New Views (new + views)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


New views on the Moon-Europe: Future lunar exploration, science objectives and integration of datasets DLR-Berlin, Germany 2002 January 14,16

METEORITICS & PLANETARY SCIENCE, Issue 3 2002
Vera Assis Fernandes
[source]


New views of the Earth's interior

ASTRONOMY & GEOPHYSICS, Issue 3 2009
James Wookey
First page of article [source]


Functional imaging: New views on lens structure and function

CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, Issue 12 2004
Paul J Donaldson
SUMMARY 1.,We have developed an experimental imaging approach that allows the distribution of lens membrane proteins to be mapped with subcellular resolution over large distances as a function of fibre cell differentiation. 2.,Using this approach in the rat lens, we have localized precisely histological sites of connexin 46 cleavage, quantitatively mapped changes in gap junction distribution and fibre cell morphology and correlated these changes to differences in intercellular dye transfer. 3.,Profiling of glucose transporter isoform expression showed that lens epithelial cells express GLUT1, whereas deeper cortical fibre cells express the higher-affinity GLUT3 isoform. Near the lens periphery, GLUT3 was located in the cytoplasm of fibre cells, but it underwent a differentiation-dependent membrane insertion. 4.,Similarly, the putative adhesion protein membrane protein 20 is inserted into fibre cell membranes at the stage when the cells lose their nuclei. This redistribution is strikingly rapid in terms of fibre cell differentiation and correlates with a barrier to extracellular diffusion. 5.,Our imaging-orientated approach has facilitated new insights into the relationships between fibre cell differentiation and lens function. Taken together, our results indicate that a number of strategies are used by the lens during the course of normal differentiation to change the subcellular distribution, gross spatial location and functional properties of key membrane transport proteins. [source]


Kostmann disease,infantile genetic agranulocytosis: historical views and new aspects

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 12 2002
Rolf ZetterströmArticle first published online: 2 JAN 200
The results in the main reports on infantile genetic agranulocytosis or Kostmann Syndrome are summarized. New views on the pathogensis of the syndrome are given in a recent paper by Pütsep et al. Kostmann syndrome may cause early onset Group B streptococcal neonatal sepsis as reported in this issue of Acta Paediatrica (9). Conclusion: Patients with Kostmann Syndrome who are successfully treated for agranulocytosis with serum colony stimulating factor remain deficient in cathelin-LL-37, a peptide antibiotic, which is normally present in neutrophils and saliva. This deficiency may explain that patients who are successfully treated for angranulocytosis continue to suffer from oral infections such as chronic periodontitis. [source]


Visual modelling: from images to images

COMPUTER ANIMATION AND VIRTUAL WORLDS (PREV: JNL OF VISUALISATION & COMPUTER ANIMATION), Issue 4 2002
Marc Pollefeys
Abstract This paper contains two parts. In the first part an automatic processing pipeline is presented that analyses an image sequence and automatically extracts camera motion, calibration and scene geometry. The system combines state-of-the-art algorithms developed in computer vision, computer graphics and photogrammetry. The approach consists of two stages. Salient features are extracted and tracked throughout the sequence to compute the camera motion and calibration and the 3D structure of the observed features. Then a dense estimate of the surface geometry of the observed scene is computed using stereo matching. The second part of the paper discusses how this information can be used for visualization. Traditionally, a textured 3D model is constructed from the computed information and used to render new images. Alternatively, it is also possible to avoid the need for an explicit 3D model and to obtain new views directly by combining the appropriate pixels from recorded views. It is interesting to note that even when there is an ambiguity on the reconstructed geometry, correct new images can often still be generated. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


A mind to blame: new views on involuntary acts,

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES & THE LAW, Issue 5 2003
Deborah W. Denno J.D., Ph.D.
This article examines the legal implications linked to recent scientific research on human consciousness. The article contends that groundbreaking revelations about consciousness expose the frailties of the criminal law's traditional dual dichotomies of conscious versus unconscious thought processes and voluntary versus involuntary acts. These binary doctrines have no valid scientific foundation and clash with other key criminal law defenses, primarily insanity. As a result, courts may adjudicate like individuals very differently based upon their (often unclear) understanding of these doctrines and the science that underlies them. This article proposes a compromise approach by recommending that the criminal law's concept of voluntariness consist of three parts: (i) voluntary acts, (ii) involuntary acts, and (iii) semi-voluntary acts. The semi-voluntary acts category, which is new, incorporates modern ideas of consciousness and also advances the law. Using some actual criminal cases, this article applies this new three-part grouping and demonstrates how it enhances a more just outcome for defendants, victims, and society. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Perspectives on polyploidy in plants , ancient and neo

BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, Issue 4 2004
MICHAEL D. BENNETT
It is timely to re-examine the phenomenon of polyploidy in plants. Indeed, the power of modern molecular technology to provide new insights, and the impetus of genomics, make polyploidy a fit, fashionable and futuristic topic for review. Some historical perspective is essential to understand the meaning of the terms, to recognize what is already known and what is dogma, and to frame incisive questions for future research. Polyploidy is important because life on earth is predominantly a polyploid phenomenon. Moreover, civilization is mainly powered by polyploid food , notably cereal endosperm. Ongoing uncertainty about the origin of triploid endosperm epitomizes our ignorance about somatic polyploidy. New molecular information makes it timely to reconsider how to identity polyploids and what is a polyploid state. A functional definition in terms of a minimal genome may be helpful. Genes are known that can raise or lower ploidy level. Molecular studies can test if, contrary to dogma, the relationship between diploids and polyploids is a dynamic two-way system. We still need to understand the mechanisms and roles of key genes controlling ploidy level and disomic inheritance. New evidence for genome duplications should be compared with old ideas about cryptopolyploidy, and new views of meiosis should not ignore premeiotic genome separation. In practice, new knowledge about polyploidy will be most useful only when it reliably predicts which crops can be usefully improved as stable autopolyploids and which genomes combined to create successful new allopolyloids. © 2004 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2004, 82, 411,423. [source]