New Science (new + science)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


FOUNDING A NEW SCIENCE: MIND GENOMICS

JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 3 2006
HOWARD R. MOSKOWITZ
ABSTRACT We present in this article our vision for a new science, modeled on the emerging science of genomics and the technology of informatics. Our goal in this new science is to better understand how people react to ideas in a formal and structured way, using the principles of stimulus,response (from experimental psychology), conjoint analysis (from consumer research and statistics), Internet-based testing (from marketing research) and multiple tests to identify patterns of mind-sets (patterned after genomics). We show how this formal approach can then be used to construct new, innovative ideas in business. We demonstrate the approach using the development of new ideas for an electronic color palette for cosmetic products to be used by consumers. [source]


Old Science New Science

CONSERVATION, Issue 3 2002
Incorporating Traditional Ecological Knowledge into Contemporary Management
First page of article [source]


Psychology, Psychiatry, and Brain Neuroscience in Pain Medicine: New Tools for a New Science

PAIN MEDICINE, Issue 8 2008
Ajay Wasan MD
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


The Challenge of New Science

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2007
Gordon Rowland
A wide range of developments in science in recent years has altered our views of our world and ourselves in significant ways. These views challenge the direction of applied science and technology in many fields, including those associated with learning and performance in organizations. At the same time, they open up opportunities and possibilities. To take advantage, new approaches based on different assumptions are implied. This article summarizes a set of concepts associated with complexity and relates them to work in organizations. The final article of the issue then relates these same concepts to human performance technology. [source]


Happiness: Lessons From a New Science , R. Layard

THE BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, Issue 3 2006
Sonja Lyubomirsky
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


DIAGNOSING FROUDE'S DISEASE: BOUNDARY WORK AND THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY IN LATE-VICTORIAN BRITAIN

HISTORY AND THEORY, Issue 3 2008
IAN HESKETH
ABSTRACT Historians looking to make history a professional discipline of study in Victorian Britain believed they had to establish firm boundaries demarcating history from other literary disciplines. James Anthony Froude ignored such boundaries. The popularity of his historical narratives was a constant reminder of the continued existence of a supposedly overturned phase of historiography in which the historian was also a man of letters, transcending the boundary separating fact from fiction and literature from history. Just as professionalizing historians were constructing a methodology that called on historians to be inductive empirical workers, Froude refused to accept the new science of history, and suggested instead that history was an individual enterprise, one more concerned with drama and art than with science. E. A. Freeman warned the historical community that they "cannot welcome [Froude] as a partner in their labors, as a fellow-worker in the cause of historic truth." This article examines the boundary work of a professionalizing history by considering the attempt to exclude Froude from the historian's discourse, an attempt that involved a communal campaign that sought to represent Froude as "constitutionally inaccurate." Froude suffered from "an inborn and incurable twist," argued Freeman, thereby diagnosing "Froude's disease" as the inability to "make an accurate statement about any matter." By unpacking the construction of "Froude's disease," the article exposes the disciplinary techniques at work in the professionalization of history, techniques that sought to exclude non-scientific modes of thought such as that offered by Froude. [source]


FOUNDING A NEW SCIENCE: MIND GENOMICS

JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 3 2006
HOWARD R. MOSKOWITZ
ABSTRACT We present in this article our vision for a new science, modeled on the emerging science of genomics and the technology of informatics. Our goal in this new science is to better understand how people react to ideas in a formal and structured way, using the principles of stimulus,response (from experimental psychology), conjoint analysis (from consumer research and statistics), Internet-based testing (from marketing research) and multiple tests to identify patterns of mind-sets (patterned after genomics). We show how this formal approach can then be used to construct new, innovative ideas in business. We demonstrate the approach using the development of new ideas for an electronic color palette for cosmetic products to be used by consumers. [source]


Instream Flow Science For Sustainable River Management,

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, Issue 5 2009
Geoffrey E Petts
Abstract:, Concerns for water resources have inspired research developments to determine the ecological effects of water withdrawals from rivers and flow regulation below dams, and to advance tools for determining the flows required to sustain healthy riverine ecosystems. This paper reviews the advances of this environmental flows science over the past 30 years since the introduction of the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology. Its central component, Physical HABitat SIMulation, has had a global impact, internationalizing the e-flows agenda and promoting new science. A global imperative to set e-flows, including an emerging trend to set standards at the regional scale, has led to developments of hydrological and hydraulic approaches but expert judgment remains a critical element of the complex decision-making process around water allocations. It is widely accepted that river ecosystems are dependent upon the natural variability of flow (the flow regime) that is typical of each hydro-climatic region and upon the range of habitats found within each channel type within each region. But as the sophistication of physical (hydrological and hydraulic) models has advanced emerging biological evidence to support those assumptions has been limited. Empirical studies have been important to validate instream flow recommendations but they have not generated transferable relationships because of the complex nature of biological responses to hydrological change that must be evaluated over decadal time-scales. New models are needed to incorporate our evolving knowledge of climate cycles and morphological sequences of channel development but most importantly we need long-term research involving both physical scientists and biologists to develop new models of population dynamics that will advance the biological basis for 21st Century e-flow science. [source]


Plant neurobiology and green plant intelligence: science, metaphors and nonsense

JOURNAL OF THE SCIENCE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE, Issue 3 2008
Paul C Struik
Abstract This paper analyses the recent debates on the emerging science of plant neurobiology, which claims that the individual green plant should be considered as an intelligent organism. Plant neurobiology tries to use elements from animal physiology as elegant metaphors to trigger the imagination in solving complex plant physiological elements of signalling, internal and external plant communication and whole-plant organisation. Plant neurobiology proposes useful concepts that stimulate discussions on plant behaviour. To be considered a new science, its added value to existing plant biology needs to be presented and critically evaluated. A general, scientific approach is to follow the so-called ,parsimony principle', which calls for simplest ideas and the least number of assumptions for plausible explanation of scientific phenomena. The extent to which plant neurobiology agrees with or violates this general principle needs to be examined. Nevertheless, innovative ideas on the complex mechanisms of signalling, communication, patterning and organisation in higher plants are badly needed. We present current views on these mechanisms and the specific role of auxins in regulating them. Copyright 2007 Society of Chemical Industry [source]


The life and death of planet Earth: How the new science of astrobiology charts the ultimate fate of our world.

METEORITICS & PLANETARY SCIENCE, Issue 7 2003
Donald Brownlee, Peter D. Ward
[source]


Spectro-polarimetry in the era of large solar telescopes

ASTRONOMISCHE NACHRICHTEN, Issue 6 2010
H. Socas-Navarro
Abstract This paper discusses some of the challenges of spectro-polarimetric observations with a large aperture solar telescope such as the ATST or the EST. The observer needs to reach a compromise between spatial and spectral resolution, time cadence, and signal-to-noise ratio, as only three of those four parameters can be pushed to the limit. Tunable filters and grating spectrographs provide a natural compromise as the former are more suitable for high-spatial resolution observations while the latter are a better choice when one needs to work with many wavelengths at full spectral resolution. Given the requirements for the new science targeted by these facilities, it is important that 1) tunable filters have some multi-wavelength capability; and 2) grating spectrographs have some 2D field of view ( 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) [source]


In search of memory,the emergence of a new science of mind

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 9 2007
Hugo Lagercrantz
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Toward a semantic general theory of everything

COMPLEXITY, Issue 4 2010
Alexei V. Samsonovich
The notion of a universal semantic cognitive map is introduced as a general indexing space for semantics, useful to reduce semantic relations to geometric and topological relations. As a first step in designing the concept, the notion of semantics is operationalized in terms of human subjective experience and is related to the concept of spatial position. Then synonymy and antonymy are introduced in geometrical terms. Further analysis building on previous studies of the authors indicates that the universal semantic cognitive map should be locally low-dimensional. This essay ends with a proposal to develop a metric system for subjective experiences based on the outlined approach. We conclude that a computationally defined universal semantic cognitive map is a necessary tool for the emerging new science of the mind: a scientific paradigm that includes subjective experience as an object of study. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Complexity, 2010 [source]


Complexity and the Culture of Curriculum

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEORY, Issue 1 2008
William E. Doll
Abstract This paper has two main foci: (1) the history of curriculum design, and (2) implications from the new sciences of chaos and complexity for the development of new forms of curriculum design and teaching implementation. Regarding the first focus, the paper posits that there exist,to use Wittgenstein's phrase,,family resemblances' between Peter Ramus' 16th century curriculum design and that of Ralph Tyler in the 20th century. While this 400-year linkage is by no means linear, there are overlapping strands from Ramus to Comenius to the Puritans to colonial New England to Horace Mann to Ralph Tyler. What unites these strands, all belonging to the Protestant Methodization movement that swept across northern Europe into colonial America and the USA, is the concept of Method. Taylor's ,time and motion' studies set the stage for Tyler's Basic Principles of curriculum design,those starting with set goals and concluding with measured assessment. The second focus draws on the new sciences of chaos and complexity to develop a different sense of curriculum and instruction,open, dynamic, relational, creative, and systems oriented. The paper concludes with an integration of the rational/scientific with the aesthetic/spiritual into a view of education and curriculum informed by complexity. [source]