significantly preceded the peak latency of the contralateral M1 source by 60 msec and 52 msec, respectively. Peak dipole strengths of both the SMA and ipsilateral PMA sources were significantly weaker than was the contralateral M1 source, but did not differ from each other. Altogether, the results indicated that the ipsilateral motor activity was associated with premotor function, rather than activity in M1. The time courses of activation in SMA and ipsilateral PMA were consistent with their purported roles in planning movements. Hum. Brain Mapp. 23:26,39, 2004. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Glove perforations during open surgery for gynaecological malignancies

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 8 2008
AP Manjunath
Objective, To audit glove perforations at laparotomies for gynaecological cancers. Setting, Gynaecological oncology unit, cancer centre, London. Design, Prospective audit. Sample, Twenty-nine laparotomies for gynaecological cancers over 3 months. Methods, Gloves used during laparotomies for gynaecological cancer were tested for perforations by the air inflation and water immersion technique. Parameters recorded were: type of procedure, localisation of perforation, type of gloves, seniority of surgeon, operation time and awareness of perforations. Main outcome measure, Glove perforation rate. Results, Perforations were found in gloves from 27/29 (93%) laparotomies. The perforation rate was 61/462 (13%) per glove. The perforation rate was three times higher when the duration of surgery was more than 5 hours. The perforation rate was 63% for primary surgeons, 54.5% for first assistant, 4.7% for second assistant and 40.5% for scrub nurses. Clinical fellows were at highest risk of injury (94%). Two-thirds of perforations were on the index finger or thumb. The glove on the nondominant hand had perforations in 54% of cases. In 50% of cases, the participants were not aware of the perforations. There were less inner glove perforations in double gloves compared with single gloves (5/139 versus 26/154; P = 0.0004, OR = 5.4, 95% CI 1.9,16.7). The indicator glove system failed to identify holes in 44% of cases. Conclusions, Glove perforations were found in most (93%) laparotomies for gynaecological malignancies. They are most common among clinical fellows, are often unnoticed and often not detected by the indicator glove system. [source]


The contribution of the palmaris longus muscle to the strength of thumb abduction

CLINICAL ANATOMY, Issue 4 2010
Hope Gangata
Abstract The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is described as a weak flexor of the wrist and a tensor of the palmar aponeurosis, but not a thumb abductor. The PLM is believed to aid thumb abduction through its insertion onto the thenar eminence. Two groups, both right hand dominant, were selected from 1,200 sampled participants. The first group comprised of 38 subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM and was used to determine the strength of thumb abduction. The second group comprised of 30 subjects, with bilateral presence of the PLM, and it was used to calculate the effects of hand dominance. A significant number of subjects with bilateral absence of the PLM were observed and undocumented. Using a dynamometer in subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM, the force of thumb abduction was significantly greater on the hand with a PLM than the one without it (P = 0.014), irrespective of hand dominance. In the second sample with bilateral PLM, thumb abduction on the dominant hand was 10% stronger than on the nondominant hand and was similar to the universally accepted average of 10% increase in grip strength of the dominant hand. Thus, 10% was deducted from all the dominant hands, and the force of thumb abduction remained greater on the hand with PLM than the hand without it (P = 0.049). The results of this study demonstrated the PLM to be involved in thumb abduction, and the authors therefore recommend that this action of the muscle be universally accepted by anatomists and hand surgeons. Clin. Anat. 23:431,436, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Impaired Motor Function in Patients with Psychogenic Pseudoseizures

EPILEPSIA, Issue 12 2001
Dalma Kalogjera Sackellares
Summary: ,Purpose: To evaluate motor speed and grip strength in patients with well-documented psychogenic pseudoseizures. Methods: We analyzed manual motor speed and grip strength in a group of 40 patients with confirmed psychogenic pseudoseizures (without evidence of concomitant epilepsy) and a group of 40 normal controls matched for handedness and gender, and of comparable age. The two groups were compared with respect to manual motor performance with the dominant hand, nondominant hand, and asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant hands. For the patient sample, we reviewed the neurologic history. Results: Patients with pseudoseizures performed more poorly than controls with both dominant and nondominant hands. In addition, pseudoseizure patients failed to demonstrate the dominant-hand advantage observed in the normal control subjects on both tasks. The patient group had a high incidence of head trauma and other antecedent neurologic risk factors, and the proportion of left-handers was 3 times higher than expected. Conclusions: Bilaterally reduced motor speed and grip strength, reduced intermanual performance asymmetry, the high percentage of left-handers, and historical evidence of antecedent insults to the brain indicate that frontal lobe impairment may be common in patients with psychogenic pseudoseizures. [source]