New Home (new + home)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Loving America and Longing for Home: Isma'il al-Faruqi and the Emergence of the Muslim Diaspora in North America

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION, Issue 2 2004
Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi
In this paper, I weave the experience of an emerging community of Muslim diaspora around a biographical narrative of the Muslim activist and scholar Isma'il al-Faruqi. Through this narrative, I illustrate that the diasporic experience begins in the place of origin and it does not inevitably lead toward a perpetual hybridization. The latter point is particularly significant because notions of diaspora and hybridity are conceptually linked and are often understood as a unidirectional cutting and mixing between the West and the East, or between the modern and the traditional. Al-Faruqi's experience shows that, in a Fanonian sense of colonialism, diasporic experience conveys living as a "stranger", at and away from home. The postcolonial condition has made it possible for ethnically diverse communities of Muslims to reside in the West, but maintain strong connections with their place of origin. Adopting the allegory of the Prophet's migration or hijra, al-Faruqi constructed a fantastic notion of the ummah and a normative homo islamicus subject. Although he was profoundly influenced by the diversity of the Muslim Student Associations' constituency, al-Faruqi encouraged Muslims to transcend their differences and sought to conceive a discursively homogenous ummah. Ultimately, however, his project failed because it did not correspond to real life experiences of Muslims of the West. Historically, Muslim communities have negotiated the boundaries of Muslimhood and the social responsibilities it entails, both in their homelands and in their new home in the West , a new home that increasingly becomes hostile to their presence, and thereby further complicates their triangular diaspora/host society/homeland relationship. [source]


A new home awaits the hospitalist

JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE, Issue 1 2007
FACP, Jeff Wiese MD
[source]


Hopkins Architects' Kroon Hall, Yale University

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Issue 6 2009
Jayne Merkel
Abstract Stone-walled, barrel-vaulted Kroon Hall, the hulking new home of Yale University's pioneering School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, is a living laboratory of energy-efficient design as well as a sympathetic neighbour. Jayne Merkel describes the numerous problems the architects had to solve to make it compatible with the historic campus and actively experimental at the same time. Its pioneering green agenda even determined the character of its interior space warmly and subtly. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


CHANGES IN LAND USE/MANAGEMENT AND WATER QUALITY IN THE LONG CREEK WATERSHED,

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, Issue 6 2002
Daniel E. Line
ABSTRACT: Surface water in the Long Creek watershed, located in western Piedmont region of North Carolina, was monitored from 1993 to 2001. The 8,190 ha watershed has undergone considerable land use and management changes during this period. Land use surveys have documented a 60 percent decrease in cropland area and a more than 200 percent increase in areas being developed into new homes. In addition, more than 200 conservation practices have been applied to the cropland and other agricultural land that remains in production. The water quality of Long Creek was monitored by collecting grab samples at four sites along Long Creek and continuously monitoring discharge at one site. The monitoring has documented a 70 percent reduction in median total phosphorus (TP) concentrations, with little reductions in nitrate and total Kjel-dahl nitrogen, or suspended sediment levels. Fecal coliform (FC) and streptococci (FS) levels declined significantly downstream as compared to upstream during the last four years of monitoring. This decrease was attributed to the implementation of waste management practices and livestock exclusion fencing on three dairy operations in the watershed. Annual rainfall and discharge increased steadily until peaking in the third year of the monitoring period and varied while generally decreasing during the last four years of the project. An array of observation, pollutant concentration, and hydrologic data provide considerable evidence to suggest that the implementation of BMPs in the watershed have significantly reduced phosphorus and bacteria levels in Long Creek. [source]