Non-atopic Asthma (non-atopic + asthma)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Non-atopic intrinsic asthma and the ,family tree' of chronic respiratory disease syndromes

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Issue 6 2009
P. G. Holt
Summary We present a scheme below in which the most common forms of inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract, notably atopic and non-atopic asthma and COPD, are depicted as separate offshoots from a common ,at-risk' pathway underpinned by genotypes related to aberrations in control of host defence and tissue repair mechanisms. We propose that entrance into this pathway is initially programmed by environmental experience during infancy and early childhood, in particular by severe lower respiratory tract infection, and that further progression towards expression of specific disease phenotype(s) is determined by the nature, timing and frequency of additional environmental insults subsequently encountered. At the one extreme, early sensitization of at-risk subjects to aeroallergens can potentially drive rapid progression towards expression of the atopic asthmatic phenotype under the dual onslaught of inflammatory responses to allergens/pathogens. At the opposite end of the spectrum the drip-feed effects of occasional infections on respiratory function(s) are amplified over a longer time frame by inflammation resulting from exposure to tobacco smoke and/or related chemical pollutants. Non-atopic asthma is envisaged to fit between these two extremes, being driven essentially by the downstream effects of respiratory infections alone in at-risk subjects. An important common factor in all three disease phenotypes is that acute exacerbations are typically driven by infections, the host responses to which display a characteristic T-helper type 2-like footprint, which in our view points to underlying genotype(s) which result in unbalanced host responses to respiratory pathogens. [source]


Airway hyper-reactivity mediated by B-1 cell immunoglobulin M antibody generating complement C5a at 1 day post-immunization in a murine hapten model of non-atopic asthma

IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 2 2004
Ivana Kawikova
Summary Contact skin immunization of mice with reactive hapten antigen and subsequent airway challenge with the same hapten induces immediate airflow obstruction and subsequent airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) to methacholine challenge, which is dependent on B cells but not on T cells. This responsiveness to airway challenge with antigen is elicited as early as 1 day postimmunization and can be adoptively transferred to na´ve recipients via 1-day immune cells. Responses are absent in 1-day immune B-cell-deficient JH,/, mice and B-1 B-cell-deficient xid male mice, as well as in recipients of 1-day immune cells depleted of cells with the B-1 cell phenotype (CD19+ B220+ CD5+). As B-1 cells produce immunoglobulin M (IgM), we sought and found significantly increased numbers of anti-hapten IgM-producing cells in the spleen and lymph nodes of 1-day immune wild-type mice, but not in xid mice. Then, we passively immunized naive mice with anti-hapten IgM monoclonal antibody and, following airway hapten challenge of the recipients, we showed both immediate airflow obstruction and AHR. In addition, AHR was absent in complement C5 and C5a receptor-deficient mice. In summary, this study of the very early elicited phase of a hapten asthma model suggests, for the first time, a role of B-1 cells in producing IgM to activate complement to rapidly mediate asthma airway reactivity only 1 day after immunization. [source]


Relationship between adipokines and manifestations of childhood asthma

PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 6 2008
Kyung W. Kim
Although the prevalences of asthma and obesity are increasing substantially in recent decades, very little is known about the possible association between them. We evaluated the roles of leptin, adiponectin, and resistin, which are adipokines produced by adipose tissue, on childhood asthma, and their association with pulmonary function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We studied 149 atopic asthmatic children, 37 non-atopic asthmatic children, and 54 healthy children. Body mass index was calculated using height and weight, which were measured on the same day that pulmonary function tests and methacholine challenge tests were performed. Skin prick tests were performed, and total eosinophil count, total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), serum eosinophil cationic protein, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin were measured in all subjects. Atopic asthmatics had lower resistin levels compared with non-atopic asthma and control groups, but leptin and adiponectin did not show any difference among these three groups. Resistin demonstrated positive correlation with methacholine PC20 and negative correlations with eosinophil count and serum total IgE. Leptin and adiponectin showed associations with forced expiratory volume in 1 s or forced expiratory flow between 25,75%. Multiple regression analysis revealed that resistin was a significant predictive factor for asthma. There was no direct association between asthma and leptin or adiponectin. Our findings suggest that resistin may play a negative predictive role in asthma. Adiponectin and leptin showed close associations with pulmonary function and may have disease-modifying effects in children with asthma. [source]


Non-atopic intrinsic asthma and the ,family tree' of chronic respiratory disease syndromes

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Issue 6 2009
P. G. Holt
Summary We present a scheme below in which the most common forms of inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract, notably atopic and non-atopic asthma and COPD, are depicted as separate offshoots from a common ,at-risk' pathway underpinned by genotypes related to aberrations in control of host defence and tissue repair mechanisms. We propose that entrance into this pathway is initially programmed by environmental experience during infancy and early childhood, in particular by severe lower respiratory tract infection, and that further progression towards expression of specific disease phenotype(s) is determined by the nature, timing and frequency of additional environmental insults subsequently encountered. At the one extreme, early sensitization of at-risk subjects to aeroallergens can potentially drive rapid progression towards expression of the atopic asthmatic phenotype under the dual onslaught of inflammatory responses to allergens/pathogens. At the opposite end of the spectrum the drip-feed effects of occasional infections on respiratory function(s) are amplified over a longer time frame by inflammation resulting from exposure to tobacco smoke and/or related chemical pollutants. Non-atopic asthma is envisaged to fit between these two extremes, being driven essentially by the downstream effects of respiratory infections alone in at-risk subjects. An important common factor in all three disease phenotypes is that acute exacerbations are typically driven by infections, the host responses to which display a characteristic T-helper type 2-like footprint, which in our view points to underlying genotype(s) which result in unbalanced host responses to respiratory pathogens. [source]


The continuing enigma of non-atopic asthma

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Issue 7 2005
A. Jayaratnam
No abstract is available for this article. [source]