Archaeology

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences


Selected Abstracts


1. THE HISTORY OF ARCHAEOLOGY IN DENMARK BEFORE 1800

ACTA ARCHAEOLOGICA, Issue 1 2007
Article first published online: 16 MAY 200
First page of article [source]


SETTLEMENT ARCHAEOLOGY IN ICELAND

ACTA ARCHAEOLOGICA, Issue 2 2001
The Race for the Pan-Scandinavian Project in 193
First page of article [source]


THE ETHNOHISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF NORTHERN EURASIA

ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY, Issue 4 2007
25 May 200, Irkutsk
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


THE CHALLENGE OF ,TECHNOLOGICAL CHOICES'FOR MATERIALS SCIENCE APPROACHES IN ARCHAEOLOGY,

ARCHAEOMETRY, Issue 1 2000
B. SILLAR
Recently several anthropological and sociological studies have interpreted technologies as cultural choices that are determined as much by local perceptions and the social context fly any material constraints or purely functional criteria. Using the example of ceramic technology we consider how materials science studies can contribute to and benefit from this understanding of technology as a social construct. Although we acknowledge some potential difficulties, it is our contention that both materials scientists and archaeologists have gained much and have much to gain by cooperating together to study ancient technologies, and that the concept of ,technological choices'can facilitate a wider consideration of the factors shaping technological developments. [source]


LET THERE BE IRONY: CULTURAL HISTORY AND MEDIA ARCHAEOLOGY IN PARALLEL LINES

ART HISTORY, Issue 5 2005
WOLFGANG ERNST
Stephen Bann is well known as an art critic, art historian, cultural historian and museologist, but his writings have yet to be discovered from the point of view of media theory. This article applies Bann's proposal of an ,ironical museum' to a self-reflective media culture, while at the same time establishing the difference between a media-archaeological and an art-historical approach, particularly in accounts of new media in the first half of the nineteenth century and in the present. To what extent was the historical imagination developed in the romantic period an effect of new media and new media technologies? It is argued that although the discourse of history has always depended on the media of its representation (verbal and visual), its character changed dramatically with the arrival of mechanical means for recording historical evidence. The ,antiquarian' method of archival investigation of the past, with its almost haptic taste for the mouldy, decaying fragment, is considered and compared to narrative aesthetics. A key question is considered from different disciplinary perspectives: can we speak of a cultural transition or a radical break with the emergence of photography? The essay concludes that what we learn from Stephen Bann's analyses is the significance of an ever-alert awareness of the intricate relations between cultural and technological phenomena, a kind of media self-irony which, apparently, was present in the past to antiquaries and historiographers, to painters, engravers and to creators of historical museums. [source]


TRAGEDY AND ARCHAEOLOGY, FORTY YEARS AFTER,

BULLETIN OF THE INSTITUTE OF CLASSICAL STUDIES, Issue 1 2003
AXEL SEEBERGArticle first published online: 12 MAR 2010
There is new evidence, including some with a possible bearing on the early popularity of Euripides outside Athens (as reported by Plutarch); his superior popularity in later Antiquity is also stressed. A few working hypotheses seem to merge: revival of interest in the second century AD transformed the craft of acting (as in Comedy) , in performance, comedies may have outlasted tragedies. Tragic myths are depicted as myths, while stage illustration stands for feats of acting, as evidenced by the emphasis on servant parts. [source]


Americanist Archaeologies: 2008 in Review

AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 2 2009
B. Sunday Eiselt
ABSTRACT A review of published literature, conference proceedings, and Internet sources pertaining to "Americanist archaeology" in 2008 reveals three major themes: conflict, catastrophe, and collaboration. Scholars debated the role of archaeology in planning for and executing military operations in the Middle East while maintaining a vigorous interest in structural and physical violence worldwide. Environmental archaeologists considered the effects of catastrophic events, including new theories over the demise of Clovis cultures. In addition, several major reports and regulations highlighted the complexities of indigenous relations and gender equity in the profession. Enhanced technologies, funding for global initiatives in human rights, economic and environmental sustainablility, and creative forms of engagement are reshaping "Americanist archaeology" as a democratic, anthropological, and relevant pursuit. [Keywords: archaeology, annual review, conflict, catastrophe, collaboration] [source]


Memory Work: Archaeologies of Material Practices edited by Barbara J. Mills and William H. Walker

AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 2 2009
KATINA LILLIOS
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Inventing the Pasts in North Central Europe: The National Perception of Early Medieval History and Archaeology by Matthias Hardt, Christian Lbke and Dittmar Schorkowitz

EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE, Issue 4 2006
CHARLES WEST
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Prolegomenon to a history of paleoanthropology: The study of human origins as a scientific enterprise.

EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 5 2004
Part 1.
Interest in the history of paleoanthropology and the other disciplines related to human origins studies has grown considerably over the last several decades. Some very informative historical surveys have been written by prominent scientists reflecting on the major developments in their fields. Some well-known early examples include Glyn Daniel's The Idea of Prehistory (1962) and The Origins and Growth of Archaeology (1967), which focus primarily on the history of archaeology, Kenneth Oakley's "The problem of man's antiquity: an historical survey" published in the Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) [Geology] (1964), and L. S. B. Leakey's Unveiling Man's Origins; Ten Decades of Thought about Human Evolution (1969), with the latter two focusing on the contributions of geology, paleontology, and biology to the problem of human evolution. [source]


Testing Adaptational Explanations of Culture: The Utility of eHRAF World Cultures and eHRAF Archaeology

GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY BULLETIN OF THE GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY DIVISION, Issue 2 2009
Melvin Ember
First page of article [source]


The formation and sedimentary infilling of the Cave of Hearths and Historic Cave complex, Makapansgat, South Africa

GEOARCHAEOLOGY: AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL, Issue 4 2004
A.G. Latham
The archaeology of caves is best served by including a study of natural effects prior to and during anthropogenic input. This is especially true for the Cave of Hearths because not only has erosion determined the area of occupation, but also subsequent undermining has caused collapse of some of the rearward parts of the site during Early Stone Age (Acheulian) and later times; and this had a major impact on excavation. The key to understanding the nature of the collapsed layers was the rediscovery of a lower part of the cavern below the whole site. This lower cavern is no longer accessible, but the evidence for it was revealed in a swallow hole by R.J. Mason, and in archived material at the Department of Archaeology, University of Witwatersrand. The creation and dissolution of dolomite fragments in the upper layers has resulted in the formation of thick, carbonate-cemented breccia that has preserved underlying layers and prevented further collapse. We agree with Mason that further archaeological and hominid finds await excavation under the proximate Historical Cave west entrance. This area has the potential for archaeological and palaeoanthropological material that predates the layers in the Cave of Hearths. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


M25 roadworks reveal earliest UK Neanderthal occupation at Dartford

GEOLOGY TODAY, Issue 5 2010
Francis Wenban-Smith
As anyone travelling on the roads of southeast England between 2006 and 2008 has probably been aware, major improvements have recently been made at the junction of the M25 and A2 motorways, south of the main Dartford crossing of the River Thames (Fig. 1). The roadworks, funded by the UK Highways Agency, with the main contractors Jacobs Babtie and Costain, were accompanied by archaeological investigations carried out by Oxford Archaeology between 2003 and 2006. The archaeological programme had a major Palaeolithic/Pleistocene element under my direction (Fig. 2) that has produced evidence of Neanderthal occupation early in the last glaciation (the Devensian, which lasted from 115 000 to 10 000 bp), during a period when Britain had until now, been thought to have been entirely deserted. Figure 1. Site location and areas of investigation. Figure 2. The author examines flint artefacts. [source]


Toward Best Practice in Mediterranean Underwater Archaeology

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 2 2010
Elizabeth S. Greene
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Neolithic Archaeology in the Inter-Tidal Zone

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
JULIE SATCHELL
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Archaeology of the Russian Scare: the Port Adelaide torpedo station Lighthouse Archaeology: the Port MacDonnell and Cape Banks Light

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
PAULA MARTIN
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


The Perception of Archaeology in Africa: Opportunities and Potential

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 2 2008
Babagana Abubakar
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Cultural Site Formation Processes in Maritime Archaeology: Disaster Response, Salvage and Muckelroy 30 Years on

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
Martin Gibbs
Thirty years after Muckelroy's seminal 1976 paper on shipwreck site formation, research on the cultural processes which contribute to the creation and modification of shipwrecks remains limited. It is proposed that by adopting a process-oriented framework, we can integrate and synthesize the documentary, oral and archaeological evidence of human response to shipwreck into a structure which parallels the physical progress of the disaster. Possible cultural responses to shipwreck are considered, from pre-voyage planning through to post-impact salvage, including physical correlations potentially visible in the archaeological record. 2006 The Author [source]


Archaeology of a Naval Battlefield: H. L. Hunley and USS Housatonic

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
David L. Conlin
The American Civil War shipwrecks H. L. Hunley and USS Housatonic have been the focus of intensive archaeological investigations since the discovery of Hunley in 1995. H. L. Hunley, the world's first successful combat submarine, sank the Union blockader USS Housatonic in 1864, but sank immediately afterwards. In work done prior to the recovery of Hunley in 2000, site-formation processes for both vessels were a primary research focus,a necessary precursor to identifying battlefield behaviour. This paper presents research on the Hunley/Housatonic Naval Engagement Site, where both wrecks are treated as complementary components of a single battlefield site. 2006 The Authors [source]


A Harbour Large Enough to Admit a Whole Fleet: The Maritime History and Archaeology of Port Arthur, Edited by Richard Tuffin, Greg Jackman and Julia Clark

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
JOE FLATMAN
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


The New Centre for Maritime Archaeology at Oxford University

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 1 2004
Jonathan Cole
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Archaeology of the Ljubljanica River (Slovenia): early underwater investigations and some current issues

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
Andrej Gaspari
Abundant archaeological evidence and specific geomorphologic features make the upper course of the Ljubljanica River running through Ljubljana Moor (Slovenia) one of the most interesting rivers in Europe. Roman bronze vessels and iron weapons found by chance in the Ljubljanica at Vrhnika, the ancient Nauportus, led the director of the Provincial Museum in Ljubljana, Karel De,man, to devise a large scale plan for an underwater survey of the riverbed. This, one of the first modern research projects of underwater archaeology was executed in 1884 with the help of divers from the Austro-Hungarian naval base in Pula. Investigations by the Group for Underwater Archaeology and the activities of amateur divers from 1979 onwards revealed distinctly structured distributions of underwater finds on several sites in the upper course of the river indicating possible sacred places with votive offerings and funeral sites, as well as other non-ritual concentrations. [source]


Archaeology and Respect for the Dead

JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHILOSOPHY, Issue 3 2003
Geoffrey Scarre
abstract,Contemporary archaeologists commonly acknowledge moral responsibilities to the descendants of the subjects whose remains they disturb. There has been comparatively little reflection within the professional community on whether they have duties to the dead themselves. I argue that doing wrong to the dead is not reducible to harming their successors; that there are ways in which archaeologists can wrong the dead qua the living persons they once were; and that nevertheless this may not have such radical implications for the practice of archaeology as might first be imagined. [source]


Location, Location, Location: Gender and the Archaeology of Urban Settlement

JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION, Issue 3 2002
Sharon Haar
The word community describes both organizations of individuals with a shared identity and discrete spaces shared by these individuals. The elision of the two definitions,one social, the other spatial, contains a contested condition. Typically conceived as separate and gendered spheres, domesticity and urbanity have been crucial to the changing physical definition of modern space. The destruction of the Hull House Social Settlement and the building of an urban campus, the University of Illinois at Chicago, is a case study in the nature of the often gendered and continuing contest over the public space of the city. [source]


New Perspectives in Maya Archaeology

JOURNAL OF LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 2 2006
Christian Isendahl
First page of article [source]


Cobble Circles and Standing Stones: Archaeology at the Rivas Site, Costa Rica

JOURNAL OF LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 2 2004
Kira Blaisdell-Sloan
Cobble Circles and Standing Stones: Archaeology at the Rivas Site, Costa Rica. Jeffrey Quilter, Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2004. 218 pp. [source]


Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology

JOURNAL OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY, Issue 8 2008
Pietro Baraldi
Abstract This paper introduces presentations given at the fourth International Conference on the Application of Raman Spectroscopy in Art and Archaeology, held in Modena, Italy, in the Ducal Palace, on 5,8 September 2007. The subjects of lectures and posters presented were concerned mainly with the new applications of Raman microscopy and other Raman techniques to more problematic samples, such as lakes, inks, and fluorescent dyes. Chronologically, the applications extended from the 10th century BC to the present day. The areas considered in the research were wide-ranging in terms of subject-matter and also geographically. New techniques have been developed for the study of binders in paintings and lakes, and with movable instrumentation on unmovable samples. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology

JOURNAL OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY, Issue 10 2006
Ludovic Bellot-Gurlet
Abstract This paper gives a short overview of the Special Issue on Raman Spectroscopy in Art and Archaeology, with the papers collected after the ,3rd International Conference on the Application of Raman Spectroscopy in Art and Archaeology' held at the University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France, from 31 August to 3 September, 2005. The contributions present an extended view of the work in the field, from technical developments and special analytical procedures to various applications. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Experimental Archaeology: Investigation on the Copper,Aluminum,Silicon,Oxygen System

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY, Issue 7 2002
Hans-Joerg Woelk
The behavior of the Cu-Al-Si-O system was investigated in the temperature range of 800,1150C. X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, diffusive reflectance, and electron microscopy were applied to obtain information about the influence of sintering, crystallization, and chemical reaction, each of which determines the color of the material. Definition of the artificial term "engobe," opposite to the term "glaze," was possible using copper(II) oxide (CuO) as its indicator. The detected chemical processes render possible explanations about the traditional way of ceramic painting during the 16th century and support the knowledge transfer from the viewpoint of history and that of natural science, as attempted by "archaeometry." [source]


Dangerous Places: Health, Safety, and Archaeology

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2001
Matt O'mansky
Dangerous Places: Health, Safety,and Archaeology. David A. Poirier and Kenneth L. Feder. eds. Westport, CT and London: Bergin and Garvey, 2001. + 249 pp. [source]