New Image (new + image)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Social Exclusion and the Welfare of the Child

JOURNAL OF LAW AND SOCIETY, Issue 3 2001
Shelley Day Sclater
The ,best interests of the child' is a pervasive notion in law, and the welfare discourse within which it acquires meaning has become increasingly dominant in our culture's stock of ,common sense'. Because this discourse positions children as dependent and vulnerable, it underpins images of children that can perpetuate the social, legal, and political marginalization of children. This paper uses the area of children and divorce to explore the ways in which this exclusion of children persists alongside both an ostensible commitment to the welfare of children and an increasingly strong rights discourse. We argue that constructions of the child as victim have both political and psychological dimensions: they serve to legitimize state intervention into ,private' family life, and they help assuage social anxieties about the alleged demise of ,the family'. At an individual level, they facilitate a process whereby children can become the repository for feelings with which adults cannot cope. We then suggest that two fundamental changes are required in order to address children's exclusion: the development of a more psychodynamically informed view of personhood and a new image of the child to inform policies. [source]


Exciting developments and a new image

AUSTRALIAN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY JOURNAL, Issue 1 2005
Janet Fricke
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Punta del Este as Global City? competing visions of Uruguayan nationhood in a geography of exclusion

CITY & SOCIETY, Issue 2 2004
DANIEL RENFREW
This article examines the controversies and struggles surrounding the Uruguayan workers confederation march from Montevideo to the exclusive resort city of Punta del Este in 2002. At stake were competing visions of the present and future direction of Uruguay. Punta del Este is central to the government's project of a "new" Uruguay: a service-oriented, outward-looking, and high-tech regional financial and economic center. The city presents a socially and spatially exclusive setting to showcase this new image, an exclusivity necessary in the face of the contrasting vision the protestors sought to highlight: an Uruguay of growing poverty, inequality and a questionable future. [source]


Visual modelling: from images to images

COMPUTER ANIMATION AND VIRTUAL WORLDS (PREV: JNL OF VISUALISATION & COMPUTER ANIMATION), Issue 4 2002
Marc Pollefeys
Abstract This paper contains two parts. In the first part an automatic processing pipeline is presented that analyses an image sequence and automatically extracts camera motion, calibration and scene geometry. The system combines state-of-the-art algorithms developed in computer vision, computer graphics and photogrammetry. The approach consists of two stages. Salient features are extracted and tracked throughout the sequence to compute the camera motion and calibration and the 3D structure of the observed features. Then a dense estimate of the surface geometry of the observed scene is computed using stereo matching. The second part of the paper discusses how this information can be used for visualization. Traditionally, a textured 3D model is constructed from the computed information and used to render new images. Alternatively, it is also possible to avoid the need for an explicit 3D model and to obtain new views directly by combining the appropriate pixels from recorded views. It is interesting to note that even when there is an ambiguity on the reconstructed geometry, correct new images can often still be generated. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The City as Social Display: Landed Elites and Urban Images in Charleston and Palermo

JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY, Issue 4 2001
Enrico Del Lago
The landed elites of Charleston and Palermo successfully modified the layout of the two cities by choosing particular areas of residence in which they could express their economic and social exclusivity through ,representational' architecture. In doing this, the two landed elites constructed images of the cities which built upon already established ones acquired in previous centuries. While the old images were the symbolic expressions of the political domination of two distant states over their colonies, the new images symbolized the power of the landed aristocrats, their domination of the social and economic life of the cities, and their commitment to nationalist struggles against new and hostile political institutions. [source]