New Zealand Experience (new + zealand_experience)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


BT03 SILASTIC RING MINI GASTRIC BYPASS FOR MORBID OBESITY: THE NEW ZEALAND EXPERIENCE

ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 2009
K. C. Wong
Purpose: , The laparoscopic mini gastric bypass (LMGB) is purportedly a technically simpler, yet equally effective operation to the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass as treatment for morbid obesity. This study reports the early results of LMGB in a major New Zealand bariatric centre. Methodology: , Clinical data was prospectively collected on all patients undergoing LMGB over a two year period. Results: , 142 patients were studied. 77% were females. Mean age was 43.8. Pre-operative mean body weight and body mass index (BMI) were 121.3 kg and 45.4 kg/m2 respectively. Mean BMI at one and two years follow up had decreased to 27.35 and 25.72 kg/m2 respectively. 83% of patients reported obesity associated co-morbidities pre-operatively. Post-operatively, 78% of patients reported a reduction in medication requirement. All surgery was performed laparoscopically. There were no anastomotic leaks and zero mortality. 8% of patients required further operations for complications or revision to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. 20% of patients required subsequent endoscopic interventions, the majority for investigation of vomiting and/or pain. 22% of patients required re-admission. 14% of patients reported new onset reflux or worsening of pre-existing reflux after LMGB. 82% of patients reported increased exercise capability post LMGB. 54% of patients required vitamin supplementation. Conclusion: , LMGB achieves significant weight loss and resolution of obesity related co-morbidities with a low short term complication rate. LMGB should be considered as a safe and simple surgical option for morbid obesity. [source]


ESTABLISHING WATERSHED MANAGEMENT IN LAW: NEW ZEALAND'S EXPERIENCE,

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, Issue 4 2001
Eric Pyle
ABSTRACT: New Zealand is one of the first countries in the world to enshrine the concept of watershed management in law, through institutional arrangements and the Resource Management Act of 1991-a law constructed on a watershed management legacy begun in 1941. This paper outlines the development of New Zealand's Resource Management Act (as it applies to water management) and the lessons that have been learned in its implementation. [source]


The Tung Oil Boom in Australasia: a Network Perspective

GEOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH, Issue 3 2009
MICHAEL ROCHE
Abstract Ideas about networks are explored in the context of the interest within the British Empire and the United States of America in planting Tung Oil trees (Aleurites fordii) during the 1920s and 1930s. Closer attention is paid to the Australian and New Zealand experience and short-lived enthusiasm for the search for seeds, the collation of information on growth rates, and the planting of Tung trees. The paper briefly distinguishes various types of network research in human geography and concludes by raising some questions about space and time in network approaches in the social sciences more generally. [source]


Solving the surgical waiting list problem?

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2000
New Zealand's, booking system'
Abstract This article discusses the development and implementation of New Zealand's booking system for publicly funded non-urgent surgical and medical procedures. The ,booking system' emerged out of New Zealand's core services debate and the government's desire to remove waiting lists. It was targeted for implementation by mid-1998. However, the booking system remains in an unsatisfactory state and a variety of problems have plagued its introduction. These include a lack of national consistency in the priority access criteria, failure to pilot the system and a shortfall in the levels of funding available to treat the numbers of patients whose priority criteria ,scores' deem them clinically eligible for surgery. The article discusses endeavours to address these problems. In conclusion, based on the New Zealand experience, the article provides lessons for policy-makers interested in introducing surgical booking systems. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


A Critique of the Private Health Insurance Regulations

THE AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 3 2004
Rhema Vaithianathan
The private health insurance sector is one of the most regulated sectors in Australia. The Private Health Insurance Incentives Scheme, along with community rating, is intended to make private insurance equitable, profitable and popular. We argue that the subsidy to health insurance ought to be a very effective tool for increasing insurance,but it was ineffective because community rating was ineffective. Using data from the Household Expenditure Survey we find that despite community rating rules which prohibit age-adjusted premiums, young adults paid considerably less for their insurance than older adults. We conclude that insurers circumvented community rating through plan design, screening older consumers into more expensive plans. We also find that the penalty of 2 per cent per year for delaying insurance, introduced as part of the lifetime cover plan, is too low to be effective. We reflect on the New Zealand experience, where a completely deregulated insurance industry continues to be profitable and enjoys similar rates of coverage to those of Australia, and we ask whether Australia too could not benefit from complete deregulation. [source]


The Impact of Proportional Representation on Government Effectiveness: The New Zealand Experience

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, Issue 4 2003
Jonathan Boston
It is often claimed that proportional representation (PR) undermines government effectiveness, including decisional efficacy, fiscal prudence, electoral responsiveness and accountability. Drawing on New Zealand's experience since the introduction of a mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system in 1996, this article examines the impact of the new voting system on government effectiveness. Although government durability has been substantially reduced and the policy-making process has become more complex, governments under MMP appear to be no less able to address major policy problems or respond to changing economic circumstances. Moreover, New Zealand has maintained continuous fiscal surpluses under MMP , a radical departure from the protracted, and often large, deficits that characterised the previous two decades under a majoritarian electoral system. [source]