Non-carious Cervical Lesions (non-cariou + cervical_lesion)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Connective tissue graft plus resin-modified glass ionomer restoration for the treatment of gingival recession associated with non-carious cervical lesion: a randomized-controlled clinical trial

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PERIODONTOLOGY, Issue 9 2009
Mauro Pedrine Santamaria
Abstract Background: The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the treatment of gingival recession, associated with non-carious cervical lesions by a connective tissue graft (CTG) alone, or in combination with a resin-modified glass ionomer restoration (CTG+R). Materials and Methods: Forty patients presenting Miller Class I buccal gingival recessions, associated with non-carious cervical lesions, were selected. The defects were randomly assigned to receive either CTG or CTG+R. Bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), relative gingival recession (RGR), clinical attachment level (CAL) and cervical lesion height (CLH) coverage were measured at baseline and 45 days, and 2, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Results: Both groups showed statistically significant gains in CAL and soft tissue coverage. The differences between groups were not statistically significant in BOP, PD, RGR and CAL, after 6 months. The percentages of CLH covered were 74.88 8.66% for CTG and 70.76 9.81% for CTG+R (p>0.05). The estimated root coverage was 91.91 17.76% for CTG and 88.64 11.9% for CTG+R (p>0.05). Conclusion: Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that both procedures provide comparable soft tissue coverage. The presence of the glass ionomer restoration may not prevent the root coverage achieved by CTG. [source]


Cervical restoration and the amount of soft tissue coverage achieved by coronally advanced flap: A 2-year follow-up randomized-controlled clinical trial

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PERIODONTOLOGY, Issue 5 2009
Mauro Pedrine Santamaria
Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the 2-year follow-up success of the treatment of gingival recession associated with non-carious cervical lesions by a coronally advanced flap (CAF) alone or in combination with a resin-modified glass ionomer restoration (CAF+R). Material and Methods: Sixteen patients with bilateral Miller Class I buccal gingival recessions, associated with non-carious cervical lesions, were selected. The defects received either CAF or CAF+R. Bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), relative gingival recession (RGR), clinical attachment level (CAL) and cervical lesion height (CLH) coverage were measured at the baseline and 6, 12 and 24 months after the treatment. Results: Both groups showed statistically significant gains in CAL and soft tissue coverage. The differences between groups were not statistically significant in BOP, PD, RGR and CAL, after 2 years. The percentages of CLH covered were 51.57 17.2% for CAF+R and 53.87 12.6% for CAF (p>0.05). The estimated root coverage was 80.37 25.44% for CAF+R and 83.46 20.79% for CAF (p>0.05). Conclusion: Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that both procedures provide acceptable soft tissue coverage after 2 years, with no significant differences between the two approaches. [source]


Non-carious cervical lesions on permanent anterior teeth: a new morphological classification

AUSTRALIAN DENTAL JOURNAL, Issue 2 2010
JA Michael
Abstract Background:, Various cross-sectional forms of non-carious cervical lesions have been described but no formal morphological classification system has been developed. The aims of this study were to describe the spectrum of common morphological forms of non-carious cervical lesions observed within a large sample of extracted human permanent anterior teeth and to develop a system for classification based on morphological features. Methods:, Over 15,000 extracted permanent anterior teeth were examined macroscopically under illumination at 2 magnification. Well-defined, descriptive categories were formed, based on observable non-carious cervical lesion features and using terminology currently reported in the literature. The lesions were then sorted into these categories. Results:, Five hundred and forty-two non-carious cervical lesions were identified on 15,289 teeth extracted in the early to mid 20th century, representing a frequency of 3.5%. The main categories developed were "shallow", "concave", "wedge-shaped", "notched", and "irregular". Conclusions:, The new morphological classification system provides an alternative to presently used systems based on aetiology, and should facilitate future research on non-carious cervical lesions. [source]


Non-carious cervical lesions: a scanning electron microscopic study

AUSTRALIAN DENTAL JOURNAL, Issue 2 2010
JA Michael
Abstract Background:, Examining non-carious cervical lesions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides an opportunity to clarify their complex aetiology. This study aimed to examine the morphological forms of non-carious cervical lesions found within a sample of extracted human permanent anterior teeth using scanning electron microscopy. Methods:, Five examples of non-carious cervical lesions from each of eight different morphologic categories were replicated and examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results:, In total, 40 non-carious cervical lesions were examined at magnifications ranging from 10 to 2605 magnification. Qualitative ultrastructural features evident in the lesions were described and classified according to their appearance. A total of 13 different qualitative features were observed throughout the sample of NCCLs. Conclusions:, SEM highlighted a broad range of microscopic features of NCCLs, providing valuable insights into their complex, multifactorial aetiology. [source]


The cervical wedge-shaped lesion in teeth: a light and electron microscopic study

AUSTRALIAN DENTAL JOURNAL, Issue 3 2009
TJ Daley
Abstract Background:, The cervical non-carious wedged-shaped lesion is controversial in that its aetiology may involve attrition, erosion, abrasion and stress-corrosion (abfraction). This study examined the histopathology of anterior teeth with cervical wedge-shaped lesions by light and electron microscopy to elucidate their pathogenesis. Methods:, Ten undecalcified human teeth with cervical lesions were available for investigation. Patency of the dentine tubules was tested using red dye penetration from the pulp chamber. The morphology of normal and sclerotic dentine adjacent to the cervical wedge-shaped lesions was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The numbers and diameters of dentinal tubules were measured at different levels beneath the surfaces of the lesions. Results:, The gross and microscopic features of the worn teeth were described. Red dye penetration tests showed white tracts of sclerotic tubules contrasted with red tracts of patent tubules. Numbers of tubules per square area and diameters of patent and sclerotic tubules varied at different levels within the dentine due to deposits of intratubular dentine. Conclusions:, The cervical wedge is shaped by interactions between acid wear, abrasion and dentinal sclerosis. No histopathological evidence of abfraction was found. Clinical diagnosis, conservation and restoration of non-carious cervical lesions need to take into account the extent of sclerotic dentine beneath wedge-shaped lesions. [source]