New Social Movements (new + social_movement)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Books and Materials Reviews

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 2 2003
Article first published online: 17 FEB 200
Demo, D. H., Allen, K. R., and Fine, M. A. (Eds.). (1999). Handbook of Family Diversity. Golombok, S. (2000). Parenting: What Really Counts? Hewlett, S. A., Rankin, N., and West, C. (Eds.) (2002). Taking Parenting Public: The Case for a New Social Movement. Kozol, J. (2000). Ordinary Resurrections: Children in the Years of Hope. Krovetz, M. L. (1999). Fostering Resiliency: Expecting All Students to Use Their Minds Well. Lee, E. E. (2000). Nurturing Success: Successful Women of Color and Their Daughters. [source]


Conceptual Contributions of New Social Movements to Development Communication Research

COMMUNICATION THEORY, Issue 4 2001
Robert Huesca
The field of development communication faces a critical juncture regarding its theoretical and pragmatic relevance due to both internal debates and criticisms, and external restructuring of political, economic, and social systems on a global scale. The internal debates and criticisms indicate, at best, that the field is in some degree of conceptual disarray and, at worst, that it is detrimental to the goals of improving the human condition materially and symbolically. The concomitant external changes to social systems constitute a daunting context that questions the legitimacy and rationale of development efforts while fostering new forms of social change. This article argues that the field must redirect its attention in order to respond to the persistence of substandard living conditions that demonstrate the continued relevance of development efforts in general, specifically by drawing from the findings of scholarship of new social movements, combining them with relevant areas from participatory communication for development research. [source]


Front and Back Covers, Volume 26, Number 4.

ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY, Issue 4 2010
August 2010
Front cover caption, volume 26 issue 4 Front cover THE GAZA FREEDOM FLOTILLA Mohammed Rassas, a second-generation Palestinian, sports a T-shirt declaring his longing for the homeland he has never known. Mohammed's family was forced to leave Palestine long before he was born, with no opportunity for return. Instead, Mohammed has lived most of his life between Saudi Arabia and Greece, which became his second home. For three weeks Mohammed joined dozens of Greek, Arab and Western volunteers in preparing the Greek ship Eleftheri Mesogeios (,Free Mediterranean'), to carry 2000 tons of humanitarian aid, including prefabricated houses and hospital equipment, to Gaza. The ship formed part of the Gaza Freedom Flotilla, an international effort by volunteers from 36 countries that aimed to send eight ships to Gaza, carrying 700 passengers and 10,000 tonnes of humanitarian aid, in an attempt to prise open the strict embargo Israel has imposed on the Gaza strip since 2007. The Israeli army attacked the flotilla in international waters, killing eight Turkish nationals and one Turkish-American national, and injuring many more. Flotilla participants were placed behind bars. Intending to propagate their own version of events, the Israeli authorities confiscated audio-visual records made by witnesses. As an ethnographer invited to participate in the flotilla, Nikolas Kosmatopoulos was a witness to the events that took place. His notes are published in the form of a narrative in this issue of ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY. Israel has so far rejected the UN's call for an international independent inquiry. The Turkish government has threatened to cut all ties with Israel unless it apologizes or agrees to such an inquiry. Back cover CLIMATE CHANGE ,There is no planet B': an estimated 100,000 people demonstrate at the Copenhagen Climate talks, 12 December 2009. Since the débâcle of the UN Climate talks in Copenhagen last December, a broad new global coalition of resistance has begun to emerge. It includes the Climate Camp protesters who took direct action against the coal-fired Kingsnorth power station and the fourth runway at Heathrow, the tens of thousands of demonstrators who joined the Wave in London in December and the estimated 100,000 who marched at Copenhagen. They join others who have intimate experience of melting sea ice and Andean glaciers, flooding in Bangladesh and New Orleans and droughts in Africa. In April, in Cochabamba, Bolivia, a conference of 35,000 people, many of them indigenous Americans, began to organize to protect themselves and Mother Earth , Pachamama , to avert catastrophic climate change. This new social movement poses a personal and professional challenge to anthropologists to integrate climate issues and global politics into the discipline and into their lives. [source]


Structure versus culture again: Corporatism and the ,new politics' in 16 Western European countries

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL RESEARCH, Issue 5 2003
Bojan Todosijevi
This article analyzes the relationships between corporatism and ,new politics' using Siaroff's (1999) corporatism scores for 16 West European countries and data from Inglehart et al.'s (1998) World Value Survey. The results of the analysis show that corporatism is related to higher membership in peace movements and also to belief in the urgency of ecological problems. However, it is unrelated to postmaterialist values, votes for ,new parties', approval of the environmentalist and feminist movements, and willingness to contribute financially to environmental protection. The relationships between corporatism and ,new politics' is shown to be somewhat mediated by economic factors, while the hypothesis that postmaterialism is a principal factor behind the popularity of the new social movements is not substantiated. [source]


Conceptual Contributions of New Social Movements to Development Communication Research

COMMUNICATION THEORY, Issue 4 2001
Robert Huesca
The field of development communication faces a critical juncture regarding its theoretical and pragmatic relevance due to both internal debates and criticisms, and external restructuring of political, economic, and social systems on a global scale. The internal debates and criticisms indicate, at best, that the field is in some degree of conceptual disarray and, at worst, that it is detrimental to the goals of improving the human condition materially and symbolically. The concomitant external changes to social systems constitute a daunting context that questions the legitimacy and rationale of development efforts while fostering new forms of social change. This article argues that the field must redirect its attention in order to respond to the persistence of substandard living conditions that demonstrate the continued relevance of development efforts in general, specifically by drawing from the findings of scholarship of new social movements, combining them with relevant areas from participatory communication for development research. [source]