Non-acid Reflux (non-acid + reflux)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Review article: the role of non-acid reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

ALIMENTARY PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS, Issue 12 2000
P. O. Katz
The role of acid in the pathogenesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been extensively studied and is well accepted. The role, if any, of non-acid reflux, in particular duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux, is much debated. The availability of new technology to detect non-acid reflux has heightened interest in this question. This article reviews the following: How do we define non-acid reflux? Does duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux (alone or in combination) cause oesophageal injury, symptoms or both? What is its role in complicated GERD? What methods are available to assess non-acid reflux? Does non-acid reflux need treatment and if so what modalities are available? [source]


Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

MOUNT SINAI JOURNAL OF MEDICINE: A JOURNAL OF PERSONALIZED AND TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE, Issue 1 2009
Yevgenia Y. Pashinsky MD
Abstract Gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs with a higher prevalence in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis than in matched controls. Silent reflux occurs in about a third of patients with significant gastroesophageal reflux disease; thus, objective measurements are required to evaluate gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with advanced lung diseases. We provide here a detailed description of acid and non-acid reflux and the diagnostic evaluation for pulmonologists and lung transplant surgeons suspecting reflux as a contributing factor in advanced lung diseases. We review the evidence for gastroesophageal reflux disease causing idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other select pulmonary diseases and the potential role of antireflux surgery in the management of advanced lung disease and transplant patients. Mt Sinai J Med 76:24,29, 2009 Mount Sinai School of Medicine [source]


Characterization of reflux events after fundoplication using combined impedance,pH recording,

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 1 2007
S. Roman
Background: Laparoscopic fundoplication effectively controls symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and decreases acid reflux, but its impact on non-acid reflux is not known. The aim of the study was to characterize reflux events after fundoplication using oesophageal combined multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII),pH monitoring, to demonstrate its efficacy on acid as well as non-acid reflux events. Methods: Thirty-six patients in whom ambulatory MII,pH recording was performed after laparoscopic fundoplication were reviewed retrospectively. There were 23 symptomatic and 13 asymptomatic patients, whose results were compared with those of 72 healthy volunteers. Results: Oesophageal acid exposure was low in all but one operated patient, and there was no difference between those with and without symptoms. The median number of reflux events over 24 h was lower after fundoplication (11 in operated patients compared with 44 in healthy volunteers; P < 0001). Almost all reflux events were non-acid after surgery whereas acid reflux episodes were predominant in healthy volunteers. Proximal reflux events were less common in operated patients. Non-acid reflux events were significantly associated with symptoms after surgery in some patients. Conclusion: Fundoplication restores a competent barrier for all types of reflux. Reflux events are mostly non-acid after surgery, and such events may be positively correlated with symptoms. Copyright 2006 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]