New Zealand College (new + zealand_college)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Australian and New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses Research Board Bulletin

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2004
Article first published online: 11 AUG 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Scoping the prospects of Australian mental health nursing

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2000
Michael Clinton
ABSTRACT: In March 2000 the Australian & New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses submitted the final report on the National Scoping Study of Mental Health Nursing in Australia to the Mental Health Branch of the Department of Health and Aged Care. In this final article, in a series of four, the authors present an overview of the future prospects of mental health nursing in Australia. [source]


Scoping practice issues in the Australian mental health nursing workforce

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2000
Michael Clinton
ABSTRACT This is the third of four articles on the scoping study of the Australian mental health nursing workforce conducted on behalf of the Australian and New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses (ANZCMHN) for the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council (AHMAC) National Working Group on Mental Health (NWGMH). Its purpose is to focus on factors that significantly affect mental health nursing practice. The issues of advanced practice, regulation of nursing, accreditation, credentialling and demarcation with other disciplines are addressed. [source]


Scoping mental health nursing education

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 1 2000
Michael Clinton
ABSTRACT: In late 1999 the National Mental Health Working Group of the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council commissioned the Australian and New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses to undertake a scoping study of mental health nursing. A final report will be submitted to the National Mental Health Working Group in February 2000. The purpose of this article is to draw attention to some of the systemic problems that confront the education of mental health nurses in Australia. Shortcomings in the preparation of undergraduate students of nursing for commencing practice in mental health nursing are described and comments are given on issues affecting the quality of postgraduate mental health nursing education. KEY WORDS: mental health, nursing education. [source]


Development and validation of clinical indicators for mental health nursing practice

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 1 2000
Georgina Skews
ABSTRACT: A national study was undertaken in Australia to develop and validate a set of clinical indicators for mental health nursing. Using survey and action research procedures, the indicators were developed in two stages. During stage one, focus group interviews involving 39 nurses were conducted at national conferences in Australia and New Zealand in order to provide a pool of indicator statements. A Delphi survey of an Australian sample of mental health nurses (n = 33) was then conducted to refine the indicators. In stage two, the refined indicators were tested and validated in selected clinical settings. A total of 1751 mental health nurses employed at 14 sites were involved in the second stage of the study. The resulting data were used to establish the set of national indicators that the Australian and New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses will use in practice accreditation and benchmarking. [source]


Optimal sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy: Review and recommendations

JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY, Issue 3 2010
Andrew Thomson
Abstract Sedation practices for endoscopy vary widely. The present review focuses on the commonly used regimens in endoscopic sedation and the associated risks and benefits together with the appropriate safety measures and monitoring practices. In addition, alternatives and additions to intravenous sedation are discussed. Personnel requirements for endoscopic sedation are reviewed; there is evidence presented to indicate that non-anesthetists can administer sedative drugs, including propofol, safely and efficaciously in selected cases. The development of endoscopic sedation as a multi-disciplinary field is highlighted with the formation of the Australian Tripartite Endoscopy Sedation Committee. This comprises representatives of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, the Gastroenterological Society of Australia and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Possible future directions in this area are also briefly summarized. [source]


Survey of the learning activities of Australasian radiation oncology specialist trainees

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 6 2008
T Holt
Summary Trainee radiation oncologists must master a substantial body of skills and knowledge to become competent specialists. The resources available to support this are limited. We surveyed the 90 registrars enrolled in the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Surgeons (RANZCR) radiation oncology training programme to obtain a range of information about their learning activities (with a significant focus on part 1 teaching). Responses were received from 59 registrars (66% of those eligible). Trainees reported spending a median 2.5 h per week (range 0,10 h) in formal teaching activities. With regard to part 1 exam preparation, 83% reported having had physics teaching , the median quality was 5/7; 88% had radiobiology teaching , the median quality was 4/7; 52% had anatomy teaching , the median quality was 3/7. Registrars training within the RANZCR radiation oncologists training programme perceive their own clinical learning environment as generally good; however' 50% of respondents felt that more teaching was needed for part 1 subjects. This compared with only 19% of respondents who felt that more teaching was required for part 2 exam preparation. Innovative solutions, such as centralized web-based teaching, may help to address weaknesses in part 1 teaching. With increasing demands on radiation oncologists and trainees it will be important to monitor learning environments. [source]


Preparing to sit the Royal Australia and New Zealand College of Radiologists Faculty of Radiation Oncology Fellowship Part 2 examination: The value of a workshop including practice and feedback

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 5 2007
S Bydder
Summary A workshop has been held annually to help prepare candidates to sit the Royal Australia and New Zealand College of Radiologists Part 2 Faculty of Radiation Oncology examination. This study examined the value of such a course and its component parts and assessed attendees' learning environments. We collected detailed information from participants before and after the training workshop in 2005. A specific feature of this workshop included the use of an examination technique feedback form to facilitate the provision of systematic and comprehensive feedback to individual candidates after mock examination. Participants completed course evaluation forms and a learning environment survey. There were 22 candidate participants. The course and its components of this course were perceived very positively , including the examination technique feedback forms and written advice. Only three of the 24 questions regarding the registrars learning environment had less than 80% favourable responses , two of these questions related to workload. The course design described seems reasonably satisfactory in that it included the components ranked most highly by candidates. We also identified a number of variations that may be useful for future workshops. Although learning environments were generally good, we identified a perceived problem with workloads affecting a significant number of registrars. [source]


Assessment of abstracts submitted to the annual scientific meeting of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 4 2006
S Bydder
Summary The process for selecting abstracts submitted for presentation at annual scientific meetings should ensure both the quality of these meetings and fairness to prospective presenters. The aim of the present study was to review the assessment of radiation oncology abstracts submitted for oral presentation to the 2004 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists annual scientific meeting. Selection criteria were developed that were primarily focused on the subjective aspects of abstract quality. All research abstracts were reviewed blindly by five individual reviewers (four radiation oncologists and a statistician), scoring each abstract in five categories. The scores of three reviewers were used to select the top 30 general and top eight trainee entries. For comparison, cluster analysis using the scores of all five reviewers was used to group papers into two ranks. There was a strong correlation in total scores for each paper, between all reviewers. Similarly, the study design subscale was strongly correlated between all reviewers. Abstracts belonging to the first-rank cluster were generally selected. Most trainee entries would have been successful in being accepted into the general programme. The selection process described appears feasible and fair and may improve the quality of meetings. [source]


Radiologist workloads in teaching hospital departments: Measuring the workload

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
AG Pitman
Summary This article proposes a practical method for measuring staff radiologist workloads (clinical productivity) in teaching hospital departments of radiology in Australia. It reviews the Australian background to this, including the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) Education Board accreditation guidelines and the development of the RANZCR practice costing model. It reviews overseas methods of radiologist workload measurement and trends in radiologist workloads both in Australia and overseas. It proposes a practical and simple workload measuring method based on relative value units derived from the RANZCR model. Using a previous national workload survey in teaching hospitals, it proposes initial workload benchmarks when using this method. Strengths and weaknesses of this method and alternatives are reviewed, and a number of proposals for Australian teaching radiology departments are put forward to advance the issue of radiologist workloads in a disciplined manner. [source]


55th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, 21,24 October 2004, Perth, Western Australia

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 5 2005
Article first published online: 14 SEP 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


55th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, 21,24 October 2004, Perth, Australia

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
Article first published online: 21 APR 200
First page of article [source]


Paediatric radiotherapy in Australia and New Zealand: An anachronism in 2003?

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 4 2003
Verity Ahern
Summary This report reviews the activities of the Paediatric Special Interest Group of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists in terms of its involvement with the Australian and New Zealand Children's Cancer Study Group and its research and educational activities. Examples of when and how radiotherapy is currently used in the management of paediatric malignancies are provided. Some thoughts for the future of both paediatric radiotherapy and our subspecialty are also presented. [source]


Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Annual Scientific Meeting Abstracts

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 2 2002
Michael R Sage
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Abstracts of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, May 3,7, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

PAIN MEDICINE, Issue 6 2008
Article first published online: 20 AUG 200
First page of article [source]


The Faculty of Pain Medicine, Australian and New Zealand College of Anesthetists

PAIN MEDICINE, Issue 4 2005
Colin S. Goodchild MA, FANZCA, FFPMANZCA, MB BChir
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Aseptic precautions for inserting an epidural catheter: a survey of obstetric anaesthetists

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 6 2002
J. E. Sellors
Summary We performed a postal survey of Fellows of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists with a special interest in obstetric practice, about their beliefs regarding aseptic precautions for insertion of an epidural catheter in the labour ward. Of the 435 consultant anaesthetists surveyed, 367 responded (84%), revealing a wide variation in practice. It was not thought to be essential practice to remove a watch before washing hands by 51 respondents (14%), to wear a facemask by 105 (29%) or to wear a sterile gown by 45 (12%). Three anaesthetists (1%) did not believe sterile gloves were essential. However, all respondents indicated that an antiseptic skin preparation was essential. Our results raise questions regarding an acceptable standard of aseptic practice for the insertion of an epidural catheter in labour and we propose a minimal standard of essential precautions. [source]


A study investigating obstetricians' and gynaecologists' management of women requesting an intrauterine device

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 2 2010
Kirsten I. BLACK
Background:, Intrauterine methods including the copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) provide highly effective long-term reversible contraception. The reasons for relative low use of these methods in Australia compared to many European countries are not clear, but may in part relate to provider reluctance because of outdated knowledge about their safety and efficacy. Aims:, The aim of this study was to survey Australian Fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists about their knowledge of the risks, benefits and mechanisms of action of intrauterine methods. Methods:, In 2008, we undertook a cross-sectional survey of all Australian Fellows not registered as a subspecialist. The survey was mailed to 1050 practitioners and 701 were returned, comprising a response rate of 67%. Results:, Knowledge about the LNG-IUS was significantly better than for the Cu-IUD in terms of correct understanding about mechanism of action (89.3% vs. 30%; P < 0.001) and efficacy (63.2% vs. 33.5%; P < 0.001). According to the WHO, both methods are considered suitable for use in nulliparous women, yet only 39.1% of providers believed the Cu-IUD suitable compared to 69.4% for the LNG-IUS (P < 0.001). When responses were analysed according to time from graduation, many aspects of knowledge about these devices showed a linear trend, with greater accuracy in recent graduates (<10 years) compared with graduates of more than 30 years. Conclusion:, Both methods are highly effective, non-user dependent and reversible and deserve greater understanding and consideration for use by Australian practitioners and women. [source]


An Australian and New Zealand survey of practice of the use of oxytocin at elective caesarean section

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
Joanne C. MOCKLER
Background:, The use of oxytocin to prevent postpartum haemorrhage at elective caesarean section is largely based on evidence derived from vaginal births. Overseas studies indicate wide variation in practice with regard to specific doses of oxytocin administered at caesarean section. No such surveys have been undertaken in Australia or New Zealand. Aims:, To survey and report Australian and New Zealand practice regarding oxytocin administration at elective caesarean section. Methods:, A structured questionnaire was posted to Fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists resident in Australia and New Zealand. Results:, One thousand five hundred and forty-seven questionnaires were distributed, of which 890 (58%) were returned. Of these, 700 Fellows, 600 from Australia and 100 from New Zealand, currently practiced obstetrics. Almost all Fellows, 686 (98%), reported that they administered an oxytocin bolus at elective caesarean section, most commonly 10 IU (n = 460) or 5 IU (n = 220). The choice of bolus dose was related to country, duration and type (private or public) of practice. A majority of Fellows, 683 (98%), used an additional oxytocin infusion, either routinely or selectively. A total of 68 different regimens were reported. The single most common regimen was 40 IU oxytocin in 1000 mL administered over four hours, used by 255 Fellows (37%). Conclusions:, There are wide variations in the usage of oxytocin at elective caesarean section in Australia and New Zealand, most likely due to a lack of high level evidence to guide practice. Appropriately designed clinical trials are needed to provide evidence to support future practice. [source]


Opinion: Integration of diagnostic and management perspectives for placenta accreta

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 6 2009
Alec W. WELSH
The 2007 New South Wales/Queensland Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Annual Scientific Meeting convened a panel to discuss multidisciplinary perspectives on the management of placenta accreta, percreta or increta. While it was anticipated that this panel would stimulate discussion, the cohesion between the approaches was underestimated. This document represents an integration of the perspectives of the invited speakers at this presentation, with backgrounds in maternal,fetal medicine, gynaecological oncology, radiology and general obstetrics and gynaecology. [source]


Detection and management of decreased fetal movements in Australia and New Zealand: A survey of obstetric practice

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
Vicki FLENADY
Background:, Decreased fetal movement (DFM) is associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, there is limited research to inform practice in the detection and management of DFM. Aims:, To identify current practices and views of obstetricians in Australia and New Zealand regarding DFM. Methods:, A postal survey of Fellows and Members, and obstetric trainees of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Results:, Of the 1700 surveys distributed, 1066 (63%) were returned, of these, 805 (76% of responders) were currently practising and included in the analysis. The majority considered that asking women about fetal movement should be a part of routine care. Sixty per cent reported maternal perception of DFM for 12 h was sufficient evidence of DFM and 77% DFM for 24 h. KICK charts were used routinely by 39%, increasing to 66% following an episode of DFM. Alarm limits varied, the most commonly reported was < 10 movements in 12 h (74%). Only 6% agreed with the internationally recommended definition of < 10 movements in two hours. Interventions for DFM varied, while 81% would routinely undertake a cardiotocograph, 20% would routinely perform ultrasound and 20% more frequent antenatal visits. Conclusions:, While monitoring fetal movement is an important part of antenatal care in Australia and New Zealand, variation in obstetric practice for DFM is evident. Large-scale randomised controlled trials are required to identify optimal screening and management options. In the interim, high quality clinical practice guidelines using the best available advice are needed to enhance consistency in practice including advice provided to women. [source]


Participant evaluation of the RANZCOG Fetal Surveillance Education Program

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
Annie KROUSHEV
After a ,needs assessment', in 2004 the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists developed and introduced the Fetal Surveillance Education Program (FSEP) to provide high quality education to all clinicians caring for labouring women in Australia and New Zealand. A formal evaluation of the program was planned from the inception of FSEP. We report here the participant feedback from the first 4439 participants in 2004,2006. Overall, FSEP was considered a high quality resource, rated equally well by midwives and obstetricians. This is the first large-scale evaluation to be reported for any fetal surveillance education program. [source]


Survey of surgical skills of RANZCOG trainees

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 1 2009
Andreas OBERMAIR
Background: In Australia, the Integrated Training Program (ITP) of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) offers training in obstetrics and gynaecology. There is anecdotal concern among trainees and Fellows that the surgical component of training is inadequate, with new specialists lacking the confidence and competence to perform many ,standard' surgical procedures. These concerns have not previously been quantified in Australia and New Zealand. Aim: To determine trainees' subjective competence and confidence with surgical procedures and trainees' satisfaction with their surgical training. Methods: All 430 active RANZCOG trainees and 108 Fellows elevated within the previous two years were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire (65% response rate), which assessed details of procedures performed and confidence to perform them; satisfaction with the surgical training; and perceived teaching ability of the supervising consultants. Results: Those in ITP year 6 rated their confidence high (, 4 of 5) for procedures performed very frequently, but lower for other procedures. No procedure regarding the management of complications reached a confidence score of , 4. Teaching abilities were rated best for obstetric procedures, with 54% rating their consultants' teaching ability as ,excellent'; but for laparoscopic procedures and procedures dealing with complications, 21.2% and 23.4% of respondents rated their consultants' teaching ability as ,poor', respectively. Conclusions: Advanced trainees lacked confidence in a range of surgical procedures; and possible weaker areas were identified in the teaching experience of trainers. These limitations must be addressed by medical educators and training program coordinators. [source]


Coat of arms of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG)

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 1 2005
Rosalind WINSPEAR
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Vaginal birth after Caesarean section: A survey of practice in Australia and New Zealand

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 3 2003
Jodie Dodd
Abstract Aims: Women with a single prior Caesarean section (CS) in a subsequent pregnancy will be offered either a planned elective repeat CS or vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC). Recent reports of VBAC have highlighted risks of increased morbidity, including uterine rupture, and adverse infant outcome. A survey of practice was sent to fellows and members of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to determine current care for women in a subsequent pregnancy with a single prior CS, and to assess variations by length and type of obstetric practice. Methods: Questions asked about the safety of VBAC, induction of labour with a uterine scar, and requirements to conduct VBAC and elective repeat CS. Results: A total of 1641 surveys were distributed, with 1091 (67%) returned, 844 from practicing obstetricians (51% of college membership). Almost all respondents (96%) agreed or strongly agreed that VBAC should be presented as an option to the woman, varying from 90% where the indication for primary CS was breech, 88% for fetal distress, and 55% for failure to progress. Forty percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that VBAC was the safest option for the woman, and associated with fewer risks than CS. In contrast, 44% of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed that VBAC was the safest option for the infant, and opinions varied as to whether risks of VBAC outweighed those of CS for the infant. Almost two-thirds of practitioners would offer induction of labour to a woman with a prior CS in a subsequent pregnancy, one-third indicating a willingness to use vaginal prostaglandins, and 77% syntocinon. Most respondents preferred to conduct VBAC in a level two or three hospital (86%); required the availability within 30 min of an anaesthetist (81%), a neonatologist (84%), and operating theatre (97%); recommended continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (86%); intravenous access (90%); and routine group and hold (79%) during labour. For an elective repeat CS, most practitioners request routine blood for group and hold (78%), a neonatologist in theatre (77%), the use of an in-dwelling urinary catheter (96%), and the use of intraoperative antibiotics (82%). Conclusions: Most obstetricians indicated VBAC to be the safest option for the woman, but were less certain about benefits and risks for the infant. The consensus of practice is to present VBAC as an option and induce labour if needed. Vaginal birth after Caesarean is preferred in a level two or three hospital, with an anaesthetist, neonatologist and operating theatre available within 30 min. The use of continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring and intravenous access are recommended. In planned CS, a neonatologist in theatre is preferred, and an in-dwelling urinary catheter and intraoperative antibiotics will be used. [source]